The legal fight between the University of Central Florida and the family of a football player who collapsed and died following conditioning drills is headed for Florida's highest court.

The federal panel that sets sentencing policy eased penalties this year for potentially tens of thousands of nonviolent drug offenders. Now, defense lawyers and prisoner advocates are pushing for similar treatment for a different category of defendants: swindlers, embezzlers, insider traders and other white-collar criminals.

U.S. businesses added to their stockpiles at a slightly slower pace in June compared with May, possibly reflecting weaker sales in the past two months.

Senate Democrats unleashed on Wednesday the first piece of a $9.1 million North Carolina advertising blitz that criticizes GOP hopeful Thom Tillis for making deep cuts to education spending and providing tax breaks for his wealthy friends. Republicans immediately called the claims "outright lies."

U.S. retail sales were essentially flat in July, providing evidence that consumers have yet to shed their doubts about the economy despite recent job gains.

The Republican-led Michigan Senate on Wednesday voted to keep intact the state's power to allow wolf hunts, approving a bill designed to keep voters from stopping future hunts in referendums in November.

Little of the impassioned debate that fractured lawmakers last year over possible military intervention in Syria is happening now as American warplanes strike extremist targets in Iraq.

More than 2,000 immigrants facing deportation in 2013 were released strictly for budget reasons by immigration agency officials who kept the homeland security secretary in the dark about the plan, according to a federal watchdog's report.

Faced with tougher and more resistant weeds, corn and soybean farmers are anxiously awaiting government decisions on a new version of a popular herbicide — and on genetically modified seeds to grow crops designed to resist it.

The Obama administration is easing a key part of its rule restricting lobbyists from serving in government.

The Obama administration wrongly denied for weeks in 2013 that it had released more than 2,000 immigrants from jails because lower-ranking government officials failed to notify the Homeland Security secretary they were letting them go due to budget concerns, according to an oversight report released Tuesday.

Ajit Pai called the NFL's television blackout rules "outdated," and urged his fellow Federal Communications Commission representatives to vote in favor of having them repealed to address fan concerns.

Military installations have a new system for checking the credentials of people trying to gain access.

The annual best-of-summer meteor shower peaks late Tuesday and into the wee hours Wednesday morning.

The Education Department said Tuesday that it was awarding $28.4 million in grants to 40 states, Washington, D.C., and the Virgin Islands to reduce the cost of advanced placement exams for low-income students.

Federal health regulators have approved a novel device that can preserve donated lungs outside the body for possible transplantation into critically ill patients.

Former Tennessee director of sports medicine Jenny Moshak and two ex-Lady Vols strength coaches are receiving support from a women's legal advocacy group in their lawsuit against the university.

The federal government ran a lower deficit this July than a year ago, keeping it on course to record the lowest deficit in six years.

The Education Department is announcing $28.4 million in grants to 40 states, Washington, D.C., and the Virgin Islands to reduce the cost of advanced placement exams for low-income students.

Journalist and scientific organizations accused the Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday of attempting to muzzle its independent scientific advisers by directing them to funnel all outside requests for information through agency officials.

Another 130 U.S. troops arrived in Iraq on Tuesday on what the Pentagon described as a temporary mission to assess the scope of the humanitarian crisis facing thousands of displaced Iraqi civilians trapped on Sinjar Mountain and evaluate options for getting them out to safety.

Prosecutors in the District of Columbia have for now stopped charging people with carrying a handgun outside their home or business after a judge ruled a city law banning carrying a handgun unconstitutional.

Hundreds of thousands of people who signed up under the new health care law risk losing their taxpayer-subsidized insurance unless they act quickly to resolve questions about their citizenship or immigration status. The government warned on Tuesday that they have just over three weeks to show that they're eligible.

U.S. employers in June advertised the most monthly job openings in more than 13 years.

U.S. military officials say an armed American drone has attacked and destroyed a mortar position of Islamic militants in northern Iraq.

IOC member Princess Haya of Jordan cited her relief work for Gaza as a reason not to seek re-election as International Equestrian Federation president.

A day after his election, new Italian football federation president Carlo Tavecchio sounded out former Juventus manager Antonio Conte in the search for a new coach for the national team.

An experimental Ebola drug has been used to treat two American aid workers and a Spanish missionary priest. Could Liberian doctors be next?

A reignited culture clash between snowboarders and skiers didn't get an immediate resolution Monday after boarders suing one of the last ski resorts in the country to prohibit their hobby argued in a Utah courtroom that the ban is discriminatory and based on outdated stereotypes.

Penn State's trustees will meet by phone this week to discuss the status of state officials' lawsuit against the NCAA over the use of a $60 million fine the university has been paying because of the Jerry Sandusky child molestation scandal.

The Food and Drug Administration on Monday approved the first screening test for colon cancer that uses patients' DNA to help spot potentially deadly tumors and growths.

Attorney General Eric Holder says the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager in a St. Louis suburb deserves a full review.

An experimental Ebola drug has been used to treat two American aid workers and a Spanish missionary priest. Could Liberian doctors be next?

President Barack Obama welcomed new leadership in Iraq as "a promising step forward" Monday amid a political and security crisis in Baghdad, saying the only lasting solution is the formation of an inclusive government.

The Drug Enforcement Administration paid an Amtrak employee hundreds of thousands of dollars over two decades to obtain confidential information it could have gotten for free, according to internal investigators at the railroad.

In a story Aug. 11 about U.S. Postal Service Revenues, The Associated Press reported erroneously that the agency blamed its $2 billion loss for the quarter ending June 30 on increases in compensation and benefit costs. Although those costs did increase slightly, the overall loss reflected the agency spending $18.4 billion in operating costs against revenues of $16.5 billion.

The organization that runs youth and amateur football in the United States is teaming up with the American military to make the game safer overseas.

Federal regulators are warning consumers about the risks of using virtual currencies such as Bitcoin.

Vice President Joe Biden is giving U.S. support to Iraq's new president and his nominee to take over as prime minister over the objections of the incumbent.

The U.S. is delivering food, water and aid teams to try to help tens of thousands of people who have been forced from their homes in Iraq in the fresh wave of violence in the country's north.

As an AIDS activist in the early 1990s, Gregg Gonsalves traveled to Washington to challenge the Food and Drug Administration.

Despite allegations of racism marring his electoral campaign, Carlo Tavecchio was elected the new president of the Italian football federation on Monday.

U.S. fighter jets have carried out airstrikes on four checkpoints manned by Sunni militants in northwest Iraq near where thousands of minority Yazidi refugees have been trapped on a mountain to escape violence.

A crane is in place and construction is about to begin for the minor league baseball park in Biloxi.

Mark Emmert said Sunday that the NCAA will appeal a ruling that opens the door for college athletes to receive some of the money they help generate in major sports.

The Defense Department says a new round of airstrikes by U.S. fighter jets and unmanned drones has targeted Islamic militants in Iraq.

Mark Emmert said Sunday that college sports' largest governing body will appeal Friday's federal court decision that gives athletes a right to some of the millions of dollars they help generate.

Mark Emmert said Sunday that the NCAA will appeal a ruling that opens the door for college athletes to receive some of the money they help generate in major sports.

President Barack Obama has helped kick off the international Gay Games in Cleveland with a surprise video message shown at the opening ceremonies.

The United States said Sunday it "fully supports" Iraq's new president, just hours after embattled Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki accused him of violating the constitution.

The U.S. military has dropped food and water for a third time to thousands of Iraqi refugees stranded on Mount Sinjar.

Ed O'Bannon knows it's not over, far from it. He's ready for the appeals, and welcomes a challenge to the ruling that could change big-time college sports forever.

The U.S. military says American jet fighters and drones have conducted four more airstrikes on Islamic militants in Iraq, taking out armored carriers and a truck that were firing on civilians.

President Barack Obama on Saturday fled Washington for his familiar spot on Martha's Vineyard for a two-week summer vacation, which comes as the U.S. is engaged in airstrikes against Islamic militant targets in Iraq.

President Barack Obama on Saturday refused to give a time limit on America's renewed military involvement in Iraq, saying he doesn't think "we are going to solve this problem in weeks" as the country struggles to form a new government.

Caterpillar has evacuated a handful of employees from Liberia. Canadian Overseas Petroleum Ltd. has suspended a drilling project. British Airways has canceled flights to the region. ExxonMobil and Chevron are waiting to see whether health officials can contain the danger.

President Barack Obama says the United States can't and shouldn't intervene in every world crisis. But he says when innocent people face a massacre and the U.S. has the ability to stop it, the nation shouldn't look away.

For years, Kurdish officials have beseeched the Obama administration to let them buy U.S. weapons. And for just as long, the administration has rebuffed the Kurds, America's closest allies in Iraq.

On a soggy day at Valhalla, Rory McIlroy put himself in a familiar position — at the top of the leaderboard in the PGA Championship. For Tiger Woods, another major disappointment. He's heading home for the weekend.

Trying to bring a case against John Hinckley Jr. in the homicide of former White House press secretary James Brady could prove difficult for prosecutors, given the three decades that have passed since he was shot in an assassination try on Ronald Reagan and because a jury ruled that Hinckley was insane when he opened fire, an attorney and law professor said.

An appellate court caught in an extraordinary legal snafu refused Friday to consider Donald Sterling's request to block the $2 billion sale of the team to former Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer but said he could file it again.

A federal judge has ruled that some college athletes can receive payments when they leave school for the rights to their names, images and likenesses, opening the door for them to get a fraction of the billions of dollars generated by collegiate athletics. The decision comes after a lawsuit launched by former UCLA basketball star Ed O'Bannon, who was upset because his image was used in a video game, but he wasn't paid.

U.S. District Judge Claudia Wilken ruled Friday that the NCAA can't stop college football and basketball players from profiting off the rights to their names and likenesses.

Gov. Chris Christie has vetoed legislation that would have paved the way for sports wagering at New Jersey's casinos and racetracks.

For much of the summer, President Barack Obama had watched with alarm as a brutal, al-Qaida-linked insurgency seized more and more territory in northern Iraq. But it wasn't until Thursday, when Obama learned that genocide could be imminent, that the president decided the U.S. military had to act.

College football and basketball players could be in line for paydays worth thousands of dollars once they leave school after a landmark ruling Friday that may change the way the NCAA does business.

This week's death of former White House press secretary James Brady, who survived a gunshot wound to the head in a 1981 assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan, has been ruled a homicide, District of Columbia police said Friday.

An attempt by Argentina to sue the U.S. in the world court appears unlikely to get off the ground.

The U.S. launched two more airstrikes against Islamic State targets in northern Iraq on Friday, hitting a vehicle convoy and two mortar positions, the Pentagon said.

President Barack Obama's comments on the United States' role in Iraq have evolved over the years, up to his decision Thursday to renew military action. Here are some of those comments:

Organizers of the Pittsburgh Triathlon didn't appear to follow their own rules when they allowed the event to include swimming after rains carried raw sewage into a city river before Sunday's event, a newspaper reported.

The Obama administration ordered U.S. airlines not to fly over Iraq following the first U.S. airstrikes there Friday, while carriers from other nations said they were suspending service to the Iraqi city of Irbil because of the hostilities.

The White House is condemning the renewed rocket fire in the conflict between Israel and militants in the Gaza Strip and urging both sides to cease hostilities immediately.

The Department of Veterans Affairs has apologized for what it called an "inadvertent" mistake that underreported the number of deaths linked to delays in cancer treatment at VA medical facilities.

A federal judge has set aside a ruling by an activist magistrate who has been rejecting some government requests for search warrants to conduct electronic surveillance.

The Federal Aviation Administration said it is prohibiting U.S. airlines and other commercial carriers from flying over Iraq as the U.S. launched its first airstrikes there Friday.

U.S. wholesalers restocked their warehouses at a modest pace in June for a second straight month, a sign they may anticipate slower growth ahead.

U.S. workers were more productive in the April-June quarter and labor costs rose slightly, a sharp turnaround from grim first-quarter figures.

President Barack Obama is doing something unusual with his summer vacation on Martha's Vineyard: He'll come back to Washington midway through the getaway to attend White House meetings.

President Barack Obama's new military strategy in Iraq amounts to trying to contain — not destroy — the Islamic militant group that now controls much of the country's northern region. That leaves open the questions of how deeply the U.S. will be drawn into the sectarian conflict, and whether airstrikes alone can stop the militants' momentum.

College football's biggest schools are ready to spend millions of dollars more on their athletes.

It's usually someone jumping over the White House fence that causes Secret Service agents patrolling the grounds to scramble.

Defense official: US airdrops food, water to Iraqi citizens threatened by Islamic militants.

The State Department is ordering all eligible family members of U.S. personnel to leave the American Embassy in Liberia's capital city because of the Ebola outbreak.

All sorts of weather factors came together for Hawaii's twin hurricane threat: stuck currents, an oddball brewing El Nino, slightly warmer water but mostly just bad luck.

North Dakotans, enriched by an oil boom, stepped up their spending at triple the national pace in the three years that followed the Great Recession. In Nevada, smacked hard by the housing bust, consumers barely increased their spending.

U.S. consumers expanded their borrowing at a slower rate in June compared to the prior month.

U.S. health authorities have eased safety restrictions on an experimental drug to treat Ebola, a move that could clear the way for its use in patients infected with the deadly virus.

Hyundai has agreed to pay a $17.35 million fine for delayed reporting of a brake defect affecting Genesis luxury cars, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said Thursday.

Montana U.S. Sen. John Walsh dropped his election campaign Thursday amid allegations he plagiarized large portions of a 2007 research project, leaving fellow Democrats to scramble for a replacement with the election less than three months away.

Russian diners won't be able to find creamy Dutch cheeses or juicy Polish apples in the grocery store or cook up chicken from the United States — the result of a Russian ban on most food imports from the West.

The U.S. Department of Education has concluded that two Virginia schools denied students with emotional disabilities the right to a free, appropriate public education by frequently subjecting them to seclusion and physical restraint.

Highlights of the NCAA's new Division I governance structure, which was passed by the board of directors Thursday and will take effect if it survives a 60-day override period:

A quarter of U.S. households say they're "just getting by" financially, a survey by the Federal Reserve shows.

The current Ebola crisis in West Africa is on pace to sicken more people than all other previous outbreaks of the disease combined, the health official leading the U.S. response said Thursday.

The State Department is urging China to allow a dissident lawyer who was freed from prison Thursday to come to the United States to be reunited with his family if he so chooses.

It's time for the Cleveland Indians to drop their name and Chief Wahoo mascot, an Ohio state senator says.

In what may be the birth of cheap, easy-to-make robots, researchers have created complex machines that transform themselves from little more than a sheet of paper and plastic into walking automatons.

An Illinois appeals court says the Chicago Bears owe $4.1 million to Cook County in amusement taxes, plus interest.

The biggest schools in college sports are about to get a chance to make their own rules.

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