JFK's image shines on despite contradictionsLoading
  • JFKs Images
    In this October 1960 file photo Sen. John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, campaign in New York. The Kennedy image, the "mystique" that attracts tourists and historians alike, did not begin with his presidency and is in no danger of ending 50 years after his death. Its journey has been uneven, but resilient - a young and still-evolving politician whose name was sanctified by his assassination, upended by discoveries of womanizing, hidden health problems and political intrigue, and forgiven in numerous polls that place JFK among the most beloved of former presidents.
    AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this Aug. 21, 1960 file photo, illuminated by a spotlight, Sen. John F. Kennedy, Democratic presidential nominee, speaks to an audience in Des Moines, Iowa.
    AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this July 25, 1960 file photo , Sen. John F. Kennedy, D-Mass., sits with wife, Jacqueline, as she reads to their daughter, Caroline, at Hyannis Port, Mass.
    AP
  • JFKs Images
    First lady Jacqueline Kennedy and President John F. Kennedy stand at attention during the playing of the national anthem at start of a reception during their state visit to Mexico City, Mexico, on June 30, 1962.
    HENRY BURROUGHS | AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this Nov. 13, 1963 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy and first lady Jacqueline Kennedy sit with their children, John Jr. and Caroline, on a portico overlooking the White House South Lawn in Washington. In background is British Ambassador David Ormsby Gore.
    Uncredited | AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this Aug. 7, 1960 file photo, Democratic presidential nominee Sen. John Kennedy and wife Jacqueline sit in their sailboat in Hyannis Port, Mass.
    Anonymous | AP
  • CORRECTION JFKs Images
    In this Jan. 5, 1938 file photo, Joseph P. Kennedy, left, U.S. Ambassador to Great Britain, stands with his son, John F. Kennedy, in New York. Kennedy, born in 1917, was the second son, and one of nine children, of business tycoon Joseph P. Kennedy. When first son Joseph Jr. was killed during World War II, Jack became the designated heir. Himself a Navy veteran and survivor of a collision with a Japanese destroyer, he would write to his friend Paul Fay that, once the war was over, "I'll be back here with Dad trying to parlay a lost PT boat and a bad back into a political advantage."
    AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this Jan. 18, 1962 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy looks over notes at his desk in the White House.
    Henry Burroughs | AP
  • JFKs Images
    In this Dec. 9, 1961 file photo, U.S. President John Kennedy looks out of the window from a snow-covered limousine at Andrews Air Force Base, Md. near Washington after his return from Florida.
    Byron Rollins | AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this July 3, 1963 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy stands at the lectern behind a production slate board during a television taping at the White House. In life and especially in death, Kennedy changed television forever.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this April 3, 1960 file photo, Sen. John F. Kennedy, Democratic presidential nominee, sits next to a playback of his televised appearance in Milwaukee, Wis. for the Wisconsin presidential primary two days later.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this July 26, 1963 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy sits behind microphones at his desk in Washington after finishing his radio-television broadcast to the nation on the nuclear test ban agreement initialed by negotiators in Moscow.
    John Rous | AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this Oct. 21, 1960 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate, Sen. John F. Kennedy, center left, and Republican candidate, Vice President Richard Nixon, stand in a television studio during their presidential debate in New York. Polls found those who listened on radio awarded Nixon the debate victory. Those watching on TV gave Kennedy the nod.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this Jan. 15, 1962 file photo, U.S. first lady Jacqueline Kennedy, center, checks the table setting of the White House gold service in the state dining room as she conducts a tour of the newly-restored White House for television cameras in Washington to be aired the month afterwards. More than 80 million Americans tuned in.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline Kennedy, arrive at Love Field airport in Dallas, as a television camera, above, follows them.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this Nov. 22, 1963 file photo, people line the street as the hearse bearing the body of slain U.S. President John F. Kennedy drives past a television truck as it leaves Parkland Hospital in Dallas, to be flown to Washington.
    AP
  • JFK And TV
    In this Oct. 22, 1962 file photo, U.S. President John F. Kennedy addresses the nation by television and radio from the Oval Office in Washington, announcing a U.S. naval blockade of Cuba.
    WOA | AP
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