The 2014 fall/holiday movie season – a.k.a. the awards season – brings with it four candidates for McConaissance-style comebacks: Reese Witherspoon, Steve Carell, Michael Keaton and Shia LaBeouf. All have films on tap that could alter their career trajectories.

Renner movie focuses on the late Capitol investigative reporter Gary Webb

Fall movies are on the horizon and The Bee’s Carla Meyer gives you a glimpse of films hitting the box office for the rest of the season.

Perhaps as a sign this summer couldn't be over soon enough for Hollywood, the top three positions at the box office for the weekend were exactly the same as last week: "Guardians of the Galaxy" continued its surprising run with an estimated three-day draw of $16.3 million, and with a cumulative total of $274.6 million in the U.S. and Canada through Sunday, the film became the top box-office draw not only of the summer but of the year so far, passing "Captain America: The Winter Solider."

If you had to guess which movie director was recently the first to be granted access to the nonpublic areas of the catacombs six stories beneath the streets of Paris, you might say, Luc Besson, Leos Carax or another of France’s most prominent names.

The force is with Harrison Ford.

Current films are reviewed each week to provide parents a guide to decide what may be appropriate to younger viewers

Grass Valley native Brice to show his psychological thriller, a hit at South by Southwest, at Nevada City Film Festival

On his 60th birthday in May 2013, Pierce Brosnan woke up in Belgrade, Serbia. In three days he was to start shooting a new action-thriller called “The November Man,” playing a world-weary but still lethal ex-CIA agent – the sort of role that would involve a whole lot of running, jumping, pistol-whipping and fireball-dodging.

Pierce Brosnan’s perfect hair barely budges in the breeze, he fixes his eyes in that narrowed, steely stare and you remember, yes, he was a pretty good James Bond.

In an obituary Aug. 24 on actor-director Richard Attenborough, The Associated Press erroneously reported that "In Which We Serve," a movie starring Attenborough, won an Oscar for Best Picture in 1942. The film did not win that award — the best picture that year was "How Green Was My Valley."

‘Golden State of Mind’ sheds some light on the late TV host, who was outgoing and effusive on camera but private off it.

The more interesting story lies in how the Spartans built their 151-game streak, but ‘When the Game Stands Tall’ focuses on them losing it

“If I Stay,” based on Gayle Forman’s popular novel for young adults, is likely to appeal to youthful fans of the book and the movie’s star, Chloë Grace Moretz, an audience that may not recognize the clichéd situations and the artless dialogue for what they are. Older moviegoers (and more discerning teenagers) are unlikely to be attracted to this unabashed tearjerker.

“The Amazing Spider-Man 2” (PG-13, 142 minutes, Sony): This sequel is a strenuously chipper but nonetheless saggy, baggy and mostly ho-hum addition to the Spider-Man canon. What was once its greatest strength – its casting – is on the verge of becoming its biggest liability. Whereas the chief pleasure of the first “Amazing Spider-Man” was the cuddly chemistry between Peter Parker (played by Andrew Garfield) and his girlfriend Gwen (Emma Stone), here they generate fewer sparks than questions. Namely: how a 30-year-old and 25-year-old (respectively), despite their proven and prodigious talents, can be expected to play recent high school graduates with any degree of credibility? Contains sequences of sci-fi action and violence. Extras include commentary from director Marc Webb, deleted scenes and Alicia Keys’ “It’s On Again” music video. Also, on Blu-ray: a six-part, behind-the-scenes making-of documentary and nine additional deleted scenes (including “Peter Meets His Father”). 3-D version also available.

Forty dollars will buy you a back-room doctor who will remove a bullet from your leg in Sin City, but notwith anesthesia.

Nisha Grayson didn’t travel to Goa, India, to vacation. She wanted to understand how her life began, and what it might have been like if she had not been given up for adoption.

Now and then, Hollywood magic results from something decidedly non-glamorous – like a guy reading a book on a pile of smelly football shoulder pads.

His first romantic comedy represents another well-plotted step in the actor’s post- ‘Harry Potter’ career

It’s crunch time for the 24 Sacramento filmmakers facing a Sunday deadline to complete their short entries for the Sacramento Film and Music Festival’s “10x10 Filmmaker Challenge.”

The French scenery is lovely, but the script is thin and the romantic pairing is lacking in sparks.

Scarlett Johansson’s character Lucy in the eponymous hit movie in theaters has such a highly functioning brain that she develops telepathy and telekinesis. When Lucy is accidentally drugged and harnesses her brain’s full potential, she achieves superhuman powers.

In the post-Apocalypse, order is all-important. We know this, not only because that makes intuitive sense, but because, just in the past few months, we’ve seen “Snowpiercer” and “Divergent,” which also deal with what happens after a civil collapse. “The Giver,” the latest in this weird trend, approaches a now-familiar topic from a new angle, and, of the three, it’s the most visually arresting.

The romantic comedy recipe is so well-known and foolproof that the great mystery about them is how rarely the romantic fools in Hollywood get it right.

“Expendables 3” could have been called “The Dependables” for its return of the action-movie stars we’ve come to expect, including ringleader Sylvester Stallone, Jason Statham, Arnold Schwarzenegger, and 3rd Dan black belt and real-life chemical engineer Dolph Lundgren.

Robin Williams showed an acting range like no comedic actor before him. But he was too bursting with life – with humor, empathy and personal authenticity – to stick to one path.

It’s rare that a movie is as good as the book on which it’s based. It’s even more unusual when it’s better

Current films are reviewed each week to provide parents a guide to decide what may be appropriate to younger viewers

The film is worth seeing, however, just for Helen Mirren’s and veteran Indian actor Om Puri’s performances

“Into the Storm” is as close to a real tornado as most of us would ever want to get. Its effects are so spectacular that it makes “Twister” look like “The Wizard of Oz.” You wonder, as immersive as all those objects flying off the screen are, why they didn’t film it in 3D. Secretly, you’re grateful they didn’t.

The steroidal title characters in “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” look as if they’re going to end up on a cartoon version of the Mitchell Report. Some day, historians will look back at this generation’s baseball players, Outback Steakhouse appetizers and ninja turtles as symbols of the era’s excess.

Its big stars hidden in voice roles, the space-set blockbuster allows lesser-knowns like Chris Pratt and Dave Bautista to shine.

Film shot over 12 years carries the audience along through a maturation process.

Documentary offers fascinating insights into the late movie reviewer’s relationships to his wife and to fellow critic Siskel

‘Get on Up” is a movie of uncompromising soul, unadulterated funk and unalloyed joy.

Current films are reviewed each week to provide parents a guide to decide what may be appropriate to younger viewers.

Richard Linklater’s “Boyhood” is a coming-of-age story in which the lead actor (Ellar Coltrane), as well as his character, literally come of age before viewers’ eyes. Linklater began filming in 2002, reconvening his cast for three- or four-day shoots for the next 11 years to tell the fictional story of a Texas boy named Mason.

The smart spy thriller, based on a John le Carré novel, stars the late actor as an anti-terror specialist.

In Mike Cahill movies, bad things happen to good people, and other good people are guilt-ridden as a result. But the human connections and the spare sci-fi logic that characterized “Another Earth,” Cahill’s ethereal romantic dramatic debut, are muddied in his second feature, “I Origins.”

The actress brings a matter-of-fact toughness to her role as woman with drug-induced mental super powers, but the film becomes a silly mishmash of ideas.

Two old pros show the kids how chemistry works in a romantic comedy in “And So It Goes,” a love-the-last-time-around romp that’ll give its target audience the warm fuzzies.

Zach Braff’s “Wish I Was Here” is a sweet and jokey feature film that is so at home in the punchline rhythms of TV sitcoms that you may think to yourself, “When’s his best friend/former ‘Scrubs’ co-star Donald Faison showing up?”

Current films are reviewed each week to provide parents a guide to decide what may be appropriate to younger viewers

The unholy bond between religion and politics is the background for “Persecuted,” a confused and confusing thriller about a TV preacher ruined by a sinister government plot.

Attendance keeps climbing as festival refines its mix of recent Japanese films and classics

“Planes: Fire & Rescue” is roughly twice as good as its predecessor, “Planes,” which was so story- and laugh-starved it would have given “direct-to-video” a bad name. Yes, there was nowhere to go but up.

Current films are reviewed each week to provide parents a guide to decide what may be appropriate to younger viewers

The cinematic equivalent of herpes, “Sex Tape” is an uncomfortable embarrassment to raunchy comedies everywhere. Fortunately no medication is required after being exposed to it: The effects are not permanent, only painful.

New DVD release for this week include ‘Rio 2’ and ‘Under the Skin’

“The Grand Seduction” slowly brings its story into focus and then sneaks up and becomes quite funny. It’s an English-language Canadian film based on a 2003 French-Canadian film (“Le Grand Seduction”), which only goes to show that if you have a bilingual country, you can make everything twice.

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