The U.N. envoy to Yemen says the country's president and a rebel group have agreed to discuss disarming.

The U.S. government has warned Haiti that it risks losing aid if it doesn't hold elections that are more than two years overdue.

The Committee to Project Journalists says an explosion destroyed the car of a journalist in Cameroon who had been warned by the government to be careful over his coverage of security forces.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel says Russian military exercises on its border with Ukraine increase tensions and run counter to a diplomatic agreement it signed just last week.

Residents of a Rio de Janeiro slum that saw deadly clashes with police earlier this week are staging a protest in the Copacabana beach neighborhood.

Iran will cut a portion of its gasoline subsidies beginning Friday, nearly doubling some prices at the pump as part of a second round of cuts delayed since 2012, state television reported Thursday.

The U.N. secretary-general is warning that the 3-year-old conflict in Syria poses a serious threat to the stability of neighboring Lebanon, as thousands of refugees stream into the small country and weapons and fighters are transferred out.

Czech police say a man faces a fine after having a near miss with a train while walking over a level crossing.

What Pope Francis may tell Catholics in private telephone conversations doesn't reflect church policy, the Vatican's spokesman said Thursday.

She's a political novice with a scant presence on the campaign trail, but Marta Linares has one vote that matters more than most in her bid to become Panama's next vice president: that of her husband, outgoing President Ricardo Martinelli.

An international two-day conference on Internet governance is drawing to a close in Brazil as government officials, academics and technical experts from some 90 countries debate how the Internet should be run.

The American government has awarded $4 million to help Haitian families hurt by a drought in the Caribbean nation's northwest.

Pope John XXIII left his imprint on humanity and the Catholic Church he led for fewer than five years, helping propel him to sainthood on Sunday. Here are some highlights, in deeds and words:

Vigilantes are searching an extensive cave system in the hunt for the last fugitive boss of the Knights Templar drug cartel, a "self-defense" group leader in western Mexico said Thursday.

U.S. Ambassador Samantha Power protested the election of repressive regimes including Iran to the U.N. Committee on Non-governmental Organizations which deals with civil society groups accredited to the United Nations.

The most-traveled pope in history, John Paul II left his mark on the Catholic Church and non-believers worldwide. Here are some milestones along his path to sainthood:

Police in Puerto Rico have captured a fugitive who was wanted in connection with a quadruple homicide.

A British private school said Thursday that images of between 50 and 60 of its students were found on the computer drive of an American suspected child predator who killed himself last month.

A Nigerian rights group is urging the United Nations to help secure the release of some 230 schoolgirls abducted by extremists 10 days ago.

The Catholic Church makes saints to give the faithful role models. The process is cloaked in secrecy and open to criticism, given that it deals with science-defying miracles and notoriously politicized choices. In Sunday's dual papal canonization of John Paul II and John XXIII, it also involves rule-breaking, fast-track procedures.

Roofs are torn off, mud bricks are strewn about and walls barely rise from the desert dunes where Timbuktu's storied mausoleums once stood and are now in ruins. Islamic radicals swept in and tore them apart as totems of idolatry, along with other symbols of the fabled city.

An American journalist who was held by pro-Russia insurgents in eastern Ukraine for several days says he has been released and is in good condition.

Ukraine's foreign minister has blasted the Russian decision to start military maneuvers along their border and said Thursday his country will fight any invading troops.

Elusive street artist Banksy says he has nothing to do with an auction of several of his works taken from walls and valued at up to 1 million pounds ($1.68 million).

Puerto Rico hopes to persuade wealthy investors to bet on the U.S. territory at a two-day conference aimed at attracting new money amid the island's struggles to recover from a nearly eight-year recession.

In the past 24 hours, Saudi Arabia has reported four new deaths from a Middle East virus related to SARS and 36 more cases of infection, including a Turkish pilgrim in Mecca.

The U.N. Security Council is expressing rare "horror" at the recent massacre of civilians in South Sudan and threatens sanctions.

Mexican authorities have suspended medical services at a private clinic after a patient was found dead inside a hyperbaric chamber.

Argentina is hoping to have an easier time attracting international investors to exploit its oil and gas fields now that lawmakers have agreed to pay $5 billion to the Spanish company Grupo Repsol for its controlling stake in the YPF oil company.

Uruguay's government is still writing the rules for its legal marijuana market, two weeks overdue now, and President Jose Mujica has asked that no details be released until the regulations are published Friday or Monday.

Formula One boss Bernie Ecclestone rejected accusations of bribery as he went on trial Thursday in a case that could threaten his grip on the sport, telling a Munich court that he was blackmailed by a German banker who received a disputed $44 million payment.

Solid earnings from Apple and Facebook helped shore up global markets on Thursday despite other disappointing earnings and an earlier hefty retreat in Tokyo.

China plans to revoke two crucial publication licenses for Sina.com, which might partially ban the web giant's operations, because obscene content was found during an anti-pornography crackdown, state media said Thursday.

Armenians are making their annual commemoration of the massacre of an estimated 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks, unsatisfied by an unprecedented conciliatory message by Turkey's premier.

A Moscow court decided Thursday to keep Russian opposition leader and anti-corruption blogger Alexei Navalny under house arrest rather than send him to jail pending trial.

The latest partial results in Afghanistan's presidential election show front-runner Abdullah still leading but far from the majority needed to avoid a runoff.

President Vladimir Putin on Thursday called the Internet a CIA project and made comments about Russia's biggest search engine Yandex, sending the company's shares plummeting.

The material that washed ashore in southwest Australia appears to not be from the missing Malaysian plane, officials said Thursday.

Austrian architect and designer Hans Hollein, a winner of the prestigious Pritzker Architecture Prize whose work ranged from big museums through tiny shops to furniture and sunglasses, has died. He was 80.

Police in the Bahamas have arrested two boaters whom officers say were carrying bales of marijuana worth an estimated $1.3 million.

The residents of England's windswept, wave-lashed southwest are Europe's newest official minority.

Pirates pilfered diesel fuel from a Thai tanker off Malaysia's east coast, making two attacks in a week and raising concerns of a rising threat to shipping, a maritime watchdog said Thursday.

Talks between the United States and Japan on a Pacific Rim trade pact have halted for now without any resolution in sight, spoiling plans for a showcase deal during President Barack Obama's visit to Tokyo.

Shell Nigeria's Forcados oil export terminal remains closed seven weeks after it was shut down to repair a sabotaged undersea pipeline, a spokesman said Thursday, amid growing concerns about the industrial levels of oil theft in the world's 13th largest oil producer.

Canadian Foreign Minister John Baird said Thursday that the international community should not accept Russia's "aggression" in Ukraine and committed to help the country develop its democracy.

Syrian government airstrikes struck a vegetable market in a northern rebel-held town Thursday, killing at least 30 people and wounding scores of others, an activist group said.

The civilian head of Congo's vanquished M23 rebel movement says hundreds of rebels are stuck in Uganda as they await confirmation of amnesty from Congo's government.

Caroline Kennedy says she could "absolutely" see herself endorsing Hillary Rodham Clinton for president but she has to decide soon whether to run.

Israel broke off Mideast peace talks and brought the U.S.-brokered process to the brink of collapse Thursday, protesting a reconciliation agreement between the Western-backed Palestinian Authority and the militant group Hamas, the Jewish state's sworn enemy.

The voice was slightly halting, childlike. "Welcome to Miraikan, Mr. President, it is a pleasure to meet you."

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