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  • Renée C. Byer / rbyer@sacbee.com

    Three mountain lion cubs take turns drinking water on Monday December 02, 2013 in Rancho Cordova, CA. The CA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife rescued three mountain lion cubs near the town of Callahan, in Siskiyou County, after residents reported the cubs wandering around alone. The cubs are thought to be about three months old. Their mother, who would normally raise the cubs until they are 18 months old, has not been located and nobody knows what happened to her. The cubs are being cared for by DFW near Nimbus Hatchery in Rancho Cordova and the female left for Kansas to a new cat enclosure and the two males will depart for Fort Worth, TX. They will likely have to be kept in captivity for the rest of their lives. Although a new state law, SB 132, takes effect in January that allows the state to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned mountain lions, these are considered too young for rehabilitation and CA has no appropriate facilities.

  • Renée C. Byer / rbyer@sacbee.com

    Scientific Aids with the California Department of FIsh and Wildlife Jamie Sherman, left, and Jaime Rudd, right, have been help care for three mountain lion cubs on Monday December 02, 2013 in Rancho Cordova, CA. The CA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife rescued three mountain lion cubs near the town of Callahan, in Siskiyou County, after residents reported the cubs wandering around alone. The cubs are thought to be about three months old. Their mother, who would normally raise the cubs until they are 18 months old, has not been located and nobody knows what happened to her. The cubs are being cared for by DFW near Nimbus Hatchery in Rancho Cordova and the female left for Kansas to a new cat enclosure and the two males will depart for Fort Worth, TX. They will likely have to be kept in captivity for the rest of their lives. Although a new state law, SB 132, takes effect in January that allows the state to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned mountain lions, these are considered too young for rehabilitation and CA has no appropriate facilities.

  • Renée C. Byer / rbyer@sacbee.com

    One of three mountain lion cubs is lifted by Jaime Rudd, right, a Scientific Aid at the California Department of Fish and Wildlife on Monday December 02, 2013 in Rancho Cordova, CA. The CA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife rescued three mountain lion cubs near the town of Callahan, in Siskiyou County, after residents reported the cubs wandering around alone. The cubs are thought to be about three months old. Their mother, who would normally raise the cubs until they are 18 months old, has not been located and nobody knows what happened to her. The cubs are being cared for by DFW near Nimbus Hatchery in Rancho Cordova and the female left for Kansas to a new cat enclosure and the two males will depart for Fort Worth, TX. They will likely have to be kept in captivity for the rest of their lives. Although a new state law, SB 132, takes effect in January that allows the state to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned mountain lions, these are considered too young for rehabilitation and CA has no appropriate facilities.

  • Renée C. Byer / rbyer@sacbee.com

    Three mountain lion cubs await their next home at the California Department Fish and Wildlife on Monday December 02, 2013 in Rancho Cordova, CA. The CA Dept. of Fish & Wildlife rescued three mountain lion cubs near the town of Callahan, in Siskiyou County, after residents reported the cubs wandering around alone. The cubs are thought to be about three months old. Their mother, who would normally raise the cubs until they are 18 months old, has not been located and nobody knows what happened to her. The cubs are being cared for by DFW near Nimbus Hatchery in Rancho Cordova and the female left for Kansas to a new cat enclosure and the two males will depart for Fort Worth, TX. They will likely have to be kept in captivity for the rest of their lives. Although a new state law, SB 132, takes effect in January that allows the state to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned mountain lions, these are considered too young for rehabilitation and CA has no appropriate facilities.

More Information

Three mountain lion cubs rescued in Siskiyou County

Published: Tuesday, Dec. 3, 2013 - 10:33 pm
Last Modified: Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2013 - 11:57 pm

Three orphaned mountain lion cubs were held at Department of Fish and Wildlife offices in Rancho Cordova Monday after being found near the town of Callahan, in Siskiyou County, wandering around with no sign of their mother.

The cubs are thought to be about 3 months old and typically would be raised by their mother until they were 18 months old.

Too young to be rehabilitated and returned to the wild, they are bound for wildlife enclosures - the female to Kansas and the two males to Texas.

Although a new state law, Senate Bill 132, takes effect in January that allows the state to rescue and rehabilitate orphaned mountain lions, these are considered too young for rehabilitation and California does not have appropriate facilities.




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