Unregulated genetically modified wheat has popped up in a second location in the United States, this time in Montana, the Agriculture Department said Friday.

The nation's top military officer says the United States and its allies are taking every precaution to limit civilian casualties as they continue air strikes against Islamic State group militants in Syria and Iraq.

The chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff says the ground troops he may eventually recommend in Iraq would not necessarily be American.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi will join President Barack Obama for dinner on Monday and attend a State Department lunch the next day. But there's one hitch.

A federal judge in Minneapolis who had been the arbiter of NFL labor matters for more than two decades recused himself Friday from ruling on a dispute between NFL owners and the players' union over an alleged secret salary cap.

President Barack Obama says that in an interconnected world, outbreaks of deadly viruses like Ebola have the potential to affect every nation.

Aiming to restrict lenders who prey on members of the military, the Obama administration on Friday moved to close legal loopholes that have placed hundreds of thousands of service members at risk of excessive payday and other short-term loan fees.

"The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" on Thursday night aired a controversial segment pitting Washington Redskins fans against a group of American Indians who want the team to change its mascot.

The U.S. economy's bounce-back last quarter from a dismal winter was even faster than previously thought, a sign that growth will likely remain solid for rest of the year.

Eric Holder, who is resigning as attorney general, leaves a legacy built over six years during which he was in the vanguard of administration policymaking but also the subject of intense criticism from Republicans. A look the legacy of the nation's first black attorney general and one of President Barack Obama's longest-serving Cabinet members:

The U.S. believes there are about a dozen Americans fighting alongside extremist groups in Syria, not more than 100, as has been cited for months.

For nearly three months this summer, the Obama administration carefully avoided answering questions about what happened to tens of thousands of immigrant families caught illegally crossing the Mexican border and released into the United States with instructions to report back to immigration authorities.

It wasn't difficult for Barack Obama and Eric Holder to be in the same orbit. Both were sons of immigrants, Columbia Ivy Leaguers, basketball fans and prominent African-American political figures.

The video of Ray Rice punching his fiancee inside a casino elevator was sent to NFL headquarters to the attention of league security chief Jeffrey Miller in April, a law enforcement official says.

FIFA President Sepp Blatter will announce on Friday his candidacy for re-election in a 2015 campaign he is overwhelmingly favored to win.

U.S. Bank is refunding about $48 million in the latest federal settlement by a major bank over improper billing for extra credit card products that customers didn't receive.

President Barack Obama is accepting the resignation of Attorney General Eric Holder and praising him for his deep commitment to ensuring all Americans receive equal justice under the law.

Senior U.S. officials offered a more nuanced picture Thursday of the threat they believe is posed by an al-Qaida cell in Syria targeted in military strikes this week, even as they defended the decision to attack the militants.

Eric Holder, who is resigning as attorney general, leaves a legacy built over six years during which he was in the vanguard of administration policymaking but also the subject of intense criticism from Republicans. A look the legacy of the nation's first black attorney general and one of President Barack Obama's longest-serving Cabinet members:

Plots against the U.S. and Europe by the al-Qaida cell in Syria known as the Khorasan Group may still be in the works.

The FBI director on Thursday criticized the decision by Apple and Google to encrypt smartphones data so it can be inaccessible to law enforcement, even with a court order.

The number of Americans the government believes is fighting alongside extremist groups in Syria is almost one-tenth the number cited by government officials and lawmakers for months.

The FBI director says the U.S. believes it has identified the British-accented masked man in the videos depicting the beheadings of two American journalists and a British aid worker.

A judge has stayed a lawsuit filed by track coach Jon Drummond against former sprint champion Tyson Gay and the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency, saying it must be settled for now in arbitration, not in federal court.

Recent court decisions that require the government to restore cost-of-living increases for federal judges will cost taxpayers more than $1 billion over the coming decade, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

Tens of thousands of young families caught crossing the border illegally earlier this year subsequently failed to meet with federal immigration agents, as they were instructed, the Homeland Security Department has acknowledged privately.

The parents of Michael Brown and Eric Garner, two black men who died in encounters with white police officers, joined with civil rights leaders on Thursday to call for a full federal investigation and charges against those involved in their deaths.

Every day for a year after his most painful professional setback, the chief of Chicago's bid for the 2016 Olympics got hit with some form of the same question, always from a different person: Why?

The U.S. military is looking into allegations that civilians may have been killed in U.S. and allied airstrikes in Syria, but so far there is no "credible" reporting that such deaths occurred, the Pentagon said Thursday.

Top lawmakers in Congress have approved the use of leftover Afghanistan war money to fight Ebola in West Africa.

Eric Holder, America's first black attorney general and an unflinching champion of civil rights in enforcing the nation's laws, announced his resignation Thursday after leading the Justice Department since the first days of President Barack Obama's term. He is the fourth-longest-serving attorney general in U.S. history.

Average long-term U.S. mortgage rates declined slightly this week, after marking their largest one-week gain of the year the previous week.

The National Park Service is starting the second phase of a restoration project to allow grass to grow on the National Mall.

Orders for long-lasting manufactured goods slumped in August as demand for commercial aircraft descended from record highs, but investment plans by businesses posted promising gains.

The number of people seeking U.S. unemployment benefits increased last week after falling sharply two weeks ago. Despite the rise, the level of applications remains near pre-recession levels, a sign that hiring will likely remain healthy.

The U.S. ambassador to the United Nations says America doesn't have to be perpetually at war, but it must take on the surging Islamic State group.

Moving from reluctance to refusal and finally to acceptance, Turkey is joining its NATO allies and fellow Sunni Muslim nations in a coalition to destroy the Islamic State militant group. But the world is still waiting for details of any new, specific aid and is warily watching to make sure Ankara keeps its commitments.

Smart people in the Obama administration have spent the last two days telling the American people that U.S. strikes against the Khorasan Group were necessary to disrupt "imminent attack plotting" against U.S. and Western interests.

A federal judge has left a small legal opening for some Indonesian villagers to pursue a lawsuit against Exxon Mobil Corp. for human rights abuses allegedly committed by Indonesian troops guarding an Exxon natural gas field.

An Oklahoma woman says in a lawsuit that Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones paid her for at least four years to prevent her from reporting an alleged sexual assault.

After more than a decade of planning and millions spent to build a memorial near the National Mall honoring the late President Dwight D. Eisenhower, a key lawmaker who has helped oversee the project from the start is stepping away.

Envisioned in the 1990s as crucial to U.S. military superiority in the next century, the sleek, radar-evading F-22 Raptor has finally seen its first combat.

The U.S. and two Arab allies took aim Wednesday at a key source of financing for Islamic State militants, bombing 12 of the oil refineries controlled by the terrorist group in Syria, the military said.

The number of uninsured patients admitted to hospitals has dropped markedly this year, reducing charity care and bad debt cases, particularly in states that have expanded Medicaid coverage under the new federal health care law, a government report released Wednesday concluded.

The Obama administration is tightening oversight of high-stakes scientific research involving dangerous germs that could raise biosecurity concerns, imposing new safety rules on universities and other institutions where such work is done.

More than 160 District of Columbia police officers will wear cameras that record them performing their duties as part of a six-month pilot program.

The Treasury Department on Wednesday imposed sanctions on eight people it says have helped finance or facilitate the movement of foreign fighters joining the Islamic State and the Nusra Front, two Syrian extremist groups that have been the subject of recent American military strikes.

Smart people in the administration have spent the last two days telling the American people that U.S. strikes against the Khorasan Group were necessary to disrupt "imminent attack plotting" against U.S. and Western interests.

One of the big frustrations of surgery: There's little way to know if you'll be a fast or slow healer, someone who feels back to normal in a week or is out of work for a month with lingering pain and fatigue.

The failure of Nico Rosberg's Mercedes at the Singapore Grand Prix has given the championship advantage to teammate and race winner Lewis Hamilton — and it raised questions about whether Formula One's proposed new radio bans are a good idea.

For weeks, amid allegations involving several NFL players, domestic violence has been the focus of intense national attention. Does the turmoil reflect a worsening epidemic of domestic violence, or has the U.S. in fact made great strides to curtail it? The answer is complicated.

The top Republican on the Senate Armed Services Committee is holding up money to fight Ebola until the Obama administration provides details on how the military would protect American personnel sent to Africa to battle the epidemic.

The U.S. Treasury Department continued to approve "excessive" pay raises for top executives at General Motors and its former consumer finance arm, both of which received taxpayer-funded bailouts during the financial crisis, a new government report says.

Bills in the Michigan Legislature would prohibit the use of a drone to hunt animals.

The number of shootings in which a gunman wounds or kills multiple people has increased dramatically in recent years, with the majority of attacks in the last decade occurring at a business or a school, according to an FBI report released Wednesday.

The Education Department on Wednesday reported a drop in the percentage of people who are defaulting on repaying student loans in the first years after they are due.

New government-approved labeling on Pfizer's drug Chantix suggests that the anti-smoking medication may not carry the risks of suicidal behavior that first earned it the Food and Drug Administration's strongest warning more than five years ago.

Three years ago, Jason Prosser was stunned to discover the cost of child care for his newborn son — so much so that he and his wife postponed having a second child.

The Veterans Affairs Department and other government agencies are not doing enough to help women who served in the military, even as their number is rising dramatically, according to a new report.

A federal judge has arranged for two jurors to get legal help to ensure they are paid by their employers during a lengthy criminal trial of Blackwater security guards.

The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee says an al Qaida-linked group was close to being capable of assembling an explosive device that could go undetected through airport security.

The Tennessee Supreme Court says it won't hear an appeal from a woman convicted of murder in the stabbing death of a Middle Tennessee State University basketball player.

U.S. sales of new homes surged in August, led by a wave of buying in the West and Northeast.

A Pentagon spokesman says the United States executed two airstrikes Wednesday on an Islamic State group staging area in eastern Syria.

National security adviser Susan Rice is asserting there's no plan to commit American ground combat forces to the fight against the Islamic State group.

Latest update from U.S. Central Command on the military action by the U.S. and its allies against Islamic State group militants in Syria and Iraq. The Syria action began Sept. 21; the Iraq action Aug. 8.

Oh, deer! Unwary motorists aren't the only ones who need to beware of the four-legged bane of gardeners, especially at this time of the year. Pilots are also having deer encounters that rarely end well, especially for the deer.

Chicago Bulls point guard Derrick Rose announced Tuesday he is donating $1 million to city's After School Matters program for city's economically disadvantaged teenagers.

BlackBerry launched a new smartphone Wednesday as the embattled Canadian company hopes for a comeback.

Thirty-five House Democrats are urging the Obama administration to prohibit children from working on tobacco farms, citing concerns about ill health effects.

There is no indication of advanced al-Qaida or Islamic State group terror plotting inside the United States, but airstrikes in Syria may have temporarily disrupted attack planning against U.S. or Western targets, according to a security bulletin Tuesday from the FBI and the Homeland Security Department.

Convicted national security leaker Chelsea Manning asked a federal court Tuesday to order the Defense Department to provide hormone therapy and other treatment for her gender identity condition while she serves her 35-year sentence in military confinement.

An investigation into alleged World Cup bid corruption should be published in full, according to FIFA vice president Prince Ali bin Al-Hussein of Jordan.

The one-two-three punch of American and Arab airstrikes against Islamic State militants in Syria and Iraq was just the beginning, President Barack Obama and other leaders declared Tuesday. They promised a sustained campaign showcasing a rare U.S.-Arab partnership aimed at Muslim extremists.

The U.S. and five Arab countries launched airstrikes Monday night on Islamic State group targets and an al-Qaida group in Syria. Some facts about the military action:

The Obama administration says consumers in most states will have more insurance options next year under the president's health care law.

Joshua Bell wants a do-over in Washington.

The U.S. decision to strike the Khorasan Group to stop a possible terror attack represents a significant expansion of the largely secret war against core al-Qaida, a group President Barack Obama has proclaimed was "a shadow of its former self."

A U.S. official says America and its Arab allies launched more than 200 airstrikes against roughly a dozen militant targets in Syria during the assault that began Monday night.

A reluctant District of Columbia Council voted unanimously Tuesday to allow people to carry concealed handguns in the nation's capital for the first time in nearly 40 years.

WASHINGTON (AP) — In a story Sept. 23 about American Indian nicknames at District of Columbia public schools, The Associated Press, relying on information from the D.C. Council and public school officials, reported erroneously that five schools would be forced to change their nicknames if the council approved a bill banning racially based nicknames and mascots. Two schools would be forced to change their names, not five.

The Pentagon says airstrikes in Syria and Iraq are the beginning of a "credible and sustainable, persistent" campaign to degrade and ultimately destroy the Islamic State militant group.

President Barack Obama says the participation of five Arab nations in airstrikes against militants in Syria "makes it clear to the world this is not America's fight alone."

Republican candidate for governor of Massachusetts Charlie Baker is calling on National Football League Commissioner Roger Goodell to step down.

U.S. health regulators are trying to help doctors spot counterfeit and unapproved drugs by raising awareness of illegal operations that peddle bogus drugs to health professionals.

When the first world record fell at the Asian Games — to a North Korean weightlifter — elated South Korean fans pounded drums and stood to cheer.

Three months after announcing its intention to largely comply with an international treaty banning land mines, the Obama administration on Tuesday carved out an exception for its stockpile of the weapons on the Korean Peninsula.

Eight college fraternities announced Tuesday an effort to work together on new training aimed at combating sexual misconduct, hazing and binge drinking.

Obama administration officials returned Tuesday to citing Congress' 2001 authorization to wage war on the terrorists responsible for the 9/11 attacks as legal grounding for its overnight airstrikes against Islamic State militants and an al-Qaida affiliate inside Syria.

Former President Bill Clinton and British Prime Minister Tony Blair say the West must proceed methodically but firmly against the Islamic State group trying to deepen its footprint in the Mideast.

The D.C. Council is expected to decide Tuesday whether to allow residents to carry concealed handguns in the district, with some restrictions.

The federal prison population has dropped in the last year by roughly 4,800, the first time in several decades that the inmate count has gone down, according to the Justice Department.

In a forceful appeal for international cooperation on limiting carbon pollution, President Barack Obama warned starkly on Tuesday that the globe's climate is changing faster than efforts to address it. "Nobody gets a pass," he declared. "We have to raise our collective ambition."

The Obama administration's decision to curb the ability of U.S. corporations to skirt taxes by merging with foreign companies kicked off an immediate election-season debate over when and how to tackle the nation's complex corporate tax code.

Secret Service agents in Virginia and Washington earlier this summer twice interviewed an Army veteran accused of climbing over a White House fence during the weekend and running into the executive mansion in the two months before the embarrassing security breach, a federal law enforcement said Tuesday.

The government's own watchdogs tried to hack into HealthCare.gov earlier this year and found what they termed a critical vulnerability — but also came away with respect for some of the health insurance site's security features.

Months before becoming president-elect of Afghanistan, Ashraf Ghani Ahmadzai began spending tens of thousands of dollars on lobbyists in the United States, using his ties to the West to seek influence in Washington.

The U.S. and five Arab countries launched airstrikes Monday night on Islamic State group targets in Syria, expanding a military campaign into a country whose three-year civil war has given the brutal militant group a safe haven.

Vice President Joe Biden told frustrated Hispanic leaders Monday President Barack Obama is "absolutely committed to moving forward" on comprehensive immigration reforms "and he's going to do an awful lot."

The Obama administration cracked down Monday on certain overseas corporate mergers and acquisitions, aiming to curb American companies from shifting their ownership abroad to shirk paying U.S. taxes.

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