Wrangling the bear issue around Lake TahoeLoading
  • Black bears on the hot seat in Lake Tahoe
    A black bear, with a stash of garbage which he has collected hangs out in the safety of a pine tree and bushes behind a pizza restaurant in Kings Beach, Calif. on Tuesday, September 24, 2013.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Black bears on the hot seat in Lake Tahoe
    BEAR League executive director Ann Bryant stands ready with her paintball gun (she uses chalk balls instead of paint balls) should she need to scare a black bear which hangs out in the safety of a pine tree and bushes behind a pizza restaurant in Kings Beach, Calif. on Tuesday, September 24, 2013. Bryant finds herself in the middle of another bear controversy in Lake Tahoe, especially in Incline Village where residents are again fed up with the intrusion of the black bears.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Black bears on the hot seat in Lake Tahoe
    A black bear hangs out in the safety of a pine tree and bushes behind a pizza restaurant in Kings Beach, Calif. on Tuesday, September 24, 2013. BEAR League executive director Ann Bryant finds herself in the middle of another bear controversy in Lake Tahoe, especially in Incline Village where residents are again fed up with the intrusion of the black bears.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Black bears on the hot seat in Lake Tahoe
    BEAR League executive director Ann Bryant talks to APizza Bella restaurant owner Rick Buhler behind his restaurant where a black bear hangs out in the safety of a pine tree and bushes in Kings Beach, Calif. on Tuesday, September 24, 2013. Bryant finds herself in the middle of another bear controversy in Lake Tahoe, especially in Incline Village where residents are again fed up with the intrusion of the black bears.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Black bears on the hot seat in Lake Tahoe
    BEAR League executive director Ann Bryant, right, keeps an eye on a black bear which hangs out in the safety of a pine tree and bushes behind a pizza restaurant in Kings Beach, Calif. on Tuesday, September 24, 2013. Bryant finds herself in the middle of another bear controversy in Lake Tahoe, especially in Incline Village where residents are again fed up with the intrusion of the black bears.
    Randy Pench | rpench@sacbee.com
  • Carl Lackey, a bear biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, pulls a sedated bear from a culvert trap in Incline Village, to begin processing it for relocation. The bear was spotted the day before looking for food near vehicles.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • Carl Lackey, a Nevada bear biologist, handles a three-year-old male that will later be released into the wild near Lake Tahoe. Officials estimate there are 100 to 300 bears on the Nevada side of the lake and 200 to 300 on the California side.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • Carl Lackey, a Nevada bear biologist, with a three-year-old male. Over the years, Lackey has responded to more than 3,500 human-bear conflicts, handled bears more than 900 times and euthanized about 80. His actions have drawn the ire of pro-bear activists.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • The bear was sedated with the drug Telazol which immobilizes the animal. It can still hear, which is why Lackey, the Nevada bear biologist, worked quietly while processing it.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • In addition to snapping ear tags and a micro-chip, this bear got tattooed. That way, if its ear tags fall off, it can still be identified.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • Carl Lackey, a bear biologist with the Nevada Department of Wildlife, inspects the teeth of a bear to estimate its age. This bear was about 3-year-old.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • A close-up look at the rear foot of a bear. Black bear numbers are booming in California and Nevada. Officials estimate there are 25,000 to 30,000 animals in California and 400 to 700 in Nevada.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • A live black bear inside a culvert trap in Incline Village. It was released alive the next day. Lake Tahoe activists say wildlife authorities in Nevada are killing too many of the animals.
    Tom Knudson | tknudson@sacbee.com
  • Culvert traps, like this one, are used to capture problem bears alive. Pro-bear activists have thwarted wardens this year in Incline Village by rallying around traps to scare bears away or, in some cases, dumping Pine-Sol, a bear deterrent, on them.
  • A bear bolts for freedom with dogs on its heels and the sound of non-lethal shotgun rounds in its ears. The process, known as aversive conditioning, is designed to make bears afraid of people.
  • A Karelian bear dog pursues a bear just after it is released from a culvert trap into mountains outside Incline Village.
  • After a short chase, the bear climbed a tree; when dogs and people left, it climbed back down and ran off into the mountains.
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