Hometown Report: And when it came to pass, Aliotti fumed

Published: Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 - 12:00 am | Page 2C
Last Modified: Tuesday, Oct. 22, 2013 - 7:48 am

Nick Aliotti delivered a verbal roasting first.

The Oregon Ducks' defensive coordinator with UC Davis ties blasted Washington State coach Mike Leach on Saturday night for having "no class." Aliotti was infuriated that Leach had the audacity to instruct Connor Halliday to keep throwing in the fourth quarter of a Pacific-12 Conference contest in Eugene, Ore., which the second-ranked Ducks won 62-38.

That's right. The winning team railed on the losing team for continuing to throw in a lopsided game, making for the most unusual news conference in college football this season – maybe ever, given the situation.

Aliotti somehow expected that when his star cornerback, Terrance Mitchell from Burbank High School, returned an interception 51 yards for a touchdown and a 62-24 lead early in the fourth quarter, the Cougars would take a knee and surrender. WSU kept passing, kept competing. Mitchell's interception, his fourth of the year, came on Halliday's 64th attempt. He finished with an NCAA-record 89 attempts and threw for two more touchdowns to soften the final score a bit.

Then Aliotti went off.

"That's total (baloney) that (Leach) threw the ball at the end of the game like he did," Aliotti said in a televised news conference. "And you can print that, and you can send it to him, and he can comment, too. I think it's low class, and it's (baloney) to throw the ball when the game is completely over against our kids that are basically our scout team.

"In the end, he's still throwing at a time when most guys would try to end the game and go home," Aliotti said, pausing and then adding, "I am stunned he would keep his quarterback and crew in there. And still he threw the ball with 20 seconds left. But he did. They want stats, they got stats. But we got the most important stat, and that's the 'W' – and we are happy about that."

After television and radio sports commentators blasted the coach for his absurd comments, Aliotti apologized to Leach on Monday in a prepared statement. It read in part: "I'm embarrassed that I got caught up in the moment after the game. There's no excuse, but sometimes right after the game the adrenaline is still flowing, and I made a huge human error in judgment. I promise it won't happen again."

Said Leach in a text to The Seattle Times: "I don't criticize other teams or coaches. I focus on coaching my team."

Beavers rising

Tyler Trosin of Folsom has caught three touchdown passes in a game three times this season for American River College, ranked third in the state. The latest came Saturday in a 50-27 triumph over San Joaquin Delta that improved the Beavers to 6-0.

The sophomore, who set Northern California career receiving marks at Folsom High School, has 12 receiving touchdowns and an 89-yard kickoff return.

ARC is aiming for its second undefeated season in four years.

Roadrunner's running

Robert Frazier, a 2,000-yard rusher for Elk Grove in 2012, has 453 yards and three scores for Butte (6-0), ranked first in the state.

The Roadrunners could face ARC for the NorCal title.

Richards' time

Stanford safety Jordan Richards of Folsom had two interceptions and 10 tackles in Saturday's 24-10 victory over UCLA to earn the Pac-12 Defensive Player of the Week honor.

Stanford coach David Shaw called the junior "dominant."

UCLA freshman defensive end Eddie Vanderdoes (Placer) had 11 tackles.

Eighth-ranked Stanford hosts No. 2 Oregon on Thursday, Nov. 7.

Follow Joe Davidson on Twitter @SacBee_JoeD, check out his PrepsPlus Insider every Monday at blogs.sacbee.com/preps and listen to his "Extra Point" every Wednesday on ESPN Radio 1320.

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