Crimea declared independentLoading
  • Ukraine
    People gather at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law."
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    A woman, at left, reacts as she watches a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law."
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    A boy holds a Russian flag as he gathers with others at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law."
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    People gather at a square to watch a televised address by Russian President Vladimir Putin to the Federation Council, in Sevastopol, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Putin on Tuesday fiercely defended Russia's move to annex Crimea saying Crimea's vote on Sunday to join Russia was in line with "democratic norms and international law."
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • APTOPIX Russia Crimea
    Honor guards open the doors for Russian President Vladimir Putin followed by Crimean leaders entering the hall for the signing ceremony of a treaty for Crimea to join Russia, in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. President Vladimir Putin on Tuesday signed a treaty to incorporate Crimea into Russia, describing the move as the restoration of historic injustice and a necessary response to what he called the Western encroachment on Russia’s vital interests.
    Sergei Ilnitsky | AP
  • APTOPIX Russia Crimea
    From right, Russian President Vladimir Putin, Speaker of Crimean legislature Vladimir Konstantinov and Crimean Premier Sergei Aksyonov sign a treaty for Crimea to join Russia in the Kremlin in Moscow, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. With a sweep of his pen, President Vladimir Putin added Crimea to the map of Russia on Tuesday, describing the move as correcting past injustice and a response to what he called Western encroachment upon Russia's vital interests.
    Alexei Druzhinin | AP
  • Ukraine
    City council workers clear a barricade on a road leading to Kiev's Independence Square, Ukraine, Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Kiev authorities have cleared a number of barricades around Independence Square in an effort to ease traffic congestion.
    David Azia | AP
  • Ukraine
    Flowers placed on a barricade wilt near Kiev's Independence Square, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's political turmoil has become Europe's most severe security crisis in years and tensions have been high since Russian troops seized control of Crimea two weeks ago.
    David Azia | AP
  • WORLD NEWS UKRAINE MCT
    The scene in Kiev's Independence Square -- the Maidan -- on Monday, March 17, 2014, one day after Crimeans overwhelming voted to join Russia in a referendum the United States and the European Union denounced as illegitimate. The U.S. imposed sanctions on seven Russian officials and four Ukrainian ones in retaliation. The referendum was the talk of Kiev, Ukirane's capital, where the Maidan still holds the debris from months of demonstrations that led to the ouster of the government of President Viktor Yanukovych, one the sanctioned Ukrainians.
    Matthew Schofield | MCT
  • APTOPIX Ukraine
    A Ukrainian soldier stands atop an armored vehicle at a military camp near the village of Michurino, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Addressing lawmakers in Ukraine's parliament on Monday, Olexandr Turchynov, the acting president, described Sunday's Crimean poll as a farce that would "never be recognised by Ukraine and the civilised world". He also signed a decree to mobilise volunteers and reservists.
    Sergei Grits | AP
  • Ukraine
    A Ukrainian soldier stands guard at a military camp near the village of Michurino, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Addressing lawmakers in Ukraine's parliament on Monday, Olexandr Turchynov, the acting president, described Sunday's Crimean poll as a farce that would "never be recognised by Ukraine and the civilised world". He also signed a decree to mobilise volunteers and reservists.
    Sergei Grits | AP
  • Ukraine
    A Ukrainian soldier adjusts his balaclava as he guards a military camp near the village of Michurino, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Addressing lawmakers in Ukraine's parliament on Monday, Olexandr Turchynov, the acting president, described Sunday's Crimean poll as a farce that would "never be recognised by Ukraine and the civilised world". He also signed a decree to mobilise volunteers and reservists.
    Sergei Grits | AP
  • Ukraine
    Unidentified men in uniform stand outside the Donetsk regional administration building during a pro-Russian rally in Donetsk, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's new government in Kiev called Sunday's Crimea referendum a "circus" directed at gunpoint by Moscow.
    Andrey Basevych | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian demonstrators crowd around Ukrainian police during a rally in Donetsk, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's new government in Kiev called Sunday's Crimea referendum a "circus" directed at gunpoint by Moscow.
    Andrey Basevych | AP
  • Belgium EU Ukraine Diplomacy
    Pro-Ukrainian activists demonstrate during an EU foreign ministers meeting outside the EU Council in Brussels, Monday, March 17, 2014. British Foreign Secretary William Hague says he is confident that the European Union will ratchet up pressure on Russia over its role in the breakaway of Ukraine's Crimea region by imposing sanctions on people linked to the secession of the peninsula. The 28-nation EU condemned the Crimea referendum which overwhelmingly backed a return to Russia, and the EU foreign ministers were assessing on Monday who to target for asset freezes and travel bans.
    Geert Vanden Wijngaert | AP
  • Ukraine
    A woman walks between armed men in riot gear, that were performing identity and hand bag checks on people walking near the building of Crimea's regional parliament in Simferopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Crimea's parliament on Monday declared the region an independent state, after its residents voted overwhelmingly to break off from Ukraine and seek to join Russia.
    Vadim Ghirda | AP
  • Ukraine
    Women present their bags to armed men in riot gear, performing identity and hand bag checks on people walking near the building of Crimea's regional parliament in Simferopol, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Crimea's parliament on Monday declared the region an independent state, after its residents voted overwhelmingly to break off from Ukraine and seek to join Russia.
    Vadim Ghirda | AP
  • Belgium EU Ukraine Diplomacy
    British Foreign Secretary William Hague, left, talks with French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius, right, and Dutch Foreign Minister Frans Timmermans, during the EU foreign ministers council at the European Council building in Brussels, Monday, March 17, 2014. British Foreign Secretary Hague says he is confident that the European Union will ratchet up pressure on Russia over its role in the breakaway of Ukraine's Crimea region by imposing sanctions on people linked to the secession of the peninsula. The 28-nation EU condemned the Crimea referendum which overwhelmingly backed a return to Russia, and the EU foreign ministers were assessing on Monday who to target for asset freezes and travel bans.
    Yves Logghe | AP
  • Ukraine
    Vitali Klitschko, UDAR (Ukrainian Democratic Alliance for Reform) party leader and former heavy weight boxer, looks down as a journalists asks a question during a news conference at a hotel in Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's Crimean peninsula declared itself independent Monday after its residents voted overwhelmingly to secede and join Russia, while the United States and the European Union slapped sanctions against some of those who promoted the divisive referendum. In Kiev, Ukraine's new government dismissed Russia's proposal Monday as unacceptable, saying it "looks like an ultimatum."
    David Azia | AP
  • Turkey Ukraine
    Mustafa Kirimoglu, a prominent Crimean Tatar political leader and Ukrainian legislator listens during a news conference with Turkish Foreign Minister Ahmet Davutoglu in Ankara, Turkey, Monday March 17, 2014. Kirimoglu said the referendum in Crimea, boycotted by Crimean Tatars, was “illegitimate” and called for Russian troops to leave Ukrainian territory. Turkey has historic and cultural ties to Crimea and its Muslim Tatar population, which want to remain part of Ukraine.
    Burhan Ozbilici | AP
  • Russia Putin
    Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks during an awards ceremony in Sochi on Monday, March 17, 2014. Putin is set to speak to both houses of parliament Tuesday about the results of Sunday’s referendum in Crimea, in which its residents voted overwhelmingly to break off from Ukraine and join Russia.
    Mikhail Klimentyev | AP
  • Ukraine
    Self-Defense activists perform military exercises at a military training ground outside Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's parliament on Monday voted partial mobilization in response to Russia's invasion onto the Ukrainian territory.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP
  • Ukraine
    Self-Defense activists perform military exercises at a military training ground outside Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's parliament on Monday voted partial mobilization in response to Russia's invasion onto the Ukrainian territory.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP
  • Ukraine
    Self-Defense activists perform military exercises at a military training ground outside Kiev, Ukraine, Monday, March 17, 2014. Ukraine's parliament on Monday voted partial mobilization in response to Russia's invasion onto the Ukrainian territory.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in the central square in Sevastopol, Ukraine, early Monday, March 17, 2014. Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in the central square in Sevastopol, Ukraine, late Sunday, March 16, 2014. Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in Lenin Square, in Simferopol, Ukraine, Sunday, March 16, 2014. Fireworks exploded and Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Ivan Sekretarev | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in Lenin Square, in Simferopol, Ukraine, Sunday, March 16, 2014. Fireworks exploded and Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Ivan Sekretarev | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in the central square in Sevastopol, Ukraine, late Sunday, March 16, 2014. Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian people celebrate in the central square in Sevastopol, Ukraine, late Sunday, March 16, 2014. Russian flags fluttered above jubilant crowds Sunday after residents in Crimea voted overwhelmingly to secede from Ukraine and join Russia. The United States and Europe condemned the ballot as illegal and destabilizing and were expected to slap sanctions against Russia for it.
    Andrew Lubimov | AP
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