Sacramento Bee reporters Cynthia Hubert and Phillip Reese were honored Monday as Pulitzer Prize finalists in the investigative reporting category.

James Flavy Coy Brown, a homeless and mentally ill man allegedly “dumped” by Nevada’s primary psychiatric hospital via Greyhound bus into Sacramento last year, on Friday became the national face of a problem that experts said is widespread and should be curtailed by federal authorities.

A federal judge on Thursday dismissed a civil lawsuit brought on behalf of a patient who was bused to Sacramento from a Nevada state psychiatric hospital in Las Vegas.

The announcement followed a Sacramento Bee investigative report published Sunday that found numerous patients discharged from Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas to Greyhound buses bound for other states were later arrested at the destination cities for crimes that included murder, assault, theft, vagrancy and sex offenses.

Marc Berrier wound up in Seattle following a “long, strange series of events,” he said.

Rawson-Neal’s busing policies came to light early this year, when The Sacramento Bee published the story of a man the psychiatric hospital shipped to Sacramento even though he had no ties to the capital city.

Six months after he was discharged to a Greyhound bus and shipped out of Las Vegas, one former patient of Nevada’s primary hospital for mentally ill people stabbed a man to death in Iowa.

Spurred by concerns that a Nevada hospital bused hundreds of mental patients across the country, in some cases to cities where they had no support system or treatment arrangements, Rep. Doris Matsui has introduced federal legislation that would impose hefty fines on facilities that engage in so-called “Greyhound therapy.”

San Francisco City Attorney Dennis Herrera filed a class action suit Tuesday against the state of Nevada, alleging the state improperly bused indigent psychiatric patients to the Bay Area.

Some of them heard voices and saw imaginary people. Some talked of killing themselves by jumping off a building or walking in front of a bus. They suffered from afflictions ranging from cocaine addiction to schizoaffective disorder, and most were homeless and without medical insurance.

The San Francisco city attorney on Tuesday accused Nevada health officials of improperly busing two dozen mental patients from Las Vegas to San Francisco in recent years, and threatened to file a class-action lawsuit if Nevada doesn't repay the cost of caring for them and hundreds of other patients shipped via Greyhound to California during that time.

A federal agency is moving to terminate Medicare funding for Nevada's embattled state psychiatric hospital, which has been under fire for busing hundreds of patients to states across the nation in the past five years.

A Nevada state legislative committee on Tuesday unanimously approved $2.1 million in emergency spending to shore up the state's mental health system.

A Nevada state psychiatric hospital under fire for busing hundreds of mentally ill patients to cities across the nation over the past five years will not appeal a decision stripping it of its accreditation.

A Nevada state hospital that discharged and bused hundreds of mentally ill patients across California and the nation during the last five years is poised to lose its accreditation.

The nonprofit organization that accredits health organizations nationwide has issued a preliminary denial of accreditation for a Las Vegas hospital that has discharged and bused hundreds of mentally-ill patients across the county.

Following a series of Bee reports, Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas revised its policy and no longer discharges people to buses without an escort. But questions still loom about the fate of the hundreds of mentally ill patients sent off alone over the past five years.

The state of Nevada and its primary psychiatric hospital violated the constitutional rights of mentally ill people by discharging them via Greyhound bus to cities across the nation without proper consent or making arrangements for their care, a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Las Vegas charges.

The American Civil Liberties Union and a Sacramento attorney plan to file a lawsuit later today alleging that Nevada's largest psychiatric hospital violated the civil rights of patients by busing them outside of the state with no plan for care.

Nevada's primary state hospital for psychiatric patients will retain its accreditation, at least temporarily, following reports that it discharged and bused hundreds of patients to California and across the country over the past five years.

Nevada's largest psychiatric facility should hire more staff and shore up discharge protocols to guard against practices that resulted in some patients being bused alone out of state, with no shelter or family waiting at their destination, two consultants hired by the state concluded in a report Thursday.

Multiple agencies, including the Los Angeles city attorney's office, are investigating whether Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas, Nevada's primary public mental health facility, has been systematically dumping patients across state lines for years.

A Nevada psychiatric hospital under scrutiny for busing hundreds of patients out of state in recent years suffers from "systemic" problems that compromise the safety of the patients who are being discharged, a federal investigation has determined.

Federal investigators said today that a Nevada state psychiatric hospital under scrutiny for busing roughly 1,500 patients to other states in recent years "failed to provide a safe discharge plan for patients."

In the darkness of early mornings during his graveyard shift at Nevada's primary state psychiatric hospital, Gilbert Degala regularly walked patients outside and watched them climb into taxis bound for the Greyhound bus station on Main Street.

An independent accreditation agency dispatched a team of investigators to Nevada's primary hospital for the mentally ill on Thursday as concerns mounted that the facility has been "dumping" patients into other states.

Twenty-one California lawmakers sent a letter Tuesday to the secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. attorney general calling for an investigation into Nevada's long-standing practice of busing mentally ill patients to other states.

Twenty-one California lawmakers today sent a letter to the Secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the U.S. Attorney General calling for an investigation into Nevada's long-standing practice of busing mentally ill patients to other states.

Nevada Gov. Brian Sandoval said today that an unspecified number of employees at Rawson-Neal Psychiatric Hospital in Las Vegas have been fired as a result of an investigation into the hospital's practice of busing patients to other states.

The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services on Thursday sent a letter to Nevada health officials telling them that, due to "serious deficiencies," the state's primary psychiatric hospital "may be subject to termination of its Medicare provider agreement," according to a copy of the letter obtained by The Bee.

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