A new top-level trauma center has opened to serve the western part of the Phoenix area and western Arizona as far as the California line.

There is more good news about HIV treatment pills used to prevent infection in people at high risk of getting the AIDS virus: Follow-up from a landmark study that proved the drug works now shows that it does not encourage risky sex and is effective even if people skip some doses.

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is holding four events in eastern Kentucky to discuss the region's high rates of cancer, diabetes, heart disease and obesity.

Experts estimate there are nearly 300 adult loons living on Vermont's lakes and ponds, up from just a couple dozen 30 years ago.

President Barack Obama's choice to lead the beleaguered Veterans Affairs Department is going before the Senate Veterans Affairs Committee for a confirmation hearing as Congress considers a bill to help the next VA leader do his job.

For Myra James, the process of going to the gynecologist is now too much to bear.

A new national study shows that nearly 1 in 4 children in Oklahoma live in poverty and the number of children living in high-poverty areas has more than doubled since 2000.

Four hospitals in New Hampshire's North Country are working together to create a coordinated health care network that could improve quality and lower costs.

Researchers at the University of Arkansas have been awarded $1.5 million from the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health to develop new molecules and biopharmaceuticals that improve a patient's immune response against tumors.

Officials at Montpelier's National Life Group say the inaugural Do Good Festival held on the grounds of the company's headquarters raised almost $11,000 for a cancer treatment center at the area hospital.

Nearly three out of 10 kids are living in poverty in Arkansas, but the number of children without health insurance has gone down, according to a national study released Tuesday that shows how children fare in each state.

The British government has announced plans for a public inquiry into the 2006 death of poisoned ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko.

New York ranks among the top five states for children's health, according to the 25th edition of the Kids Count Data Book released by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

Disadvantaged teens may get more than an academic boost by attending top-notch high schools — their health may also benefit, a study suggests.

Arkansas Attorney General Dustin McDaniel has rejected the wording of a proposal to legalize medical marijuana by a group that is trying to put the measure before voters in 2016.

A Republican candidate for Minnesota governor is recovering after emergency surgery to repair a small perforation in his stomach.

The first thing Stacy Johnston noticed in February 2010 was that one side of her nose was plugged up. She figured it was a bad sinus infection.

A union representing 70,000 nurses and caregivers in New York City has reached a tentative agreement with management.

The Atlanta Medical Center is hosting an open house and job fair for experienced registered nurses.

A federal agency said Monday it has no plans to use Fort Knox as a temporary shelter for migrant children, offering assurances after U.S. Sen. Rand Paul signaled that the Army post has been considered as a possible site to house some of the young immigrants pouring across the U.S. border with Mexico.

More than 100 rabies cases have been reported in Arkansas through the end of June — a figure nearly double the norm of just 54 cases in a year.

Lawmakers on a newly formed panel on Monday promised a top-to-bottom review of Virginia's mental health system with the goal of making it a model for the rest of the country.

Virginia House Republicans want to prioritize funding for two new nursing homes for veterans with money originally meant to renovate the state Capitol complex.

A referral from another physician or family and friends is a first step in choosing a doctor, but specialists advise doing some research to finalize your choice.

The rate of people without health insurance in Hawaii has dropped below 6 percent since the implementation of the federal health care law, state officials said Monday.

A Florida widow awarded $23.6 billion in the death of her chain-smoking husband on Monday called the massive verdict a message to Big Tobacco, even though she likely won't see much if any of the money.

A second case of plague has been reported in New Mexico this year.

The U.S. Army has provided $1.4 million for more University of Nebraska research into remote-controlled robotic surgery.

The state Board of Animal Health has voted to adopt standards that align Indiana with a federal livestock identification program aimed at helping agriculture officials quickly track livestock in cases of disease.

An Alaska Army National Guard soldier was wearing a combat helmet and other protective gear when he was attacked by a bear while participating in a training exercise at a military base, officials said Monday.

Atlanta Dream coach Michael Cooper has early stage tongue cancer and has taken a leave from the WNBA team.

California can once again send sick inmates to an $839 million prison medical complex that was closed earlier this year amid staffing, supply and other problems at the site intended to help end years of federal court oversight, an overseer said Monday.

A central New Jersey physician who officials say engaged in a "grossly negligent pattern" of prescribing painkillers has had his medical license revoked.

The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research poll on finding a doctor and evaluating provider quality was conducted from May 27 to June 18 by NORC at the University of Chicago. The survey was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

Scientists have linked more than 100 spots in our DNA to the risk of developing schizophrenia, casting light on the mystery of what makes the disease tick.

U.S. Rep. Denny Heck had his gallbladder removed Sunday in surgery at Providence St. Peter Hospital in Olympia.

A Nicholls State senior who has fibromyalgia and Lyme disease uses her passions for writing and art to prevail over her illnesses.

Health officials on Monday advised patients of a West Virginia pain management clinic to be tested for blood-borne infectious diseases after an investigation found that needles had been reused.

Newbury residents are being told to keep a close eye on their children and pets after two recent rabid fox attacks.

A suspect meat scandal in China engulfed Starbucks and Burger King on Tuesday and spread to Japan where McDonald's said the Chinese supplier accused of selling expired beef and chicken had provided 20 percent of the meat for its chicken nuggets.

The Food and Drug Administration can't use an advisory panel's 2011 report on menthol cigarettes because its members had conflicts of interest, a federal judge ruled Monday.

A pharmacy supervisor at the VA was placed on leave after complaining about errors and delays in delivering medications to patients at a hospital in Palo Alto, California. In Pennsylvania, a doctor was removed from clinical work after complaining that on-call doctors were refusing to go to a VA hospital in Wilkes-Barre.

The athletes' village at the Commonwealth Games welcomed 1,000 more competitors from 25 countries on Monday, and none of them should have to worry about a stomach virus that affected staff at the site last week.

A "rogue" gynecologist who used tiny cameras to secretly record videos and photos of his patients has forced one of the world's top medical centers to pay $190 million to 8,000 women and girls.

The City of Columbia is holding a meeting to talk about what will happen with downtown property formerly belonging to the South Carolina Department of Mental Health.

A federal judge on Monday dismissed a U.S. senator's lawsuit challenging a requirement that congressional members and their staffs to obtain government-subsidized health insurance through small business exchanges, saying the senator had no grounds to sue.

Authorities can't use confidential information obtained through a drug treatment court program to bring new criminal charges, the Montana Supreme Court ruled.

A group in Sheridan says it's prepared to take legal action to prevent fluoride from being added to the city's drinking water.

A high-level attempt by the U.N. chief and the U.S. secretary of state to end deadly Israel-Hamas fighting was off to a rough start Monday: Gaza's Hamas rulers signaled they won't agree to an unconditional cease-fire, Israel's prime minister said he'll do whatever is necessary to keep Israelis safe from Hamas attacks and the overall Palestinian death toll surpassed 560.

A Veterans Affairs outpatient clinic closed because of air concerns is expected to reopen next month.

FOLLOW US | Get more from sacbee.com | Follow us on Twitter | Become a fan on Facebook | Watch Bee news, lifestyle videos | View our mobile versions | e-edition: Print edition online | What our bloggers are saying
Sacramento Bee Job listing powered by Careerbuilder.com
Quick Job Search
TODAY'S CIRCULARS
Sacramentoconnect.com SacWineRegion.com SacMomsclub.com SacPaws.com BeeBuzz Points Find n Save