North Korea is not accepting American offers to send a high-level envoy to seek the release of three detained Americans, a senior U.S. official said Wednesday.

In the heat of an election campaign, Congress cleared the way for the U.S. military to train and equip Syrian rebels for a war against Islamic State militants Thursday night, reluctant ratification of a new strategy that President Barack Obama outlined scarcely a week ago.

In a show of solidarity with Ukraine, President Barack Obama welcomed the new leader of the embattled former Soviet republic to the White House Thursday, but he stopped short of fulfilling his visitor's urgent request for lethal aid to fight Russian-backed separatists.

Barry Bonds may yet overturn his obstruction of justice conviction.

The Agriculture Department has approved the use of genetically modified corn and soybean seeds that are resistant to a popular weed killer.

The future of the golf course under construction for the Rio de Janeiro Olympics in 2016 was unclear Wednesday after the city of Rio and the course developer — both defendants in a lawsuit — failed to agree to changes proposed by a Brazilian court.

President Barack Obama praised a House vote Wednesday granting him authority for the U.S. military to train and arm moderate Syrian rebels, calling it an important step toward confronting the Islamic State group.

Amazon.com founder Jeff Bezos plans to build a rocket engine that would eventually replace the Russian mainstay used in many American unmanned launches.

The White House and the Pentagon are grappling with how to explain what American military forces are doing and could do in Iraq as they battle the Islamic State militants.

Government agencies and conservation groups have completed restoration work on a 9,000-acre wetland area in central Michigan, providing an improved habitat for ducks and other waterfowl, officials said Wednesday.

Who was the mystery passenger President Barack Obama greeted Wednesday aboard a government aircraft at Andrews Air Force Base after he returned from Florida?

Federal health experts said Wednesday there is little evidence that testosterone-boosting drugs are effective for treating common signs of aging in men and that their use should be narrowed to exclude millions of Americans currently taking them.

District of Columbia officials say residents will be able to get licenses to carry concealed handguns outside the home, but only after they show a reason they need such a permit and complete extensive gun-safety training.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen says "it could take until the end of the decade" to shrink the Fed's record investment portfolio to more normal levels.

The Justice Department expects to bring criminal charges in the coming months in investigations involving financial institutions, Attorney General Eric Holder said Wednesday as he called for better incentives for Wall Street whistleblowers who report crime.

It's incredibly unlikely that Ebola would mutate to spread through the air, and the best way to make sure it doesn't is to stop the epidemic, a top government scientist told concerned lawmakers Wednesday.

A doctor who first exposed serious problems at the troubled Phoenix Veterans Affairs hospital said Wednesday that a report on patient deaths there is a "whitewash" that minimizes life-threatening conduct by senior leaders at the hospital.

The International Monetary Fund said Wednesday it is preparing $127 million in zero-interest loans to the three African countries hardest hit by the Ebola outbreak — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

Federal Reserve policymakers have slightly increased their estimate of what the Fed's benchmark interest rate should be at the end of 2015 compared with their estimate three months ago.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi says that for now the NFL's investigation into its handling of the domestic violence case involving running back Ray Rice is an appropriate response.

Record-low interest rates will be around for at least a few more months, the Federal Reserve made clear Wednesday.

Nearly 11 years after Barry Bonds testified before a grand jury investigating the illegal distribution of performance-enhancing drugs, a group of judges will hear arguments Thursday on whether baseball's career home-run leader should have his obstruction of justice conviction thrown out.

One year ago, President Barack Obama and Iranian President Hassan Rouhani came close to ending the decades-long freeze on face-to-face meetings between their countries' leaders.

Vice President Joe Biden said Wednesday he used a poor choice of words when he referred to unscrupulous moneylenders as "Shylocks," and a prominent group that fights anti-Semitism called it a teachable moment about the harmful effects of stereotypes.

Midwest retailer Meijer (MY-er) Inc. will pay $2 million to settle charges that the firm knowingly sold and distributed hundreds of recalled products.

A top American intelligence official is acknowledging that the U.S. has difficulty tracking the movements and activities of Westerners in Syria who have joined rebels fighting President Bashar Assad (bah-SHAR' AH'-sahd).

A Pennsylvania congressman's press secretary pleaded guilty Wednesday to misdemeanor weapons charges, acknowledging that he accidentally carried an unloaded gun and ammunition into a Congressional office building in Washington.

China's military hacked into computer networks of civilian transportation companies hired by the Pentagon at least nine times, breaking into computers aboard a commercial ship, targeting logistics companies and uploading malicious software onto an airline's computers, Senate investigators said Wednesday.

A federal commission planning a memorial near the National Mall honoring the late President Dwight D. Eisenhower considered whether to move forward Wednesday with a famed architect's design after years of controversy surrounding the project.

The U.S. current account trade deficit narrowed slightly in the April-June quarter, reflecting gains in exports of oil and civilian aircraft and a bigger surplus in Americans' overseas investment earnings.

U.S. consumer prices edged down in August, the first monthly drop since the spring of 2013, as gasoline, airline tickets and clothing prices all fell. It was the latest evidence that inflation remains under control.

Cuts to the nation's food stamp program enacted this year are only affecting four states, far from the sweeping overhaul that Republicans had pushed, an Associated Press review has found.

The House passed a bill Tuesday night that could make it a little harder for people to use government welfare payments to buy marijuana in states where the drug is legal.

NFL

The Republican chairman of a special House panel on Benghazi charted a course Wednesday for his investigation to stretch deep into a 2016 presidential election that former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton seems likely to enter.

An American doctor who survived Ebola said there's no time to waste as President Barack Obama outlined his plan to ramp up the U.S. response to the epidemic in West Africa.

The Republican-controlled House voted grudgingly Wednesday to give the administration authority to train and arm Syrian rebels as President Barack Obama emphasized anew that American forces "do not and will not have a combat mission" in the struggle against Islamic State militants in either Iraq or Syria.

The mayor has already heard from plenty of potential buyers for the Atlanta Hawks.

Financial markets are awaiting the end of a Federal Reserve meeting Wednesday to see whether the Fed sends any clearer signal about the timing of an interest rate increase.

The House passed a bill Tuesday that could make it a little harder for people to use government welfare payments to buy marijuana in states where the drug is legal.

The NFL players' union appealed Ray Rice's indefinite suspension Tuesday night, saying that he shouldn't be punished twice for punching his fiancee in a casino elevator.

The House passed three bills Tuesday designed to highlight complaints that the IRS mistreated conservative political groups when they applied for tax-exempt status.

Millions of veterans and their dependents will get a fresh cost-of-living increase for their disability benefits beginning in December, according to legislation that Congress sent President Barack Obama on Tuesday.

Democratic Sen. Tim Kaine has drawn up legislation to authorize U.S. military force against Islamic extremists that would strictly limit the engagement of American ground forces.

A man has been sentenced to time served for parking his truck outside the White House and falsely saying that it contained a bomb.

A $450 million bond financing plan was approved Tuesday for an expansive entertainment district that will include a new 18,000-seat hockey arena for the Detroit Red Wings.

The Defense Department says the U.S. military on Tuesday pressed its expanded campaign against Islamic State militants with five airstrikes across Iraq.

Mayor Kasim Reed said Tuesday he has already talked with six potential buyers of the Atlanta Hawks and expects a sale of the team to move quickly after racially charged comments by owner Bruce Levenson and general manager Danny Ferry.

HealthCare.gov, the health insurance website serving more than 5 million Americans, has significant security flaws that put users' personal information at risk, nonpartisan congressional investigators have concluded.

Broadening its push to improve police relations with minorities, the Justice Department has enlisted a team of criminal justice researchers to study racial bias in law enforcement in five American cities and recommend strategies to address the problem nationally, Attorney General Eric Holder said Tuesday.

Amid action in Congress to intensify the fight against Islamic State militants, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid found time Tuesday for an issue closer to home: ensuring that a nuclear waste dump in his home state of Nevada remains mothballed even after the government has spent $15 billion on it.

Two senators are calling on the White House to hire a permanent chief of the agency that keeps the nation's roadways safe.

The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday gave the public 45 more days to weigh in on a plan that would for the first time curb the pollution blamed for global warming from the nation's coal-fired power plants. The agency said it was still aiming to finalize the rules by next summer.

Corinthian Colleges is being sued by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for what it calls a "predatory lending scheme."

A U.S. senator threatened the NFL with legislation over Washington's nickname, a letter was dispatched to the other 31 team owners, and the issue was linked to the league's others recent troubles Tuesday as the anti-"Redskins" movement took its cause to Capitol Hill.

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton says Vikings running back Adrian Peterson should have remained suspended until an accusation of child abuse was resolved in the Texas legal system.

Minnesota Gov. Mark Dayton says Vikings running back Adrian Peterson should have stayed suspended until an accusation of child abuse was resolved in the legal system.

The poverty rate in the United States has dropped for the first time since 2006, bringing a bit of encouraging news about the nation's economy as President Barack Obama and Congress gear up for midterm elections.

The Social Security Administration has resumed mailing statements to workers letting them know the estimated benefits they will get when they retire, the agency announced Tuesday.

The Obama administration is declining to say whether it will oppose Venezuela's bid to grab a non-permanent seat on the United Nations Security Council.

Both houses of Congress scolded the nation's highway safety agency Tuesday over its tardy handling of a deadly problem with General Motors cars, questioning whether it is competent to guarantee the safety of increasingly complex vehicles.

A look at some of the initiatives President Barack Obama is announcing to ramp up the U.S. response to West Africa's Ebola crisis:

A measure of prices that producers receive for their goods and services was unchanged in August, the latest sign that inflation is in check.

Amtrak's Northeast Corridor service resumed between Washington and Philadelphia Tuesday afternoon after being shut down for a time.

More of the world's children are surviving to their fifth birthday, but 6.3 million still died last year, mostly from preventable causes, the U.N. children's agency said Tuesday.

American investors are clamoring to buy a stake in Chinese e-commerce giant Alibaba, which is launching what may prove the biggest initial public stock offering ever.

Downed wires have suspended Amtrak service between Washington and Philadelphia, and are affecting riders of Maryland Area Regional Commuter trains.

President Barack Obama declared Tuesday that the Ebola epidemic in West Africa could threaten security around the world, and he ordered 3,000 U.S. military personnel to the region in emergency aid muscle for a crisis spiraling out of control.

The United States would retaliate against Syrian President Bashar Assad's air defenses if he were to go after American planes launching airstrikes in his country, senior Obama administration officials said Monday.

A nonpartisan congressional agency is raising new questions about compliance with a key compromise on abortion that allowed the federal health care law to pass in 2010.

American ground troops may be needed to battle Islamic State forces in the Middle East if President Barack Obama's current strategy fails, the nation's top military officer said Tuesday as Congress plunged into an election-year debate of Obama's plan to expand airstrikes and train Syrian rebels.

Osama bin Laden is dead and al-Qaida dispersed, yet the horrors keep coming.

Indian boxers will be allowed to participate at the Asian Games under their national flag after the sport's amateur world governing body gave provisional recognition to a new national federation.

The offender-rehabilitation program former Baltimore Raven Ray Rice entered after knocking his fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator is rarely used in domestic assault cases — but whether that means he got special treatment depends who you ask.

The Obama administration is ramping up its response to West Africa's Ebola crisis, preparing to assign 3,000 U.S. military personnel to the afflicted region to supply medical and logistical support to overwhelmed local health care systems and to boost the number of beds needed to isolate and treat victims of the epidemic.

A nonpartisan congressional agency is raising new questions about compliance with a key compromise on abortion that allowed the federal health care law to pass in 2010.

Requiring police officers to wear body cameras is one potential solution for bridging deep mistrust between law enforcement and the public, the White House said, weighing in on a national debate sparked by the shooting of an unarmed black man last month in Ferguson, Missouri.

Michigan State University and the state Department of Natural Resources have announced an online program to help conservation officers develop and sharpen their crime-fighting skills.

The National Labor Relations Board ruled against the CNN cable television network on Monday in an 11-year-old labor dispute, ordering the network to rehire or compensate about 300 former workers.

U.S. officials said Monday the United States has taken the first step in its planned expanded fight against Islamic State militants, going to the aid of Iraqi security forces near Baghdad who were being attacked by enemy fighters.

The United States would retaliate against Syrian President Bashar Assad's air defenses if he were to go after American planes launching airstrikes in his country, senior Obama administration officials said Monday.

The offender-rehabilitation program former Baltimore Raven Ray Rice was allowed into after knocking his fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator is rarely used in domestic assault cases — but whether that means he got special treatment because of his stardom remains up in the air, depending on whom you ask.

Senate Republicans derailed a Democratic bill on Monday aimed at pressuring employers to pay women the same as men, a vote Democrats knew they would lose but scheduled in hopes of attracting support from female voters in November's elections.

Thomas Hale Boggs Jr., a son of congressional royalty who evolved into a top-tier lobbyist and prolific Democratic fundraiser and embodied what it meant to have Washington clout, died Monday He was 73.

Former FIFA international relations director Jerome Champagne has confirmed his plan to challenge President Sepp Blatter in next year's election.

President Barack Obama's pick to be the government's chief civil rights attorney withdrew his nomination for the post Monday.

Thousands of consumers risk losing financial aid for health care premiums under President Barack Obama's law unless they clear up lingering questions about their incomes, administration officials said Monday.

Congress is dusting off the notion of statehood for the District of Columbia for the first time in 21 years, but that doesn't mean residents of the nation's capital are any closer to gaining representation on Capitol Hill.

Chicago, New York and Honolulu have made the short list to host Barack Obama's future presidential library.

The U.S. says North Korea is using detained American citizens as political pawns, after a 24-year-old Californian man was sentenced to six years of hard labor there.

Advertised as a path to an affordable retirement, federally insured reverse mortgages are showing signs of a rebound, drawing the scrutiny of regulators seeking to reduce historically high default rates that have cost the government billions.

Secretary of State John Kerry will travel to New York this week to chair a meeting of the United National Security Council on Iraq.

Just miles from where former Guantanamo Bay terror suspects have resettled, American warplanes take off from Qatar's al-Udeid air base in the global war on extremism.

When the Federal Reserve issues a policy statement after it meets this week, the financial world will be on high alert for two words:

A federal judge ruled Monday that a Florida woman can pursue her lawsuit alleging the government invaded her privacy in the scandal over former CIA director David Petraeus.

The paths that took Wayne Rooney and Islamuddin Amiri into football couldn't have been more different.

The drilling procedure called fracking didn't cause much-publicized cases of tainted groundwater in areas of Pennsylvania and Texas, a new study finds. Instead, it blames the contamination on problems in pipes and seals in natural gas wells.

In a story Sept. 15 about Bill Cosby loaning African-American art to the Smithsonian Institution, The Associated Press, relying on information from the National Museum of African Art, reported erroneously that Cosby and his wife would lend their entire collection to the museum. They will lend 62 works, not the entire collection of more than 300, according to new information from the museum.

Lawmakers raced Monday to authorize an expanded mission to arm and train moderate Syrian rebels before heading back to the campaign trail, with House Republicans preparing legislation backing a central plank of President Barack Obama's strategy against the Islamic State group.

U.S. manufacturing output declined in August for the first time in seven months, reflecting a sharp fall in production at auto plants that was due mainly to seasonal adjustment problems.

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