California Traveler getawaysLoading
 Previous 1 / 124 Next 
  • 7N28BLUERIDGE
    BLUE RIDGE TRAIL, CACHE CREEK
    "Poised like a massive wave forever about to break, a mighty ridge looms on the west rim of the Sacramento Valley. Yet despite its high visibility to drivers speeding past Fairfield on Interstate 80, this lofty geologic neighbor – Blue Ridge – retains an air of mystery. But it's a mystery that can be probed."

    PHOTO CAPTION: The Blue Ridge trailhead leads hikers to its namesake, a rocky spine that runs for 29 miles through the Cache Creek Natural Area.

    Read the story here.

    View the gallery here.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N28BLUERIDGE5
    The terrain is rugged with scattered tree cover and no potable water, so visitors should plan accordingly.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N28BLUERIDGE3
    Paul McHugh Special to The Bee Here's where it starts: The Blue Ridge trailhead leads hikers to its namesake, a rocky spine that runs for 29 miles through the Cache Creek Natural Area.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N28BLUERIDGE2
    Paul McHugh Special to The Bee The Blue Ridge Trail climbs more than 2,000 feet in a three-mile stretch. Its highest point is Fiske Peak, 2,868 feet above sea level.
  • 7N14PIONEERJ
    PIONEERTOWN
    "Daytime drags on Mane Street in this lonesome Old West town. Time elongates and lassos your ambition, rustles it down in the dusty street and leaves you spent and enervated in the post-meridian quiet."

    PHOTO CAPTION: The "Old West" section of Pioneertown actually was built in the late 1940's, but its Western horse culture is the real thing. One of Mane Street's main businesses is a saddlery.

    Read the story here.
    Christopher Reynolds | Los Angeles Times
  • 7N14PIONEER2
    A lonesome breeze stirs the dust on Pioneertown's Mane Street, where weekend tourists wander the handful of shops and provide business for the motel and post office.
    Bruce Chambers | Orange County Register
  • 7N14PIONEER
  • 7N7JOSHUAJ4
    In the town of Joshua Tree is Shari Elf's "Art Queen" gallery. One of its offerings is the "World Famous Crochet Museum," which is filled with many pieces of the yarn-based work.
  • 7N7JOSHUAJ2
    One of the Joshua Tree area's many art installations with a touch of humor is this one in Pipes Canyon northwest of the town. It is called "You Are Here."
    Sam McManis | smcmanis@sacbee.com
  • 7N7JOSHUA2
    A shrine to Gram Parsons stands a few feet outside the door of Room 8 at the Joshua Tree Inn, where the influential country-rocker died in 1973.
    Abigail Miles | Noble Hare Studios
  • 7N31STOCKTON3
    STOCKTON
    "A shop owner here on Miracle Mile, who won't be named because she was so darn nice and said she "still has to work in this city," nearly laughed me out of her store when I mentioned I was working on a travel story about Stockton."

    PHOTO CAPTION: The Bob Hope Theatre in downtown Stockton, formerly the Fox, hosts many concerts and has regular showings of classic movies. It's listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

    Read the story here.

    View the gallery here.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N30STOCKTON2
    Stockton's downtown waterfront district can be a quiet place but is also home the of two minor-league sports teams and other entertainment options.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N31STOCKTON
    Trumpter John Daversa, in red shirt, plays with the Dave Brubeck Institute Jazz Quintet recently at Valley Brewing Co. in Stockton.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N31STOCKTONJ2
    A couple browse paintings at Stockton's Haggin Museum, home of fine art and local history.
  • Traveler centerpiece on Bodega Bay. The peg is that this is the 50th anniversary of the filming of "The Birds"
    BODEGA BAY
    "When last seen – cinematically, that is – this pleasant town on the Sonoma coast had been engulfed in Hitchcockian horror. Birds, birds everywhere. Crows, gulls and sparrows. Angry birds, not of the smart-phone species."

    PHOTO CAPTION: Bodega Head near Bodega Bay, Calif., which the National Audubon Society has called one of the nation's top birding spots.

    Read the story here.

    View the gallery here.
    Manny Crisostomo | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N6GASLAMP4
    SAN DIEGO'S GASLAMP QUARTER
    "Under an ornate arch spanning the width of Fifth Avenue, boldly proclaiming the Gaslamp Quarter as the "Historic Heart of San Diego," dogs of many breeds and sartorial splendor roamed free."

    PHOTO CAPTION: San Diego trades on its history in the Gaslamp Quarter, where quaint images contrast with modern-day shoppers and nightclubbers.

    Read the story here.
    J. Katarzyna Woronowicz | Special to The Bee
  • 7N6GASLAMPJ
    You know where you stand if you're at the center of the Gaslamp District at Fifth Avenue and Market Street in San Diego.
    J. Katarzyna Woronowicz | Special to The Bee
  • 7N6GASLAMP
    San Diego's historic Gaslamp Quarter features restored historic buildings, many of them given over to uses that would have astonished their original builders.
    J. Katarzyna Woronowicz | Special to The Bee
  • 7N2CHAPELJ.JPG
    MARE ISLAND
    "People always get excited when they find out about the stained glass out here," said Joyce Giles, a volunteer who manages the Mare Island Historic Park Foundation museum. "It's the biggest collection of Tiffany art under one roof west of the Mississippi."

    PHOTO CAPTION: The triptych in the chapel's east wall, although designed by Tiffany, was constructed by Ingerson and Glaser of San Francisco.

    Read the story here.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N2CHAPEL2.JPG
    St. George stands over the corpse of his dragon. The Tiffany stained-glass scene is among the 25 panels installed in Saint Peter's Chapel on Mare Island in the early 1900s.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N2CHAPEL.JPG
    Jesus lifts Peter from the water, one of the Tiffany stained-glass scenes that are among 25 panels installed in Saint Peter's Chapel on Mare Island in the early 1900s.
  • 7N2CHAPEL3.JPG
    St. Peter's Chapel on Mare Island
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N25MENDO3.JPG
    MENDOCINO
    "We are tramping through the moist, mossy woods, Brandi, Morgan and I, hot on the hunt for mushrooms. None of us is a hard-core mycophile, couldn't pronounce the polysyllabic Latinate names if our lives depended on it. And, considering the toxicity of some of the fungi fruiting in the forest, it just might."

    PHOTO CAPTION: Lansing Street in the town of Mendocino offers sights and treats for those less outdoorsy in their explorations.

    Read the story here.

    View the gallery here.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N25MENDOEND.JPG
    The lobby of the Stanford Inn by the Sea in Mendocino offers an air of the area’s past and of its current rustic elegance.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N25MENDOJ.JPG
    Glass Beach, which long ago was a garbage dump at the ocean’s edge at Fort Bragg, has become home to polished reminders of the past.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N25MENDO2.JPG
    Cate Hawthorne of Liquid Fusion Kayaking, engages in one of the region's outdoor delights, paddling the peaceful Noyo River in Fort Bragg.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N30ARCATA.JPG
    ARCATA
    If you really want to have a mind-blowing experience when visiting this funky, friendly and slightly freaky North Coast college town, have I got the place for you.

    PHOTO CAPTION: Frank is a friendly fellow who spends a lot of time at McKinley Square in downtown Arcata – or at least used to before the city clamped down there on activities, or the lack thereof.

    Read the story here.

    View the gallery here.
    Renée C. Byer | rbyer@sacbee.com
  • 7N30ARCATA2.JPG
    Another of the community's quiet locations is the Arcata Community Forest near the Humboldt State University campus, where Damien King and Shelly Miller explore recently. The area overall is a study of differences and an experiment in how people get along amid them.
    Renée C. Byer | rbyer@sacbee.com
  • We visit 4 streets in the city of Oakland:  Piedmont Avenue, Telegraph Avenue,  College Avenue and Grand Avenue.
    Bakesale Betty owner Alison Barakat pulls out cookies for the lunch crowd at Oakland's Temescal neighborhood on Telegraph Avenue, between 51st and 42nd streets. A blue bewigged former chef at fancy Chez Panisse, Barakat created a fried chicken sandwich - a succulent slab of buttermilk-breaded poultry on a Torpedo roll, garnished with jalepeno-flecked slaw.
    Manny Crisostomo | The Sacramento Bee
  • 7N26GRIZZLY.JPG

    ICE HOUSE RESERVOIR

    "As far back as the mid-1980s I had read of Grizzly Lake, situated beautifully at 7,100 feet, just below Thompson Peak, the Trinity Alps' highest point at 9,002 feet. The only route I recalled was the 17.5-mile (or up to 19, depending on your source) trail from the Hobo Gulch trailhead – a two-day hike."

    Grizzly Meadows opens up below Grizzly Falls, center background, which flows from Grizzly Lake, below Thompson Peak, upper right.
    Read the story here.
    Tom Sellers | tsellers@sacbee.com
  • 7N26GRIZZLY2.JPG
    A rattlesnake takes up a defensive position along the Hobo Gulch trail to Grizzly Lake.
    Photo courtesy of Jasmine Giroux
  • 7N26GRIZZLYJ.JPG
    Brooke Moss of Fair Oaks clambered up to Grizzly Lake from the meadow below on the third day of summer to find this snow and ice fromthe previous day’s storm.
    Courtesy of Brooke Moss
  • 7N26GRIZZLYJ2.JPG
    Brooke Moss and her dog, Bogey, trek toward Grizzly Lake. Her father, George Chapman, is close behind.
    Tom Sellers | tsellers@sacbee.com
  • 7N5LAKEJMP.JPG
    A kayaker looks all alone on Ice House Reservoir, though he's likely to have company in the form of swimmers, skiers and fishermen.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N5LAKE2.JPG
    Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com Zoe Conant, 7, leaps into Ice House Reservoir in the Eldorado National Forest. The man-made lake is a favorite of vacationers and day-trippers hoping to avoid crowds.
  • 7N5LAKEJMP2.JPG
    Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com Zoe Conant, 7, leaps into Ice House Reservoir in the Eldorado National Forest. The man-made lake is a favorite of vacationers and day-trippers hoping to avoid crowds.
  • People rappel into Moaning Cavern in Vallecitos

    MOANING CAVERN

    Carole Oldenburg of Danville uses her feet to stabilize her decent into Moaning Cavern in Vallecitos. Named after a sound created by dripping water falling into holes at the bottom of the main chamber, you can rappel down 165 feet to the bottom of the cave. The best thing: it's always 61 degrees inside.

    Read the story here.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N29CAVERN.JPG
    Jason Hertman, 22, of Illinois rappels into Moaning Cavern in Vallecito. Those not wanting to dangle on a rope may use the stairs.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N22FRESNOJ.JPG

    FORESTIERE UNDERGROUND GARDENS IN FRESNO

    Follow a tree-canopied path down past Roman archways, down farther to a cool, blessedly cool, underground sanctuary, down to the architectural and horticultural wonder that is the Forestiere Underground Gardens.

    Read the story here.
    Mark Crosse | Fresno Bee file, 2010
  • 7N22FRESNOJ2.JPG
    A portrait of Baldassare Forestiere sits on a shelf with other personal effects.
    Mark Crosse | Fresno Bee file, 2010
  • Santa Barbara

    SANTA BARBARA

    Some high achievers at the visitors bureau of this lovely city apparently devoted chunks of time and filled out what must've been reams of paperwork just so they could slap a registered trademark on a phrase they've proudly embraced - "The American Riviera®."

    Skateboards and other memorabilia on display in the Santa Barbara Surfing Museum.

    Read the story here.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • Santa Barbara
    Lounge chairs at night at the Presidio Motel in Santa Barbara June 18, 2012. All of the rooms were painted by UC Santa Barbara students.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • Santa Barbara
    A line snakes outside of famous La Super-Rica Taqueria in Santa Barbara June 19, 2012. Former Santa Barbara resident, Julia Childs, said this was her favorite place for tacos. Now tourists and locals alike flock to this taqueria.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • Santa Barbara
    A surfing motif is present in one of the best breakfast spots in Santa Barbara, Esau's Cafe.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • Santa Barbara
    Floral displays are common amongst the white stucco and red tiled buildings making Santa Barbara have a cohesive beautiful feel everywhere you turn.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • Santa Barbara
    For only 25 cents (going up to 50 cents soon) the Downtown Waterfront Shuttle transports passengers up and down a two-mile stretch of Santa Barbara's State Street, popular for its shopping June 19, 2012.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • 7N1TRAINJMP.JPG

    SAN LUIS OBISPO

    They call this self-contained Central Coast college town "The Happiest Place in America." Not happy, as in Up With People spirit or relentless Disneyfied mirth. Just, you know, being content and at ease, comfortable in your own SPF-protected skin.

    The Pacific Surfliner between San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara hugs the California coast, affording riders unmatched views of the Pacific Oceana.

    Read the story here.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • 7N1TRAIN.JPG
    Jann Gumbiner gazes out from on board Amtrak's Pacific Surfliner between San Luis Obispo to Santa Barbara.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • 7N1SLO.JPG
    A statue of Father Junipero Serra stands outside Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa.
  • 7N1SLOJ3.JPG
    Even the bubble gum is smiling in "Bubblegum Alley" in San Luis Obispo. The gum has been accumulating on the wall on Higuera Street north of Broad since 1960.
  • Title
    A veiw of the ocean on the Amtrak's Pacific Surfliner traveling from Santa Barbara to San Luis Obispo, arguably, the most scenic 2 1/2 hour segment of train route in California.
    Autumn Cruz | acruz@sacbee.com
  • 7N24PASSNU.JPG

    SIERRA PASSES

    If the sheer notion of a road trip strikes you as boring, well, maybe you should give it a pass. Specifically, aim for one of the high mountain passes that provide incredible vista points and gateways to outdoor recreation in the central Sierra.

    Monitor Pass on Highway 89 offers the most scenic views of peaks in the Carson-Iceberg Wilderness and Eldorado National Forest.

    Read the story here.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N24PASSESJ3.JPG
    A monument marks Monitor Pass, a 8,314-foot crest on the shoulder of Leviathan Peak. On the west, Highway 89 joins Highway 4 to Markleeville.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N24PASSESJ2.JPG
    The Kirkwood Inn near Carson Pass serves up hearty roadhouse fare in a log cabin built by rancher Zachary Kirkwood back in 1864.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N24PASSNUJMP.JPG
    Carson Pass was scouted by famed guide Kit Carson; this route was established over the Sierra in 1844.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N24PASSES2.JPG
    Sonora Pass, at the crest of Highway 108 at 9,624 feet, features steep grades, one-lane roads and very tight turns. It's not recommended for folks driving large RVs, but if you have a small car, go for it.
    Paul McHugh | Special to The Bee
  • 7N3GLAMPING.JPG

    CENTRAL COAST, CA

    "Glamping" - that's the smashed-together term meaning "glamorous camping," a high-end activity for those seeking to commune with nature without struggling with troublesome tent poles, without sleeping on the cold, unforgiving ground, while substituting organic, locally grown cuisine for reheated beans and franks, and happily trading up from s'mores to tiramisu.

    Guests at Treebones Resort, at the southern end of Big Sur and a scenic drive north from Hearst Castle, enjoy the sunset over the Pacific Ocean from the comfort of their yurt.

    Read the story here.
  • 7N3GLAMPINGJ2.JPG
    The yurts at Treebones Resort in Big Sur feature pine wood floors, queen-sized beds, an electric fireplace and afford great views of the ocean.
    Treebones Resort
  • 7N3GLAMPINGJ.JPG
    The comfortable tent cabins of Costanoa Lodge near Pescadero are situated on level ground amid tress, with the ocean just a short walk away
    Costanoa Lodge
  • 7N3GLAMPING2.JPG
    Yes, the walls are canvas, but the beds are queen-size – with heated mattresses – at Costanoa Lodge, less than a mile from the Pacific Ocean.
    Costanoa Lodge
  • 7N27WLASUNSET.JPG

    WEST LOS ANGELES, CA

    Filled with shops hocking organic raw foods and hotels offering sustainable and eco-friendly accommodations, West Los Angeles communities like Santa Monica and Venice fuel the organic, uber-lefty, politically correct stereotypes that lots of non-Californians have of the Golden State.

    The Santa Monica Pier is a destination for sport fishing, amusement rides, dining and shopping.

    Read the story here.
    R. Landau | Santa Monica Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • 7N27WLATASTING.JPG
    At the Tasting Kitchen in Venice, a diner might sample sweetbreads with fennel pollen or black truffle tagliatelle followed by orange olive oil cake or grapefruit-rosemary sorbet.
    Niles Harrison
  • 7N27WLACHEF.JPG
    Chef Casey Lane of the Tasting Kitchen in Venice's Abbot Kinney area.
    Longrada Lore
  • 7N27WLABEACH.JPG
    A solar-powered Ferris wheel looms over the Santa Monica Pier.
    Sandra Stocker | Santa Monica Convention and Visitors Bureau
  • Santa Monica's pedestrian-friendly Third Street Promenade is just a few blocks from the beach. The palm-lined boulevard holds many of downtown's most popular shopping destinations.
    Santa Monica Convention & Visitors Bureau
  • 7N10BISBEE.JPG

    BISBEE, ARIZONA

    People here like to say that, once you emerge from the Mule Pass Tunnel heading south into town, you go back in time to the Old West.

    Perched on a steep hillside, Bisbee Ariz., survives as a tourist destination after the last mine closed in 1975.

    Read the story here.
    Thomas Swick | South FloridaSun Sentinel file
  • bisbee
    Huachuca Mountains west of Bisbee.
    Doug Hocking
  • Bisbee Copper Queen Hotel's Front Lobby Area.
    Matthew Fink | Copper Queen Hotel
  • Main Street in downtown Bisbee.
    Doug Hocking
  • Bisbee Mining & Historical Museum.
    Doug Hocking
  • uss_hornet

    USS HORNET

    Since docking in Alameda in 1998 and opening as a museum, the Hornet has staged many popular activities: annual New Year's Eve swing-band bashes, overnight stays for Scout troops, special tributes to Greatest Generation members.

    But much of its recent renown has come from its reputation as a sanctuary for spirits, a veritable poltergeist portal.

    Once, the USS Hornet protected the US during WWII. The Hornet, a massive aircraft carrier, is permanently docked in the East Bay and its tours, including overnight stays, are popular with tourists. The "Mystery Tour," a three-hour look-see deep into the bowels of the ship where Navy folks swear there are ghosts and other "mysterious" activity.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.
    Jose Luis Villegas | jvillegas@sacbee.com
  • 7N13HORNETJMP.JPG
    Mitchell Weigand of Oakley shines a flashlight into the dark corners during a tour of the USS Hornet, a decommissioned aircraft carrier docked in Alameda.
    JOSÉ LUIS VILLEGAS | jvillegas@sacbee.com
  • uss_hornet
    USS Hornet Docent, Susan Martin looks back at a flashlight that turned on and off when asked to in a dining hall on the Hornet.
    Jose Luis Villegas | jvillegas@sacbee.com
  • uss_hornet
    Geoff Weigand of San Jose, California tours the sleeping quarters near the focsle of the USS Hornet. Once the USS Hornet protected the US during WWII.
    Jose Luis Villegas | jvillegas@sacbee.com
  • uss_hornet
    Michael Jones (foreground) of San Carlos, California listens as docent, Bob Freeman (center) talk about the history of the USS Hornet.
    Jose Luis Villegas | jvillegas@sacbee.com
  • 7N6PASO.JPG

    PASO ROBLES

    This rural Central Coast town of 30,000, a half-hour's scenic drive from seaside Cambria and 42 miles from Hearst Castle, draws a continuous stream of visitors lured by its striking countryside, laid-back vibe and neighborliness.

    Winemaker Jason Haas inspects rows of grenache blanc grapes at Tablas Creek Vineyard in Paso Robles, where the number of wineries has exploded since the 1980s.

    Read the story here.
    Eric Risberg | Associated Press file, 2010
  • 7N6PASO5.JPG
    A visitor becomes part of a juggling act as fans await the end of Stage 5 of the 2011 Tour of California in downtown Paso Robles.
    Joe Johnston | San Luis Obispo Tribune file, 2011
  • 7N6PASO4.JPG
    Wine tourism has become a big part of Paso Robles' appeal. Dozens of wineries offer their wares at local festivals.
    Jayson Mellon | Paso Robles Wine Festival 2010
  • 7N6PASOINN.JPG
    Joe Johnston San Luis Obispo Tribune file, 2010 Some of the patio spas at the Paso Robles Inn feature water piped in from hot springs.
  • 7N15INTER5.JPG

    INTERSTATE 5

    Coming down off the Grapevine, negotiating the curves as skillfully as a stock-car driver, you get momentary glimpses of the Valley floor. Then, just past the runaway truck ramp, the hills part and the view widens. Spread out in front of you is a vast expanse of Interstate 5, miles of shimmering road heading off to the horizon.

    Travelers on Interstate 5 between the Grapevine and Stockton are surrounded by vast agricultural fields broken up by the occasional rest stop.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N15I5JMP.JPG
    Travelers on Interstate 5 between the Grapevine and Stockton are surrounded by vast agricultural fields broken up by the occasional rest stop.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • Interstate 5 bridge
    Interstate 5 crosses the Sacramento River above the Alamar Marina in the Natomas area.
    Dave Henry
  • Aerials in and around Sacramento
    A flock of birds flies south of Interstate 5 near Twin Cities Road Thursday morning.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N8HWY99.JPG

    HIGHWAY 99

    Highway 99 is historic, anointed with its number and identity in 1926 when federal officials allocated funds to connect chaotic roads into contiguous routes. By 1928, according to Jill Livingston's seminal book, "That Ribbon of Highway II" (Living Gold Press, $17.99, 216 pages), the U.S. government called 99 "the longest continuously improved highway in the country."

    The first must-see Highway 99 stop is a 50-foot thermometer with 4,000 LED lights in Galt. It's in front of Giddens Brothers Heating & Air Conditioning.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N8HWY99JMP.JPG
    Tom’s Smokin’ Barbeque in Tulare serves up food in what used to be the fuselage of a 1951 T-29 Air Force navigation training plane.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N8HWY99JMP2.JPG
    A decaying sign is all that remains of Stockton’s Pollardville Ghost Town, an amusement park with an Old West theme that included jails and mock gunfights.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N8HWY992.JPG
    This A&W Drive-in, built in Modesto in 1957, helped inspire the film “American Graffiti.” Waitress Jessica Briseno, like all the car hops, must be nimble on skates.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • Burlingmame Travel

    BURLINGAME

    Instead of immediately making tracks back to Sacramento from SFO, we suggest a detour to Burlingame for some chill time. The San Mateo County town of 28,800- plus is only a five-minute drive south of SFO on Highway 101, via the Broadway Avenue exit, and an ideal place to unwind before the trek home. Stroll, shop, dine.

    The Burlingame train station is a working station for the Caltrain commute line in Burlingame, Calif., February 23, 2012.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.
    Paul Kitagaki Jr. | pkitagaki@sacbee.com
  • 7N1BURLING3.JPG
    Burlingame Tobacconists carries 1,400 types of cigars in 700 styles. Owner Mario Cruz serves many third-generation customers.
    PAUL KITAGAKI JR. | pkitagaki@sacbee.com
  • 7N1BURLINGAME.JPG
    Books Inc. has 12 outlets in the Bay Area, but the Burlingame store reflects the high-tech interests of the locals.
    PAUL KITAGAKI JR. | pkitagaki@sacbee.com
  • Burlingmame Travel
    Gary Doss started the the Burlingame Museum of Pez Memorabilia in Burlingame, Calif., February 23, 2012. The museum carries many vintage and new Pez dispensers and products. The world's largest Pez dispensing machine. left, stands 7 feet, 10 inches and was awarded the Guinness World record for largest candy dispenser.
    Paul Kitagaki Jr. | pkitagaki@sacbee.com
  • Burlingmame Travel
    Carol Bowen, left, is helped by Nancy Cervera as she purchases pastries at Copenhagen Bakery & Cafe, in Burlingame, Calif., February 23, 2012.
    Paul Kitagaki Jr. | pkitagaki@sacbee.com
  • Buddy Owens and the Bakersfield sound

    BAKERSFIELD

    Bakersfield arch that was moved by Buck Owens to current position next to the Crystal Palace. Travel story looks into the Bakersfield sound, the Telecaster-rich style of country music made famous by Bakersfield's Buck Owens.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.
    Lezlie Sterling | lsterling@sacbee.com
  • 7N18BAKER3.JPG
    Buddy Alan Owens plays the Crystal Palace in Bakersfield, founded by his dad, Buck. They perform together on the screen, upper right.
    LEZLIE STERLING | lsterling@sacbee.com
  • Buddy Owens and the Bakersfield sound
    A musician walks down the streets of downtown Bakersfield. Travel story looks at the Bakersfield sound, the Telecaster-rich style of country music made famous by Bakersfield's Buck Owens.
    Lezlie Sterling | lsterling@sacbee.com
  • Buddy Owens and the Bakersfield sound
    Buddy Alan Owens, the son of Buck Owens plays at the Crystal Palace with the Buckaroos in Bakersfield. Travel story looks into the Bakersfield sound, the Telecaster-rich style of country music made famous by Bakersfield's Buck Owens.
    Lezlie Sterling | lsterling@sacbee.com
  • RB Monterey

    MONTEREY

    The Monterey Peninsula includes more than a dozen cities and hamlets. Much of the area's beauty is well documented, but treasures are still to be found.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    Among the many sights at Monterey Bay is the old Fisherman’s Wharf and these pelicans.
    Randall Benton | The Sacramento Bee
  • 7N25MONTEREY3.JPG
    A bicyclist pedals past an extensive mural last month near Lovers Point in Pacific Grove, just north of Monterey.
    RANDALL BENTON | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N25MONTEREY2.JPG
    Audra Krebs enjoys breakfast at Rosine's in Monterey on a recent weekday. The owners moved the restaurant to Alvarado Street in Monterey in the mid-1980s.
    RANDALL BENTON | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 7N25MONTEREY.JPG
    Among the many sights at Monterey Bay is the old Fisherman’s Wharf and the many boats moored nearby. Much of the area’s beauty is well documented, but treasures are still to be found.
    RANDALL BENTON | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • RB Monterey
    Manager Evelyn Rosales, left, and co-worker Jose Lafayette interact with regular customers Bruce "Caddy" Ingels, Emilio Cal and Glenn Topper at Red's Donuts in Monterey on Tuesday, February 21, 2012.
    Randall Benton | The Sacramento Bee
  • 7N4MISSIONJMP3.JPG

    SAN FRANCISCO'S MISSION DISTRICT

    Stroll, do not power walk, down Balmy Alley here in the Mission District. Slow your overcaffeinated pulse from too many espressos in neighborhood cafes, quell your fired-up metabolism from super burritos scarfed in corner taquerias, empty your mind of the thrift store bargains beckoning on the boulevard.

    Tranquilo, amigo.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    The famous La Taqueria, said to be one of the most authentic of San Francisco's taquerias, is on a colorful stretch of Mission Street near 25th.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N4MISSIONJMP.JPG
    There's a lot to see in San Francisco's Mission District, including Balmy Alley, a blocklong collection of murals both personal and political.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N4MISSIONJMP2.JPG
    Pedestrians walk or smooch along colorful 24th Street in the Mission District. The Mission, perhaps not quite as famous as other districts of San Francisco, nevertheless is filled with interesting things to see and do.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • A look at San Francisco Mission District
    Street art along Balmy Alley at 24th Street in the San Francisco Mission District. Murals bith personal and political line this block-long alley that borders a neighborhood and a park. The Mission not as famous as the touristy Fisherman's Wharf or a gay icon like the Castro or as high brow as Nob Hill or the Sunset District, but it's a fascinating mix of urban hipsters and longtime ethnic locals.
    Manny Crisostomo | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.

    NAPA

    Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    A skateboarder passes by a mural of the Napa River painted on the side of as building on Main Street in downtown Napa.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    A man and his children enjoy the recently updated Napa Riverwalk. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Twenty-year Napa resident Don Haagstad enjoys a beer at a restaurant on the River Walk. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    The historic Uptown Theatre on Third Street in downtown Napa provides a wonderful venue for many musicians. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Cameron Darlington places fresh oysters in ice at Hog Island Oysters Co. inside the Oxbow Public Market. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    People eat and shop inside the Oxbow Public Market. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    New building has sprouted up along Main Street in downtown Napa. Long neglected by tourists who flocked to wineries, Napa's downtown is suddenly the place to eat, lounge and be seen.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N12DISCOVERIES.JPG

    CHICO


    The National Yo-Yo Museum, housed in the back of a downtown Chico eclectic toy store and boutique, Bird in Hand, is certainly no myth – though some of the yo-yo aces honored therein certainly border on the mythic.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    Thad Winzenz demonstrates a yo-yo trick in front of a 256-pound wooden specimen at the National Yo-Yo Museum in Chico.
    Jason Halley
  • 7N12TREK.JPG
    Hikers in Chico's Upper Bidwell Park follow a trail up from a diversion dam on Chico Creek.
    Ty Barbour | Chico Enterprise-Record
  • 7N29GUERNE.JPG

    GUERNEVILLE


    This verdant, leafy outpost on the banks of the Russian River proved as eclectic as it was charming, a pastiche of Northern California culture, a time capsule preserving several seminal historical epochs. You might be tempted only to breeze by Guerneville on a day trip in the wine country or to the coast, but the town offers a plethora of weekend possibilities.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    Fishermen try their luck in the Russian River, an old friend and occasional foe to the residents of Guerneville and others who live near its banks.
    RANDY PENCH | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N29GUERNE2.JPG
    Guerneville has a lot to offer folks from just about every walk of life with an outdoorsy, funky style.
    RANDY PENCH | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Guerneville known for its Russian River
    Guerneville, along main street at sunset.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Guerneville known for its Russian River
    Dick Jaillet of Guerneville stands outside the Rainbow Cattle Co. bar on Main Street.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Guerneville known for its Russian River
    Joe Villagomez, left, of Guerneville and Jimmy Kufudakes fish for steelhead on the Russian River.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • 7N22PESCAJMP3.JPG

    PESCADERO


    Pescadero harbors a quiet paradise of mild climate, great views and memorable food.

    Read the story here.
    View the gallery here.

    Pigeon Point Lighthouse is one landmark near Pescadero. Your visit won't get you too close because of age-related structural problems (it was built in 1872), but the nongovernmental, nonprofit California State Parks Foundation is working to raise funds to rebuild.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N22PESCAJMP4.JPG
    A curious goat looks over the fence at Harley Farms, run by Dee Harley, a Yorkshire transplant who fell in love with Pescadero more than two decades ago.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N22PESCAJMP.JPG
    A quiet scene at Pescadero Marsh Preserve, a web of trails where small birds are likely to flit amid 200 plant species.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N22PESCADERO.JPG
    The sun sets at Pescadero State Beach off Highway 1, a few miles west of the San Mateo County town.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
  • 7N22PESCADERO2.JPG
    Artichoke linguine at Duarte’s Tavern in Pescadero is one of many tasty treats offered by the landmark eatery, in the small downtown area, inland from Highway 1.
    MANNY CRISOSTOMO | mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
Sacramento Bee Job listing powered by Careerbuilder.com
Quick Job Search
Buy
Used Cars
Dealer and private-party ads
Make:

Model:

Price Range:
to
Search within:
miles of ZIP

Advanced Search | 1982 & Older

Sacramentoconnect.com SacWineRegion.com SacMomsclub.com SacPaws.com BeeBuzz Points Find n Save