Plants without fuss: Durable delightsLoading
  • GIHOFRTM.4
    Giant striped eulalia grass
    Miscanthus sinensis ‘Cosmopolitan’
    Size: Up to 8 feet tall.
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.
    Bloom season: Late summer, fall.
    Pruning needs: Little or none; cut down to the ground in winter to renew.
    Water needs: After established, water deeply every one to two weeks.
    Snapshot: Considered among the royalty of the grass kingdom, this large miscanthus is a good substitute for invasive pampas grass. And this grass only needs to be mowed once a year. Also called Silver Feather, this stately grass with variegated leaves can be a major focal point in the dry garden. It creates a large statement near entryways or at the back of the border. Cream-striped leaves emerge in spring and quickly grow to 6 to 8 feet. In late summer, they’re topped with bronze tassel-like flowers that toss in the wind. Its graceful foliage and plumelike flowers look like a living fountain, cascading above shorter plants. You can see examples at the UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • GEENJAD0.7xxx
    Small cape rush
    Chondropetalum tectorum
    Size: Under 3 feet tall.
    Bloom season: Summer and fall.
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune back in winter to renew.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply twice a month; cape rush appreciates a little extra water in spring.
    Snapshot: Cape rush is an unusual plant from South Africa with evergreen stems and chocolate-colored grasslike flower spikes. Adding movement to the dry garden, it creates a fountain 2 to 3 feet tall that sways in the wind. Small cape rush grows to half the size of standard cape rush Chondropetalum elephantinum, which can reach 6 feet tall. This perennial contrasts nicely with silver-leaved plants and colorful flowers. You can see specimens in several locations on the UC Davis campus, such as near the Arboretum’s Gazebo. Small cape rush also is a popular addition to new water-efficient landscaping near the Robert Mondavi Institute for Wine and Food Science.
    Ellen Zagory
  • Island live oaksss
    Island live oak
    Quercus tomentella
    Size: Up to 65 feet.
    Bloom season: Spring.
    Exposure: Full sun.
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month or not at all.
    Snapshot: Also known as Channel Island oak, this rare native tree grows in the wild only on the Channel Islands of California and is not usually available for home gardens. Once common on the mainland as well as the islands, this evergreen oak has become endangered in its native habitat by overgrazing. With clean, dark green leaves, it forms a beautiful and drought-tolerant conical tree that makes an excellent accent or screen in home landscapes. This oak bears attractive acorns in fall. You can see specimens in the arboretum’s Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California native plants and the Carolee Shields White Flower Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • GBSLFL33.5sss
    Moss verbena
    Verbena tenuisecta
    Size: Under 1 foot.
    Bloom season: Spring, summer and fall
    Pruning needs: Remove old flower stalks for tidy appearance and to encourage more flowers.
    Exposure: Prefers full sun; will tolerate afternoon shade.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: Want bees and butterflies to spend more time in your garden? A favorite for pollinators, this colorful evergreen perennial — which is often treated as a mounding annual — makes a great ground cover or border, blanketing beds with pretty purple flowers from late spring into fall. The finely cut leaves are attractive, too. With trailing growth and plentiful blooms, it also looks attractive in a hanging basket or container; the foliage and flowers spill delicately over the edge of the pot. Ideal for Sacramento, easy-care verbena loves heat, sun and well-drained soil, but will still bloom in areas with afternoon shade. You can see specimens in the arboretum’s Ruth Risdon Storer Garden of Valley-Wise Plants on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • GDVKOL7B.4xxx
    Elk Blue California rush
    Juncus patens “Elk Blue”
    Size: Under 2 feet.
    Bloom season: Spring, summer, fall.
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade.
    Pruning needs: Little or none; cut close to ground in winter to renew.
    Water needs: After established, water twice a month.
    Snapshot: This pretty California native is a natural for low-water gardens. Frost tolerant down to 15 degrees, California rush thrives in many challenging situations from dry shade to full sun with its roots 4 inches deep in pond water. (The more water it gets, the bigger the rush grows.) In the home landscape, rushes are especially useful to create strong vertical accents in low-maintenance plantings. The bluish tint to the foliage of this variety creates a lovely exclamation point for the front of plantings or in poorly drained soils. Rushes can be cut to the ground to rejuvenate them as needed. This evergreen perennial is well adapted to our hot, dry summers and wet winters. In addition to its attractive foliage, this variety bears small gold-brown flowers midstalk from spring through fall. You can see specimens in the Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California native plants in the UC Davis Arboretum on campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • Spirit viburnum
    Viburnum tinus ‘Spirit’
    Size: Under 3 feet
    Bloom season: Late winter, spring
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape and keep compact.
    Water needs: After established, water deeply once a week.
    Snapshot: Also called “laurustinus,” this handsome and long-lived evergreen shrub is one of the best — and toughest — candidates for creating garden screens or hedges. With good-looking dark green foliage year round, Spirit pumps out loads of tiny light pink flowers in later winter. The blooms are followed by abundant dark blue berries. This new dwarf variety fits perfectly in urban or suburban landscapes. Instead of growing more than 6 feet tall, Spirit stays very compact – just 3 feet tall and 3 feet wide. You can see specimens in the arboretum’s Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • G9VHNPRB.4sss
    Shrubby hare’s ear
    Bupleurum fruticosum
    Size: Under 4 feet tall
    Bloom season: Summer, early fall
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Remove old flower stalks after bloom.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once a week.
    Snapshot: This unusual, graceful and evergreen shrub grows well in many different locations. It forms a bushy shrub about 4 feet wide and tall with narrow, oval, waxy, blue-green foliage. Shrubby hare’s ear produces masses of lime-green, tiny flowers in large clusters shaped like upside-down umbrellas. For full sun and infrequent irrigation situations, the 3- or 4-inch blooms are a welcome sight in summer and fall, and interesting when used in flower arrangements. You can see specimens in the Mediterranean collection as well as the Ruth Risdon Storer Garden of the UC Davis Arboretum on the university’s campus.
    Owen Brewer | The Sacramento Bee
  • Pink muhly grass
    Muhlenbergia capillaris
    Size: 3 to 5 feet tall
    Bloom season: Late summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Remove old flower stalks. To renew, cut clump back to ground in early spring.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month.
    Snapshot: It’s hard to find a tougher or more adaptable ornamental grass. A native of Florida, pink muhly tolerates salt, heat and drought as well as flooding, making it an ideal choice for coastal or riverside landscapes. With its pretty pink cloudlike flowers, it makes a dramatic mass planting with very little maintenance. The fine foliage turns coppery in fall, adding more interest. This muhly grows best in sandy or rocky soil. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden of the UC Davis Arboretum on campus.
    Ellen Zagory | UC Davis
  • GNBGU6F6.3xx
    California fuchsia
    Epilobium canum
    Size: 1 to 3 feet tall
    Bloom season: Summer and full
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Cut to the ground in late fall or winter after flowering to renew.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month.
    Snapshot: In constant demand at UC Davis nursery sales, this perennial ranks among the most popular plants propagated by arboretum volunteers. In the hottest heat, this California native keeps putting out brilliant, lipstick-shaped flowers throughout summer and into fall. Tough and reliable, it’s easy to grow and tolerates high temperatures and drought. Different varieties have interesting leaves, too, ranging from silver to bright green and narrow to broad. For example, the Sierra Salmon variety has salmon-pink flowers instead of the more common red-orange. Sierra Salmon also stays more compact, under 2 feet tall. You can see specimens in the UC Davis Arboretum’s Mary Wattis Brown Garden of California native plants on campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • 6N3DELIGHT
    Winnifred Gilman Cleveland sage
    Salvia clevelandii "Winnifred Gilman"
    Size: Under 4 feet tall
    Bloom season: Spring and summer
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Remove old flower stalks in summer after bloom. Prune to maintain a compact form.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month.
    Snapshot: This California native is a woody evergreen shrub that grows up to 4 feet tall and 4 feet wide. It produces maroon-stemmed, brilliant blue-violet flowers from mid-spring to early summer. The gray-green leaves have a deliciously strong fragrance. This variety of Cleveland sage particularly likes Sacramento's weather. It is heat- and drought- tolerant – but not for gardens where water pools in winter. It can't stand soggy roots. Hummingbirds and butterflies love this evergreen shrub. You can see specimens in the UC Davis Arboretum Teaching Nursery on campus.
  • 6N27DELIGHT
    Variegated Japanese sedge
    Carex oshimensis "Evergold"
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Early summer
    Exposure: Partial to full shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once a week.
    Snapshot: This tough variegated sedge can brighten up the dry shade garden. Creamy striped leaves form a beautiful evergreen mound, contrasting and creating accents among darker green-leaved ground covers. This graceful, grasslike sedge grows in well-behaved clumps and loves shady places in the dry garden. Easy to care for and drought-tolerant, this sedge is ideal for rock gardens or borders. In woodland settings, it's deer resistant, too. You can see specimens near the gazebo in the arboretum's Carolee Shields All-White Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Maureen Gilmer
  • 6N20DELIGHT
    Amber Velvet kangaroo paw
    Anigozathos 'Amber Velvet'
    Size: Under 4 feet tall
    Bloom season: Spring, summer and fall
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Remove flower stems after blooming.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once a week.
    Snapshot: A native of Australia (as you might expect), kangaroo paw is a spiky perennial that produces curious flowers resembling furry little "paws" on elongated stems up to 3 feet tall. More frost tolerant than some previously available varieties, Amber Velvet – which has golden flowers – also has upright, dark green foliage that forms a 2-foot evergreen clump; that makes this drought-tolerant perennial a useful accent among low-growing plants. In addition, the profuse tubular flowers attract bees and beneficial insects. You can see specimens in the Arboretum's South Australian collection on the east end of the University of California, Davis, campus.
    Michael Allen Jones | Bee file
  • 6N13DELIGHT
    Striped agave
    Agave americana "Variegata"
    Size: Under 5 feet tall
    Bloom season: Seldom flowers
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month.
    Snapshot: The striped agave provides a dramatic focal point in sunny spots where water is unavailable. Growing only half the size of other large agave species, it's more adaptable to today's smaller landscapes. The most common of the variegated agaves, this striped beauty has impressive (and pointy) gray-green leaves with creamy, yellow-white stripes on the margins – along with saw-toothed edges. The leaves curve gracefully to form a spectacular rosette. Native to northeastern Mexico, this perennial loves sun (south or east exposures are ideal) and well-drained soil. Hardy to 20 degrees, it prefers a location protected from too much rain in winter. It also makes an attractive container plant. You can see specimens in the arboretum teaching nursery on the UC Davis campus.
    Randall Benton | rbenton@sacbee.com
  • 6N6DELIGHT
    Biokovo cranesbill geranium
    Geranium x cantabrigiense "Biokovo"
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Spring and early summer
    Exposure: Partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; to renew, cut back after flowering.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: A true hardy geranium, this tough evergreen groundcover has attractive, shiny scalloped leaves and produces delicate pale-pink flowers in spring. A marvelous shade plant, it survives infrequent irrigation. It keeps the dry shade garden looking fresh and lush on the hottest of summer days. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Florence Low Bee file, 2008
  • 6N29DELIGHT
    Cerise hardy ice plant
    Delosperma cooperi
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Spring, summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none; to renew, cut back after flowering
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: This hardy ground cover is a longtime California favorite. Native to South Africa, ice plant thrives in well-drained soil and full sun. It tolerates shallow or rocky soil, too – just about anything but heavy clay. Once established, it needs very little care. The apple-green foliage creeps close to the ground. In late spring, incredibly showy waves of bright purple-red iridescent flowers blanket the plants. Unlike many succulent ground covers, this variety is cold hardy, too. At UC Davis, it sailed through last winter's subfreezing temperatures unscathed. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Florence Low | Bee file
  • 6N22DELIGHT
    Evergreen candytuft
    Iberis sempervirens
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Spring, summer
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; to renew, cut back after flowering
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: Forming soft mounds, this is a very dependable and easy-care evergreen perennial. Candytuft will flourish in either sun or partial shade with just a little water. In spring, it's covered with clean white flowers that add sparkle to any landscape. One of the most adaptable garden perennials around, this ground cover can take a wide spectrum of light and water conditions. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Owen Brewer | Bee file
  • x
    Mexican deergrass
    Muhlenbergia dubia
    Size: 2 to 3 feet tall
    Bloom season: Summer
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; cut to ground every three years to renew
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: This dependable ornamental grass often makes gardeners' lists of cast-iron favorites. A tailored cousin of California's native deergrass, the Mexican variety pairs perfectly with flowering perennials such as salvias. With its upright growth, this deergrass makes a great accent plant for a low-water garden. It requires very little maintenance, too. The delicate, feathery flower stalks stick around all summer and well into fall. Strappy leaves add more texture and movement to garden spaces. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen ZagoryUCdavis Arboretum
  • 6N8DELIGHT
    Mexican blue sage
    Salvia chamaedryoides
    Size: Under 2 feet tall
    Bloom season: Spring, summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape and keep compact form.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month.
    Snapshot: Also called germander sage, this low-growing shrubby sage produces masses of unusually clear blue flowers from late spring through fall. Small, rounded gray leaves cover the handsome evergreen shrub, which tends to hug the ground and can reach 4 feet wide. Native to the high desert of Mexico, this easy-care sage loves the sun, and its bright-blue flowers bring the sky down to earth in the low-water garden, creating a mass of gray and blue. And beneficial insects love it, too. Hardy down to 20 degrees, this sage looks excellent with yellow-blooming plants such as Euryops; that plant combination can be seen on campus along Old Davis Road. "We planted that salvia one year ago and haven't done a thing to it – and it still looks great," said Ellen Zagory, the arboretum's horticulture director. "It's just fabulous." You also can see specimens in the arboretum's Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | UC Davis Arboretum
  • 6N1DELIGHT
    Ed Carman's rosemary Rosmarinus officinalis "Mozart" Size: Under 3 feet tall Bloom season: Spring, summer, fall Exposure: Full sun to partial shade Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape and keep compact form Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month. Snapshot: This evergreen shrub doesn't just look great; it tastes great, too. Besides providing oil-rich rosemary for cooking, this variety – known as Ed Carman's or Mozart rosemary – pumps out loads of the darkest blue flowers of any rosemary. This is a true Durable Delight; rosemary ranks as one of the toughest low-maintenance plants for any garden. This low, spreading variety grows to 2 to 3 feet tall and 4 to 5 feet wide. The compact shrub blooms profusely from early spring into summer, then offers a second wave of flowers in fall. That makes it very attractive to bees. You can see specimens in the arboretum's Teaching Nursery demonstration gardens, the Mediterranean Collection and the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory
  • 6N25DELIGHT
    Texas ranger
    Leucophyllum frutescens "Compacta" or "Green Cloud"
    Size:/a Under 6 feet tall
    Bloom season: Late spring, summer
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape and control growth
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: This dense-growing, medium-sized shrub has fuzzy, gray-green leaves all year with showy, bright lavender-violet flowers that bloom spring and summer. It tolerates heat, wind and alkaline soil, and can be clipped to shape or grown as a loose hedge. The Compacta and Green Cloud varieties stay smaller than other Texas rangers. Both attract bees and other beneficial insects. You can see them in the arboretum's Southwestern collection on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | Special to The Bee
  • 6N18DELIGHT
    Marshall's Memory oregano
    Origanum "Marshall's Memory"
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none; cut to base in winter.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: An unusual ornamental hybrid oregano, this groundcover produces a mass of delicate pink-purple flowers on a mat of medium-green leaves. Tough and drought- tolerant, it wants full sun and likes the heat – including south- or west-facing exposures. A plus: This oregano will attract butterflies with its nectar. Another benefit: This pretty oregano makes an attractive dried flower for arrangements. You can see specimens in the arboretum's teaching nursery on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | Special to The Bee
  • 6N11DELIGHTNU
    Dwarf Russian sage
    Perovskia atriplicifolia "Little Spire"
    Size: Under 2 feet tall
    Bloom season: Summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none; cut to base in winter.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: Able to thrive in the most harsh environments, dwarf Russian sage is a deciduous perennial that is tough and heat-tolerant. It can even withstand deer and rabbits. "Little Spire" is smaller and more compact than other varieties. It rewards gardeners with vertical spikes of showy purple blooms in summer that last until frost in late fall. Drought-tolerant, it needs well-drained soil and full sun to be at its best. To renew its annual show, cut the plant to the base in winter. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Bigstock Photo
  • 7N4DELIGHT
    Giant ajuga or bugleweed
    Ajuga reptans "Catlin's Giant"
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Spring and early summer
    Exposure: Full sun to full shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; remove spent flowers; divide every three years.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: Related to mint, this attractive ground cover – also known as carpet bugle – is remarkably tough. Forming a dense mat that blocks out weeds, ajuga tolerates all kinds of soil conditions, helps control erosion and makes itself at home in sun or shade. The scalloped foliage hugs the ground, staying under 3 inches tall. The dark-bronze leaves tend to be smaller in full sun but can make an unusual border along paths. This ajuga can be used to edge container plantings, spilling over the sides. In late spring, 6-inch spikes of vibrant blue flowers attract beneficial insects – especially butterflies. Another plus: Deer don't like ajuga and tend to leave it alone. The one drawback: Its underground runners can be invasive. You can see specimens outside the arboretum's headquarters and in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | Special to The Bee
  • 6N27DELIGHT
    Golden yarrow
    Achillea "Coronation Gold"
    Size: Under 2 feet tall
    Bloom season: Summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune after flowering to keep tidy.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: A longtime favorite of gardeners in hot summer climates, this low-water perennial has feathery, silver-gray foliage that produces tall golden flat-topped flowers in early summer. It is a great plant for flower arrangements and native-pollinator conservation. Easy-care and sun-loving, this yarrow becomes a magnet for beneficial insects. At home in a container or garden border, this clumping variety holds its bright-yellow color for weeks before turning a burnished fall gold – which makes an excellent dried flower. You can see specimens in the arboretum's teaching nursery on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | UC Davis Arboretum
  • 6N20DELIGHT
    Hybrid soapwort
    Saponaria x lempergii 'Max Frei'
    Size: Under 1 foot tall
    Bloom season: Summer, fall
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to maintain compact shape.
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks.
    Snapshot: Hybrid soapwort has pretty, pink flowers that bloom through summer into autumn. Dependable in even the hottest weather, this low-growing perennial is perfect for rock gardens or around roses and taller plants. Its low-maintenance and low-water needs make it ideal in Sacramento. You can see specimens in the arboretum's teaching nursery on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | Special to The Bee
  • 6N13DELIGHT
    Evie's silk tassel
    Garrya elliptica "Evie"
    Size: 6 to 10 feet tall
    Bloom season: Late winter, early spring
    Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
    Pruning needs: Little or none; prune to shape
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply every two weeks
    Snapshot: Also called coast silk tassel, this slow-growing native shrub grows in the coastal ranges of Northern California and southern Oregon. Tolerant of drought, salt and wind, it thrives in dry, well-drained soils but can handle summer water, too. This evergreen shrub can grow as wide as it is tall with a well-rounded shape and makes an excellent screen or informal hedge. Cascading flowers give this bush its silky nickname. In late winter, foot-long catkins of creamy-white flowers with a maroon tinge hang like silk tassels from the branches. You can see specimens in the Arboretum Terrace Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | UC Davis Arboretum
  • 6N6DELIGHT
    Dasylirion wheeleri (Desert spoon)
    Size: Under 4 feet tall
    Bloom season: Spring and summer
    Exposure: Full sun
    Pruning needs: Little or none
    Water needs: Once established, water deeply once or twice a month – or not at all.
    Snapshot: This attractive desert dweller also is an Arboretum All-Star. Native to southern Arizona, desert spoon has found a home in drought-tolerant gardens as an almost-no-care accent plant. That also made it a surefire candidate for the new Durable Delights collection. This evergreen has long narrow blue-gray leaves that radiate from a woody base to form a spiky globe. Cream-colored flowers emerge in summer on tall spikes that can reach 15 feet tall on mature plants. It is drought and frost tolerant, surviving temperatures several degrees below freezing, and makes a striking accent plant. Because it tolerates cold winter nights at elevations up to 6,000 feet, this shrub thrives where agaves won't. Specimens grow 4 feet tall and almost as wide. One caution: Its attractive, silver-blue foliage has sharp, sawtooth edges. The plant gets its name from its spoon-shaped base. You can see specimens in the Ruth Risdon Storer Valley-Wise Garden on the UC Davis campus.
    Ellen Zagory | UC Davis Arboretum
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