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  • Illinois GOP Committee
    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2009, file photo, Illinois GOP chairman Pat Brady speaks at a news conference in Chicago. In April 2014, a crop of Republican officials who wanted to oust the former Illinois GOP chairman for his statements supporting same-sex marriage have been replaced in their party positions. Ideological shifts in the party's organizational structure come as Republicans in Illinois and nationally are working to expand and attract women and minority voters as they look to November.
    Nam Y. Huh, File | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Republican Congressional hopeful French Hill participates in a debate in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014. Hill and two others are seeking the GOP nomination in the race for Congress in Arkansas' 2nd district.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    State Rep. Bruce Westerman, left, listens to Tommy Moll during a debate in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014, between the two Republicans seeking their party's nomination in the race for Congress in Arkansas' 4th district.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Republican hopefuls in the race for Congress in Arkansas' 4th District, Bruce Westerman, left, and Tommy Moll greet after participating in a debate in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Republican State Rep. Bruce Westerman participates in a GOP debate for hopefuls in the race for their party's nomination for Congress in Arkansas' 4th district in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Ann Clemmer, center, asks a question to French Hill, left, as Col. Conrad Reynolds, right, listens during a debate between the Republican Congressional hopefuls in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Tommy Moll participates in a debate between Republican hopefuls seeking their party's nomination in the race for Congress Arkansas' 4th District, in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas House Debate
    Retire U.S. Army Col. Conrad Reynolds participates in a debate between Republican Congressional hopefuls in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014. Three area seeking the GOP nomination in the race for Congress in Arkansas' 2nd district.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Wyoming Landslide
    A worker inspects damage to a house at the top of a slow-motion landslide in Jackson, Wyo., on Saturday, April 19, 2014. No one can say when the mountainside collapsing into this Wyoming resort town will give way. But it appears increasingly likely that when it does, it's going to take a piece of Jackson with it.
    Matthew Brown | AP Photo
  • Wyoming Landslide
    A work crew moves a concrete barrier that failed to stop a slow-motion landslide in Jackson, Wyo., as houses and businesses in the slide zone remained at risk on Saturday, April 19, 2014. No one can say when the mountainside collapsing into this Wyoming resort town will give way. But it appears increasingly likely that when it does, it's going to take a piece of Jackson with it.
    Matthew Brown | AP Photo
  • Wyoming Landslide
    A slow-motion landslide is seen Saturday, April 19, 2014, on East Gros Ventre Butte in Jackson, Wyo. No one can say when the mountainside collapsing into this Wyoming resort town will give way. But it appears increasingly likely that when it does, it's going to take a piece of Jackson with it.
    Matthew Brown | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt
    FILE -- In this Thursday, May 24, 2007 file photo, Lebanese singer Haifa Wehbe arrives for the screening of the film "Ocean's Thirteen," at the 60th International film festival in Cannes, southern France. The head of Egypt’s censorship board says he has resigned after the country’s prime minister overruled his decision to allow a film starring Haifa Wehbe to be shown. Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab said he stopped the film from being shown in response to calls from the National Council for Motherhood and Childhood and “to preserve the morals of our children.” In the film, Lebanese sex symbol Haifa Wehbe has a young boy infatuated with her character.
    Kirsty Wigglesworth, File | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt
    FILE -- In this Thursday, May 24, 2007 file photo, Lebanese singer Haifa Wehbe arrives for the screening of the film "Ocean's Thirteen," at the 60th International film festival in Cannes, southern France. The head of Egypt’s censorship board says he has resigned after the country’s prime minister overruled his decision to allow a film starring Haifa Wehbe to be shown. Prime Minister Ibrahim Mahlab said he stopped the film from being shown in response to calls from the National Council for Motherhood and Childhood and “to preserve the morals of our children.” In the film, Lebanese sex symbol Haifa Wehbe has a young boy infatuated with her character.
    Francois Mori, File | AP Photo
  • Arkansas Governor Debate
    Republican gubernatorial candidates Curtis Coleman, left, and Asa Hutchinson greet each other after the two debated in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Arkansas Governor Debate
    Curtis Coleman, left, listens as Asa Hutchinson responds to a question during a debate between the two Republican hopefuls in the race for Arkansas governor in Little Rock, Ark., Saturday, April 19, 2014.
    Danny Johnston | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt
    Presidential hopeful leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, who finished a strong third in the first round of the last presidential election, in June 2012, greets his supporters outside the election commission office in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Sabahi submitted required signatures to the election commission as the final formal step to run in next month’s presidential election. The presidential ballot will be followed by a parliamentary election later this year.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt
    Presidential hopeful leftist politician Hamdeen Sabahi, who finished a strong third in the first round of the last presidential election, in June 2012, greets his supporters outside the election commission office in Cairo, Egypt, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Sabahi submitted required signatures to the election commission as the final formal step to run in next month’s presidential election. The presidential ballot will be followed by a parliamentary election later this year.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • San Francisco Chinatown Crime Entrapment
    FILE - In this Aug. 6, 2006 file photo, Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow smiles after being sworn in as the "Dragon Head" of the Chee Kung Tong in Chinatown in San Francisco. Chow, a central figure in a sweeping San Francisco organized crime and public corruption case, pleaded not guilty. The FBI spent many millions of dollars and used more than a dozen undercover operatives posing as honest businessmen and Mafia figures alike during its seven year organized crime investigation centered in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Now, an increasing number of the defendants caught up in the probe that has ensnared a state senator and an aide are arguing that the FBI and its undercover agents are guilty of entrapment, luring otherwise honest people to go along with criminal schemes hatched by federal officials.
    Sing Tao Daily, File | AP Photo
  • San Francisco Chinatown Crime Entrapment
    In this April 10, 2014 photo, Tony Serra, right, as he speaks next to Curtis Briggs, both attorneys for Raymond "Shrimp Boy" Chow, pictured at left, at a news conference in San Francisco. The FBI spent many millions of dollars and used more than a dozen undercover operatives posing as honest businessmen and Mafia figures alike during its seven year organized crime investigation centered in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Now, an increasing number of the defendants caught up in the probe that has ensnared a state senator and an aide are arguing that the FBI and its undercover agents are guilty of entrapment, luring otherwise honest people to go along with criminal schemes hatched by federal officials.
    Jeff Chiu | AP Photo
  • San Francisco Chinatown Crime Entrapment
    FILE - In this March 26, 2014 file photo, an FBI agent carries out boxes of evidence following a search of a Chinatown fraternal organization in San Francisco. The FBI spent many millions of dollars and used more than a dozen undercover operatives posing as honest businessmen and Mafia figures alike during its seven year organized crime investigation centered in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Now, an increasing number of the defendants caught up in the probe that has ensnared a state senator and an aide are arguing that the FBI and its undercover agents are guilty of entrapment, luring otherwise honest people to go along with criminal schemes hatched by federal officials.
    Eric Risberg, File | AP Photo
  • San Francisco Chinatown Crime Entrapment
    FILE - In this March 26, 2014 file photo, California state Sen. Leland Yee, D-San Francisco, right, leaves the San Francisco Federal Building in San Francisco. The FBI spent many millions of dollars and used more than a dozen undercover operatives posing as honest businessmen and Mafia figures alike during its seven year organized crime investigation centered in San Francisco’s Chinatown. Now, an increasing number of the defendants caught up in the probe that has ensnared a state senator and an aide are arguing that the FBI and its undercover agents are guilty of entrapment, luring otherwise honest people to go along with criminal schemes hatched by federal officials.
    Ben Margot, File | AP Photo
  • Legislature Campaign Issues
    FILE - In this March 17, 2010 file photo, Sen. Damon Thayer, R-Georgetown, talks with the media after a committee meeting in Frankfort, Ky. House and Senate leaders said that a pair of tax hikes and a minimum wage increase, all of which failed to become law, will play major roles in this fall 2014's pivotal races for the Kentucky legislature.
    Ed Reinke, File | AP Photo
  • Legislature Campaign Issues
    FILE - In this Jan. 7, 2014 file photo, Kentucky Senate President Robert Stivers, a Republican from Manchester, Ky., looks over the Senate shortly after it convened on the first day of the 2014 Kentucky General Assembly, in Frankfort, Ky. House and Senate leaders said that a pair of tax hikes and a minimum wage increase, all of which failed to become law, will play major roles in this fall 2014's pivotal races for the Kentucky legislature.
    Dylan Lovan, File | AP Photo
  • University Construction
    FILE - In this Jan. 10, 2013 file photo, Kentucky House Speaker Greg Stumbo, D-Prestonsburg, left, Gov. Steve Beshear, center, and University of Kentucky President Dr. Eli Capilouto, right, laugh during a news conference at the state Capitol in Frankfort, Ky. House and Senate leaders said that a pair of tax hikes and a minimum wage increase, all of which failed to become law, will play major roles in this fall 2014's pivotal races for the Kentucky legislature.
    James Crisp, File | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, inmate Christopher Shaw attends a discussion group at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown received from his visits was that counties would need more money to build more jail cells and to provide the inmate mental health counseling, and education and rehabilitation programs.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, inmates arrive at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown has received from his visits was the counties need more money.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, Michael Atinsky, background left, leads a discussion group for inmates in one of the meeting rooms at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown received from his visits was that counties would need more money to build more jail cells and to provide the inmate mental health counseling, and education and rehabilitation programs.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, Michael Atinsky, right, leads a discussion group for inmates at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown received from his visits was that counties would need more money to build more jail cells and to provide the inmate mental health counseling, and education and rehabilitation programs.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, an inmates works on an essay for a GED class at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown received from his visits was that counties would need more money to build more jail cells and to provide the inmate mental health counseling, and education and rehabilitation programs.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014, inmates gather in the common room at the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown received from his visits was that counties would need more money to build more jail cells and to provide the inmate mental health counseling, and education and rehabilitation programs.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • California Prisons Realignment
    In this March 25, 2014 photo, inmates carry their belongings as they enter the new 192-bed facility at the Stanislaus County Jail in Modesto, Calif. Stanislaus is among the 10 counties that California Gov. Jerry Brown has visited since mid-January, touring jails meeting with inmates as well as with sheriffs, district attorneys, judges county supervisors police chiefs and probation officers to discuss the realignment law that took effect in October 2011. The message Brown has received from his visits was the counties need more money.
    Rich Pedroncelli | AP Photo
  • Las Vegas Hotel
    This Thursday, Feb. 13, 2014 photo shows railroad tracks in front of La Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, N.M. The building is a historic Fred Harvey House hotel built in 1898 to serve as food-and-rest stop along the Santa Fe Railway. In April 2014, the hotel was purchased by Allan Affeldt, who has also restored another Harvey House hotel in Winslow, Ariz.
    Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore | AP Photo
  • Las Vegas Hotel
    This Tuesday April 8, 2014 photo shows the dining room in the century-old La Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, N.M. on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Allan Affeldt purchased the property in April 2014 and plans to restore the hotel which was originally built in 1898 to serve as food-and-rest stop along the Santa Fe Railway.
    Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore | AP Photo
  • Las Vegas Hotel
    Allan Affeldt walks up the stairs of his century-old La Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, N.M. on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. He purchased the property in April 2014 and plans to restore the hotel which was originally built in 1898 to serve as food-and-rest stop along the Santa Fe Railway.
    Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore | AP Photo
  • Las Vegas Hotel
    Allan Affeldt stands in an arch of his century-old La Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, N.M. on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. He purchased the property in April 2014 and plans to restore the hotel which was originally built in 1898 to serve as food-and-rest stop along the Santa Fe Railway.
    Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore | AP Photo
  • Las Vegas Hotel
    This Tuesday April 8, 2014 photo shows a doorknob in the century-old La Castaneda Hotel in Las Vegas, N.M. on Tuesday, April 8, 2014. Allan Affeldt purchased the property in April 2014 and plans to restore the hotel which was originally built in 1898 to serve as food-and-rest stop along the Santa Fe Railway.
    Albuquerque Journal, Eddie Moore | AP Photo
  • Nigeria Contraversial Preacher
    FILE - In this Sunday, Sept. 15, 2013 file photo, T.B. Joshua lays his hand on the head of a worshipper during a service at the Synagogue, Church of All Nations, in Lagos Nigeria. T.B. Joshua's Synagogue, Church of All Nations has branches around the world, and a recent YouTube video even credits him with predicting the disappearance of Malaysian Airlines Flight MH370. Joshua is one of the best-known preachers in Africa and among the most profitable in Nigeria, the go-to faith healer and spiritual guide for leaders such as the late Ghanaian president John Atta Mills, Malawian president Joyce Banda and former Zimbabwean prime minister Morgan Tsvangirai. The man who says he comes from the poor village of Arigidi is worth between $10 and $15 million based on assets, according to Forbes magazine, which in 2011 estimated his personal wealth. The church holds some 15,000 people with outside tents for the overflow and Sunday services are beamed worldwide. Yet critics say this wildly popular televangelist hinders efforts to curtail the spread of HIV and tuberculosis with testimonies by church-goers that faith and his holy water can cure both. He is also accused of taking advantage of his followers and tightly controlling those closest to him, who call him "Daddy."
    Carley Petesch, file | AP Photo
  • Mideast Yemen
    People gather near a destroyed car that was carrying militants in the Sawmaa area of al-Bayda province, Yemen, Saturday, April 19, 2014. A Yemeni military official says an American drone strike has killed nine suspected al-Qaida militants and inadvertently killed and wounded some civilians.
    Nasir al-Sanna'a | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 18, 2014 photo, Frank Broomell Jr. answers a question in Sicklersville, N.J. Broomell, a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard, is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews. Andrews announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Broomell will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and state Sen. Donald Norcross.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 18, 2014 photo, as runners pass nearby, Frank Broomell Jr. listens to a question in Sicklersville, N.J. Broomell, a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard, is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews. Andrews announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Broomell will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and state Sen. Donald Norcross.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor answers a question in Logan Township, N.J. Minor is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Minor will face state Sen. Donald Norcross and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 18, 2014 photo, Frank Broomell Jr. answers a question in Sicklersville, N.J. Broomell, a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard, is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Broomell will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and state Sen. Donald Norcross.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor answers a question in Logan Township, N.J. Minor is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Minor will face state Sen. Donald Norcross and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, State Sen. Donald Norcross stands for a photo near photographs of party leaders in a Democratic Party office in Cherry Hill, N.J. Norcross is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. Norcross was an electrician and union official before he was elected to the state Assembly in 2009. He served there just four days before he was appointed to the state Senate to fill a vacancy left when Dana Redd resigned to become mayor of Camden. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Norcross will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, State Sen. Donald Norcross listens to a question as he sits near political maps of New Jersey, in Cherry Hill, N.J. Norcross is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Norcross will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, State Sen. Donald Norcross stands in a Democratic Party office in Cherry Hill, N.J. Norcross is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat that has been held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Norcross will face Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • NJ Congress 1st District
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, Logan Township Mayor Frank Minor answers a question in Logan Township, N.J. Minor is a Congressional candidate for New Jersey’s 1st District seat held since 1990 by Rob Andrews, who announced on Feb. 4, that he was resigning to take a job with a law firm. In the June 3, Democratic primary, Minor will face state Sen. Donald Norcross and Frank Broomell Jr., a 27-year-old former Marine who is now working on his master’s degree at Harvard.
    Mel Evans | AP Photo
  • Mississippi Senator Memoir
    In this April 21, 2010 file photo, Sen. David Jordan, D-Greenwood, questions then Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Alan Nunnelee, R-Tupelo, about some of his figures on the spreadsheets he provided the chamber, at the state Capitol in Jackson, Miss. The veteran lawmaker has recently penned a memoir that documents changes in the state's race relations and changes in voting rights over his lifetime.
    Rogelio V. Solis, File | AP Photo
  • Mississippi Senator Memoir
    In this March 9, 2011 photograph, Senate Rules Committee member David Jordan, D-Greenwood, votes against a proposed substitute Senate Redistricting plan at the state Capitol in Jackson, Miss. The veteran lawmaker has recently penned a memoir that documents changes in the state's race relations and changes in voting rights over his lifetime.
    Rogelio V. Solis, File | AP Photo
  • US Senate Hagan
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., listens during an appearance in Durham, N.C. Hagan has tried for her first 5 1/2 years in the U.S. Senate to persuade North Carolina voters that being in the middle of the road is a good thing. Hagan released her first commercial in her bid to win re-election, a statewide radio spot criticizing Tillis, even though he's just one of eight candidates in the May 6 GOP primary.
    Gerry Broome | AP Photo
  • US Senate Hagan
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., listens during an appearance in Durham, N.C. Hagan has tried for her first 5 1/2 years in the U.S. Senate to persuade North Carolina voters that being in the middle of the road is a good thing.
    Gerry Broome | AP Photo
  • Beer Growlers
    In this April 12, 2014 photo, Grayton Beer Company owner Jamey Price discusses a proposed bill that could affect Florida's craft brewing industry in Santa Rosa Beach, Fla. Florida allows breweries to fill quart and gallon containers, called growlers, at their tap rooms, but the half-gallon size that’s the industry standard in 47 other states remains illegal. The latest legislation proposed would force breweries to buy their own beer from distributors at a markup before they can sell cans and bottles to brewery visitors.
    Brendan Farrington | AP Photo
  • Beer Growlers
    In this April 12, 2014 photo, Grayton Beer Company owner Jamey Price discusses a proposed bill that could affect Florida's craft brewing industry in Santa Rosa Beach, Fla. Florida allows breweries to fill quart and gallon containers, called growlers, at their tap rooms, but the half-gallon size that’s the industry standard in 47 other states remains illegal. The latest legislation proposed would force breweries to buy their own beer from distributors at a markup before they can sell cans and bottles to brewery visitors.
    Brendan Farrington | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    Steven Scalzo, right, and his wife Jamie Scalzo look for a place to set up their chairs during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy along the Virgin River near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    Rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    People gather along the Virgin River during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal | John Locher
  • Range Showdown
    Justin Giles of Wasilla, Alaska stands guard on a bridge over the Virgin River during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    People wade through the Virgin River during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    Flanked by armed supporters, rancher Cliven Bundy speaks at a protest camp near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    People gather along the Virgin River during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Range Showdown
    Jennifer Scalzo, left, and her husband Anthony Scalzo stand by the Virgin River during a rally in support of Cliven Bundy near Bunkerville, Nev. Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Las Vegas Review-Journal, John Locher | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 8, 2014 file photo, Egyptian satirist Bassem Youssef poses during an interview with The Associated Press in Cairo, Egypt. On Saturday, April, 19, 2014, the Saudi-owned television network Middle East Broadcasting Center says the top Egyptian satirist Bassem Youssef will be off the air until after the Egyptian presidential elections to avoid influencing voters.
    Nariman El-Mofty, File | AP Photo
  • Food and Farm Seed Farming
    In this April 16, 2014 photo, a tassel of corn grows in a field on Pioneer Hi-Bred International land in Waialua, Hawaii. The nation’s leading corn seed companies have farms in Hawaii, but their fields have become a flash point in a spreading debate over genetic engineering in agriculture.
    Audrey McAvoy | AP Photo
  • Food and Farm Seed Farming
    In this April 16, 2014 photo, the Waianae mountains serve as a backdrop to a field of corn on Pioneer Hi-Bred International land in Waialua, Hawaii. The nation’s leading corn seed companies all have farms in Hawaii, but their fields have become a flash point in a spreading debate over genetic engineering in agriculture.
    Audrey McAvoy | AP Photo
  • Food and Farm Seed Farming
    In this April 16, 2014 photo, the Waianae mountains serve as a backdrop to a field of corn on Pioneer Hi-Bred International land in Waialua, Hawaii. The nation’s leading corn seed companies have farms in Hawaii, but their fields have become a flash point in a spreading debate over genetic engineering in agriculture.
    Audrey McAvoy | AP Photo
  • Food and Farm Seed Farming
    In this April 16, 2014 photo, a tassel of corn grows in a field on Pioneer Hi-Bred International land in Waialua, Hawaii. The nation’s leading corn seed companies have farms in Hawaii, but their fields have become a flash point in a spreading debate over genetic engineering in agriculture.
    Audrey McAvoy | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Masked pro-Russian activists play with a ball as they guard a barricade at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine Daily Life
    A young couple shares a tender moment in a street leading towards the barricade in Slovyansk, Ukraine, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Alexander Zemlianichenko | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A masked pro-Russian activist guards a barricade at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • APTOPIX Ukraine
    Masked pro-Russian activists guard a barricade at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian activists guard barricades in Slovyansk, Ukraine, Saturday, April 19, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Alexander Zemlianichenko | AP Photo
  • Oil Trains
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, Pat Miller, 84, stands stands next to the office on the second floor of the Staples train depot once occupied by the man who ran the town’s rail operation, in Staples, Minn. Miller worked as a train engineer based in Staples for 25 years. Staples residents have raised money to renovate the dilapidated depot and transform the second floor into a museum celebrating the city’s relationship with railroads, a collaboration that dates back to the 1880s.
    Mike Cronin | AP Photo
  • Oil Trains
    In this April 15, 2014 photo, an oil-tank train operated by Burlington Northern Santa Fe Corp., based in Fort Worth, Texas, cruises east alongside U.S. 10, a few miles outside of Staples, Minn. Multiple BNSF oil-tank trains travel through Staples every day, pulling about 110 tanks, sometimes more, of highly volatile crude from the Bakken shale fields in North Dakota to refineries east and south of Minnesota.
    Mike Cronin | AP Photo
  • Energy Politics
    FILE - This March 25, 2014 file photo shows perforating tools, used to create fractures in the rock, lowered into one of six wells during a roughly two-week hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. well pad near Mead, Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against fracking, the technique largely responsible for the surge.
    Brennan Linsley, File | AP Photo
  • Energy Politics
    FILE - This March 25, 2014 file photo shows a machine mixing sand and water, left, before it is pumped underground during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. well pad near Mead, Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against fracking, the technique largely responsible for the surge.
    Brennan Linsley, File | AP Photo
  • Energy Politics
    FILE - This March 25, 2014 file photo shows heat from machinery distorts the air as a worker watches over a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. gas well near Mead, Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against fracking, the technique largely responsible for the surge.
    Brennan Linsley, File | AP Photo
  • Energy Politics
    FILE - This March 25, 2014 file photo shows a worker adjusting hoses during a hydraulic fracturing operation at an Encana Corp. gas well, near Mead, Colo. The energy boom is scrambling national politics. Democrats are split between environmentalists and business and labor groups. Some deeply-conservative areas are allying with conservationists against fracking, the technique largely responsible for the surge.
    Brennan Linsley, File | AP Photo
  • Obama Asia
    FILE - This April 17, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the briefing room of the White House in Washington. During his upcoming trip to Asia, the president and the region's leaders will be keeping close watch on the Russian troops amassed on Ukraine's border and the status of a tenuous diplomatic deal aimed at keeping those forces at bay. In Asia, the U.S. response to the Ukraine crisis is being viewed through the prism of the region's own territorial disputes China. Japan and the Philippines _ two of the four countries Obama will visit _ are locked in tense disputes with Beijing over islands in the South and East China Seas and will be seeking reassurances that the U.S. would back them if the conflicts boiled over.
    Carolyn Kaster, File | AP Photo
  • Obama
    National Security Adviser Susan Rice, right, accompanied by Ben Rhodes, deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting, speaks about President Barack Obama's upcoming trip to Asia, Friday April 18, 2014 , at the White House briefing room in Washington.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Obama
    Ben Rhodes, deputy National Security Adviser for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting, right, accompanied by National Security Adviser Susan Rice, speaks about President Barack Obama's upcoming trip to Asia, Friday April 18, 2014 , at the White House briefing room in Washington.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A boy rides a bicycle past a building with Russian and Ukrainian national flags and words reading "Ukraine had sold herself for dollars Russia" in Uspenka village, 4 kilometers (2.8 miles) to the Ukrainian-Russian border, Donbas region, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Dashing hopes of progress raised by a diplomatic deal in Geneva, pro-Russian insurgents who have occupied government buildings in more than 10 Ukrainian cities said Friday they will not leave them until the country's interim government resigns.
    Evgeniy Maloletka | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Pro-Russian gunman patrol a streets in downtown Slovyansk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents defiantly refused Friday to surrender their weapons or give up government buildings in eastern Ukraine, despite a diplomatic accord reached in Geneva and overtures from the government in Kiev.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    A Christian Orthodox boy kisses a bible inside a flower decorated bier during a Good Friday processions, at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, in Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Religion Building
    In this photo taken on Monday, April 14, 2014, Cyprus’ Grand Mufti Talip Atalay, the religious affairs leader of Turkish Cypriots in the breakaway north of the ethnically split country, is seen during an interview at his office in northern part of the divided capital Nicosia. In the background are the portraits of the Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, left, and former Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash, centre. For the first time in nearly 60 years, a Good Friday service was held at the 14th-century church of Agios Georgios Exorinos in the medieval center of Famagusta. Cyprus was divided along ethnic lines in 1974 into a Greek Cypriot south and Turkish Cypriot north after Turkey invaded following a coup aiming to unite the island with Greece. For decades, there was no contact between the religious leaders of the Christian Greek Cypriots and Muslim Turkish Cypriots. But that changed in 2009 with a kind of faith-based diplomacy that has quietly been conducted between the leader of the island’s Greek Orthodox Christian Church Archbishop Chrysostomos II and Turkish Cypriot Muslim Grand Mufti Talip Atalay.
    Petros Kardjias | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    A Greek Orthodox Christian worshiper attends a Good Friday service at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, in Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    Greek Orthodox Christian worshipers hold aloft the bier depicting Christ’s preparation for burial during a Good Friday service at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    A Greek Orthodox Christian worshiper attends a Good Friday service at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, in Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    Greek Orthodox Christian worshipers attend a Good Friday service at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, in Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Religion Building
    In this photo taken on Monday, April 14, 2014, Cyprus’ Grand Mufti Talip Atalay, the religious affairs leader of Turkish Cypriots in the breakaway north of the ethnically split country, is seen during an interview at his office in northern part of the divided capital Nicosia. In the background are the portraits of the Turkish Cypriot leader Dervis Eroglu, left, and former Turkish Cypriot leader Rauf Denktash, centre. For the first time in nearly 60 years, a Good Friday service was held at the 14th-century church of Agios Georgios Exorinos in the medieval center of Famagusta. Cyprus was divided along ethnic lines in 1974 into a Greek Cypriot south and Turkish Cypriot north after Turkey invaded following a coup aiming to unite the island with Greece. For decades, there was no contact between the religious leaders of the Christian Greek Cypriots and Muslim Turkish Cypriots. But that changed in 2009 with a kind of faith-based diplomacy that has quietly been conducted between the leader of the island’s Greek Orthodox Christian Church Archbishop Chrysostomos II and Turkish Cypriot Muslim Grand Mufti Talip Atalay.
    Petros Kardjias | AP Photo
  • Cyprus Easter
    A Greek Orthodox Christian worshiper attends a Good Friday service at the church of Ayios Georgios Exorinos in Famagusta, Cyprus’ breakaway Turkish Cypriot north on Friday, April 18, 2014. It’s the first time in nearly 60 years that such a service during Christianity’s holiest week is being held at this 14th century church. Although the island’s conflict has never been about religion, the service is seen as an example of how faith can help mend the island’s ethnic division.
    Philippos Christou | AP Photo
  • Congress Campaign Analysis
    FILE - This April 8, 2014 file photo shows Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. pausing during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flip sides of the same campaign-season coin, the Republican drive in Congress to repeal the nation’s health care law and the Democratic call to close the pay gap for women have much in common. Divided government assures that neither has even a remote chance of becoming law anytime soon. Instead, they figure prominently in rival strategies to maximize turnout in the fall _ Democrats hoping women will vote in huge numbers, while Republicans try to stoke election year enthusiasm among tea party activists and other conservatives.
    J. Scott Applewhite, File | AP Photo
  • Congress Campaign Analysis
    FILE - This Jan. 14, 2014 file photo shows House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. speaking on Capitol Hill in Washington. Flip sides of the same campaign-season coin, the Republican drive in Congress to repeal the nation’s health care law and the Democratic call to close the pay gap for women have much in common. Divided government assures that neither has even a remote chance of becoming law anytime soon. Instead, they figure prominently in rival strategies to maximize turnout in the fall _ Democrats hoping women will vote in huge numbers, while Republicans try to stoke election year enthusiasm among tea party activists and other conservatives.
    J. Scott Applewhite, File | AP Photo
  • Congress Campaign Analysis
    FILE - This March 12, 2104 file photo shows Sen. Deb Fischer, R-Neb. speaking in Washington. Flip sides of the same campaign-season coin, the Republican drive in Congress to repeal the nation’s health care law and the Democratic call to close the pay gap for women have much in common. Divided government assures that neither has even a remote chance of becoming law anytime soon. Instead, they figure prominently in rival strategies to maximize turnout in the fall _ Democrats hoping women will vote in huge numbers, while Republicans try to stoke election year enthusiasm among tea party activists and other conservatives.
    Charles Dharapak | AP Photo
  • Keystone Pipeline
    FILE -This Dec. 5, 2012, file photo shows Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La. on Capitol Hill in Washington. An indefinite extension to the government’s review of the contentious Keystone oil pipeline, announced late Friday, April 18, 2014, by the State Department, is doing little to quell the political posturing over the project, which has taken on a life of its own as climate change activists duke it out with energy advocates from both parties. For Landrieu, whose competitive race in Louisiana will help determine whether Democrats retain control of the Senate, the delay comes at a particularly sensitive moment. Landrieu recently took the helm of the Senate Energy Committee, and has been touting her new position to argue that she offers voters in oil-dependent Louisiana the best chance to influence America’s energy policies _ including approval of Keystone XL.
    Manuel Balce Ceneta, File | AP Photo
  • Obama Keystone Pipeline
    President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, April 18, 2014, where he presented the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team. The Obama administration is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Netherlands Holocaust Survivors Taxes
    In this Wednesday April 16, 2014 photo, Charlotte van den Berg poses for a portrait outside the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, rear, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam’s city archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps. Van den Berg waged a lonely fight against Amsterdam’s modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the camps.
    Peter Dejong | AP Photo
  • Netherlands Holocaust Survivors Taxes
    In this Wednesday April 16, 2014 photo, Charlotte van den Berg poses for a portrait, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam’s city archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps. Van den Berg waged a lonely fight against Amsterdam’s modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the camps.
    Peter Dejong | AP Photo
  • Netherlands Holocaust Survivors Taxes
    In this Wednesday April 16, 2014 photo, Charlotte van den Berg poses for a portrait outside the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, rear, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam’s city archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps. Van den Berg waged a lonely fight against Amsterdam’s modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the camps.
    Peter Dejong | AP Photo
  • Netherlands Holocaust Survivors Taxes
    In this Wednesday April 16, 2014 photo, Charlotte van den Berg poses for a portrait outside the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, rear, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam’s city archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps. Van den Berg waged a lonely fight against Amsterdam’s modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the camps.
    Peter Dejong | AP Photo
  • Netherlands Holocaust Survivors Taxes
    In this Wednesday April 16, 2014 photo, Charlotte van den Berg poses for a portrait outside the NIOD Institute for War, Holocaust and Genocide Studies, rear, in Amsterdam, Netherlands. Charlotte van den Berg was a 20-year-old college student working part-time in Amsterdam’s city archives when she and other interns came across a shocking find: letters from Jewish Holocaust survivors complaining that the city was forcing them to pay back taxes and late payment fines on property seized after they were deported to Nazi death camps. Van den Berg waged a lonely fight against Amsterdam’s modern bureaucracy to have the travesty publicly recognized. Now, largely due to her efforts, Amsterdam officials are considering compensating Holocaust survivors for the taxes and possibly other obligations, including gas bills, they were forced to pay for homes that were occupied by Nazis or collaborators while the rightful owners were in hiding or awaiting death in the camps.
    Peter Dejong | AP Photo
  • Alaska Education
    Senate Finance Committee co-chair Kevin Meyer, R-Anchorage, center, speaks to reporters during a news conference after the committee unveiled a draft version of an omnibus education bill on Friday, April 18, 2014, in Juneau, Alaska. Also shown are Sens. Donny Olson, D-Golovin, left, and Gary Stevens, R-Kodiak.
    Becky Bohrer | AP Photo
  • Alaska Education
    Senate Finance Committee co-chair Kevin Meyer, R-Anchorage, speaks to reporters during a news conference after the committee unveiled a draft version of an omnibus education bill on Friday, April 18, 2014, in Juneau, Alaska.
    Becky Bohrer | AP Photo
  • Alaska Pipeline
    Members of Gov. Sean Parnell's administration address the House Finance Committee as the committee prepares to advance the governor's gas line bill on Friday, April 18, 2014, in Juneau, Alaska.
    Becky Bohrer | AP Photo
  • Alaska Pipeline
    Deputy Revenue Commissioner Mike Pawlowski, left, addresses members of the House Finance Committee as the committee prepares to advance the governor's gas line bill on Friday, April 18, 2014, in Juneau, Alaska. Also shown is Revenue Commissioner Angela Rodell and Natural Resources Commissioner Joe Balash.
    Becky Bohrer | AP Photo
  • Health Overhaul Website-Heartbleed
    FILE - This Wednesday, Nov. 27, 2013, file photo, taken in Washington, shows part of the HealthCare.gov website page featuring information about the SHOP Marketplace. People who have accounts on the enrollment website for President Barack Obama’s signature health care law are being told to change their passwords following an administration-wide review of the government’s vulnerability to the confounding Heartbleed computer virus. Senior administration officials said there is no indication that the HealthCare.gov site has been compromised and the action is being taken out of an abundance of caution.
    Jon Elswick, File | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    Friends surround Melquin Merchan, an 18-year-old painter from Aracataca, as he paints a portrait of Gabriel Garcia Marquez in front of the house where the Nobel laureate was born in Aracataca, Colombia, Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died at the age of 87 in Mexico City on Thursday.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    A family rides together on a motorbike in Aracataca, the hometown of the late Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez along Colombia's Caribbean coast on Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died on Thursday in Mexico City. Although the author evoked his homeland's beauty in his novels and visited frequently, he never again resided there permanently, instead spending his time in Europe and Mexico City, where his cremated remains will be displayed at a memorial service Monday.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Good Friday
    A table with flowers stands on the street as part of Good Friday celebrations in Aracataca, the hometown of late Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez in Colombia's Caribbean coast, Friday, April 18, 2014. Since the author died Thursday at the age of 87, residents and holiday makers have been flocking to the home where he was born and raised by his maternal grandparents until the age of 8, paying their final respects to a man who was a symbol of pride for a country long torn by violence.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    Children play in an irrigation canal, the local swimming hole that runs though Aracataca, the hometown of the late Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez along Colombia's Caribbean coast during the Holy Week holiday on Friday, April 18, 2014. Although the author evoked his homeland's beauty in his novels and visited frequently, he never again resided there permanently, instead spending his time in Europe and Mexico City, where his cremated remains will be displayed at a memorial service Monday. Garcia Marquez died on Thursday in Mexico City.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Police Shooting Teen
    FILE- In this March 13, 2013 file photo, Carol Gray, left, holds a photo of her son, Kimani "Kiki" Gray, with the aid of New York City Councilman Charles Barron, during a news conference in New York. The family of the 16-year-old Brooklyn boy whose fatal shooting by police sparked days of protests has filed a federal lawsuit against New York City. Gray’s mother and sister filed the suit Friday, April 18, 2104 in Brooklyn federal court alleging officers used unnecessary force in the March 2013 shooting.
    Bebeto Matthews, File | AP Photo
  • Buy the Farm
    This May 31, 2006, file photo shows Dave Minar, who with his wife and family own Cedar Summit Farm near New Prague, Minn., talking about the organic dairy farm. A case set for trial next week is expected to test Minnesota's "Buy the Farm" law, which is meant to require utilities building high-voltage power lines to buy out farms in the way if affected landowners demand it. The case pits the developers of the CapX2020 project against Cedar Summit Farm near New Prague, which fills its old-school glass bottles on site and keeps its cows on a 100 percent grass diet. Owners Dave and Florence Minar say they can't properly operate an organic dairy farm under a 345,000-volt power line, so they're trying to use the law to force CapX2020 to buy their farm and pay the costs of relocating their operation.
    Jim Mone, File | AP Photo
  • Buy the Farm
    FILE-This May 31, 2006, file photo shows organic milk which Cedar Summit Farm bottles and sells organic milk, in returnable bottles at the New Prague, Minn., farm and through upscale grocery stores and food cooperatives in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area. A case set for trial next week is expected to test Minnesota's "Buy the Farm" law, which is meant to require utilities building high-voltage power lines to buy out farms in the way if affected landowners demand it. The case pits the developers of the CapX2020 project against Cedar Summit Farm near New Prague, which fills its old-school glass bottles on site and keeps its cows on a 100 percent grass diet. Owners Dave and Florence Minar say they can't properly operate an organic dairy farm under a 345,000-volt power line, so they're trying to use the law to force CapX2020 to buy their farm and pay the costs of relocating their operation.
    Jim Mone, File | AP Photo
  • Schools Superintendent Lawsuit
    Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill speaks Friday April 18, 2014, about a court ruling that returns her to overseeing operations of the Wyoming Department of Education. Laramie County District Judge Thomas Campbell issued an order Friday codifying an earlier finding by the Wyoming Supreme Court. The high court had ruled that the bulk of a state law that passed last year stripping most duties from the state superintendent of public instruction was unconstitutional.
    Ben Neary | AP Photo
  • Schools Superintendent Lawsuit
    Wyoming Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill speaks Friday April 18, 2014, about a court ruling that returns her to overseeing operations of the Wyoming Department of Education. Laramie County District Judge Thomas Campbell issued an order Friday codifying an earlier finding by the Wyoming Supreme Court. The high court had ruled that the bulk of a state law that passed last year stripping most duties from the state superintendent of public instruction was unconstitutional.
    Ben Neary | AP Photo
  • Bee Safe
    A greenhouse full of neonicitinoid-free perennials, mostly coral bells, Thursday, April 17, 2014 at Bachman's growing range in Farmington. Bachman's is now growing plants at its Lakeville production center that are free of the neonicotinoid insecticide. While the insecticide is probably not the only cause of bee deaths, Bachman's chief executive Dale Bachman calls it a precautionary measure.
    Minnesota Public Radio, Jennifer Simonson | AP Photo
  • Bee Safe
    A greenhouse full of neonicitinoid-free perennials, mostly coral bells, Thursday, April 17, 2014 at Bachman's growing range in Farmington. Bachman's is now growing plants at its Lakeville production center that are free of the neonicotinoid insecticide. While the insecticide is probably not the only cause of bee deaths, Bachman's chief executive Dale Bachman calls it a precautionary measure.
    Minnesota Public Radio, Jennifer Simonson | AP Photo
  • Klamath Water
    Members of the Klamath Tribes present Gov. John Kitzhaber with a blanket Friday, April 18, 2014, outside Chiloquin, Ore., during signing ceremonies for a water agreement between the tribes and cattle ranchers. Kitzhaber said the agrement would be a springboard to healing the community and a special place after decades of conflict over scarce water.
    The Herald and News, Steven Stilton | AP Photo
  • Klamath Water
    Gov. John Kitzhaber, left, Klamath Tribes Chairman Don Gentry, center, and cattle rancher Becky Hyde, sign an agreement Friday, April 18, 2014 in Chiloquin, Ore., to share water on rivers through the tribes' former reservation and cooperate on restoring fish sacred to the tribes. Sen. Ron Wyden, D-Ore., said he would introduce legislation next month in the U.S. Senate based on the agreement ending decades of conflict over scarce water in the upper Klamath Basin. Water was shut off to cattle ranchers last summer during a drought after the tribes were awarded senior water rights in the area.
    The Herald and News, Steven Stilton | AP Photo
  • Illinois Budget Education Cuts
    FILE - In this Aug. 28, 2013 file photo, Lariyah Beasley, a 4-year-old preschool student from Chicago, holds a sign during a rally outside the Chicago Board of Education headquarters in Chicago. Dozens of protesters, including Lariyah's mother and other parents, students and activists, decried the lack of funding for the city's public school students, especially for African American students. Most of Illinois’ 860 school districts would see severe cuts in funding if the state’s temporary tax increase is rolled back as scheduled, according to a document circulated this week as part of Illinois Democrats’ campaign to preserve the tax hike and push to update the state’s school funding formula. The document cites what would be a total of $450 million in general state aid cuts to schools.
    Martha Irvine,File | AP Photo
  • Illinois Budget Education Cuts
    FILE - In this April 2, 2014 file photo, Illinois Sen. Andy Manar, D - Bunker Hill, introduces an education funding reform bill at the State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. Most of Illinois’ 860 school districts would see severe cuts in funding if the state’s temporary tax increase is rolled back as scheduled, according to a document circulated this week as part of Illinois Democrats’ campaign to preserve the tax hike and push to update the state’s school funding formula. The document cites what would be a total of $450 million in general state aid cuts to schools.
    Seth Perlman, File | AP Photo
  • Illinois Budget Education Cuts
    FILE - In this April 8, 2014 file photo, Illinois Sen. Matt Murphy R - Palatine, speaks at the state Capitol in Springfield Ill. Most of Illinois’ 860 school districts would see severe cuts in funding if the state’s temporary tax increase is rolled back as scheduled, according to a document circulated this week as part of Illinois Democrats’ campaign to preserve the tax hike and push to update the state’s school funding formula. Sen. Murphy claims Democrats are using class warfare as a theme of their effort to get voters to the polls. “These are political spin numbers to sell a tax increase,” Murphy said. The document cites what would be a total of $450 million in general state aid cuts to schools.
    Seth Perlman, File | AP Photo
  • Ohio Governor's Race
    FILE - In this April 1, 2014 file photo, Ohio Democratic gubernatorial candidate Ed FitzGerald carries his ballot to a booth at the Cuyahoga County Board of Elections in Cleveland on the first day of early voting for the May 6, primary. FitzGerald released his first radio ad Thursday, Aptil 17, 2014, the same week as Republican Gov. John Kasich released his first television spot.
    Mark Duncan, File | AP Photo
  • Obama Keystone Pipeline
    President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, April 18, 2014, where he presented the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team. The Obama administration is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Execution Drugs Oklahoma Lawsuit
    FILE - This June 29, 2011 file photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Clayton Lockett. Lockett is one of is one of two Oklahoma death row inmates scheduled to be executed who have sued state corrections officials to obtain details about the lethal drugs that will be used to execute them, including their source.
    Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File | AP Photo
  • Execution Drugs Oklahoma Lawsuit
    FILE - This June 29, 2011 file photo provided by the Oklahoma Department of Corrections shows Charles Warner. Warner is one of is one of two Oklahoma death row inmates scheduled to be executed who have sued state corrections officials to obtain details about the lethal drugs that will be used to execute them, including their source.
    Oklahoma Department of Corrections, File | AP Photo
  • ATV Protest Ride
    In this May 6, 2010 photo, Bureau of Land Management's Monticelllo Field Office Manager Tom Heinlein places a BLM "No Vehicles" placard at the trail head of Recapture Canyon on Blanding, Utah's northern outskirts. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Leah Hogsten) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Leah Hogsten | AP
  • ATV Protest Ride
    In this April 16, 2014 photo, members of San Juan Public Entry & Access Rights (SPEAR) hike in Recapture Canyon near Blanding, Utah. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Scott Sommerdorf) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Scott Sommerdorf | AP
  • ATV Protest Ride
    This May 6, 2010 photo shows Pueblo III-period cliff dwellings created by the Anasazi or Ancestral Puebloan peoples between 1150 and 1300 A.D. in Recapture Canyon on Blanding, Utah's northern outskirts. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Leah Hogsten) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Leah Hogsten | AP
  • ATV-Protest Ride
    This April 9, 2011 photo shows an Anasazi ruin in the cliff close to "Lem's Trail" in Recapture Canyon, near Blanding Utah. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Scott Sommerdorf) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Scott Sommerdorf | AP
  • ATV-Protest Ride
    In this April 9, 2011 photo, hikers with the "Great Old Broads" group hikes past a rock formation with what they call "Bubba Glyphs" in Recapture Canyon near Blanding, Utah. The group hiked "Lem's Trail" in order to point out areas that should be protected. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Scott Sommerdorf) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Scott Sommerdorf | AP
  • ATV Protest Ride
    This May 6, 2010 photo shows Pueblo III-period cliff dwellings created by the Anasazi or Ancestral Puebloan peoples between 1150 and 1300 A.D. in Recapture Canyon on Blanding, Utah's northern outskirts. A San Juan County commissioner tired of waiting for the Bureau of Land Management to decide whether to allow ATVs back into Recapture Canyon is rallying a group to flout federal law and ride into the canyon next month. (AP Photo/The Salt Lake Tribune, Leah Hogsten) DESERET NEWS OUT; LOCAL TV OUT; MAGS OUT
    Leah Hogsten | AP
  • Rethinking Pot Deaths
    Edible marijuana products are pictured on display at a medical marijuana dispensary in Denver on Friday, April 18, 2014. Many of the items are far more potent than a single marijuana joint. Two recent deaths have raised concerns about Colorado's recreational marijuana industry and the effects of the drug, especially since cookies, candy and other pot edibles can be exponentially more potent than a smoked joint.
    Ed Andrieski | AP Photo
  • Rethinking Pot Deaths
    A caregiver points out the strength of an edible marijuana candy bar at a medical marijuana dispensary in Denver on Friday, April 18, 2014. In its entirety the candy bar is as strong at 30 marijuana joints. Two recent deaths have raised concerns about Colorado's recreational marijuana industry and the effects of the drug, especially since cookies, candy and other pot edibles can be exponentially more potent than a smoked joint.
    Ed Andrieski | AP Photo
  • Obama Keystone Pipeline
    President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, April 18, 2014, where he presented the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team. The Obama administration is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline past the midterm elections.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, cars block a road following two accidents near Comstock Township, Mich. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver. (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) PHOTO ALL LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL TV INTERNET OUT
    Mark Bugnaski | AP
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, cars block a road following two accidents near Comstock Township, Mich. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver. (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) ALL LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL TV INTERNET OUT
    Mark Bugnaski | AP
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, firefighters attend to an injured person near Comstock Township, Mich., following two accidents. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver. (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) PHOTO ALL LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL TV INTERNET OUT
    Mark Bugnaski | AP
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, a damaged car is seen following two accidents near Comstock Township, Mich. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver. (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) PHOTO ALL LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL TV INTERNET OUT
    Mark Bugnaski | AP
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, a firefighter stands by cars blocking a road following two accidents near Comstock Township, Mich. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver. (AP Photo/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski) PHOTO ALL LOCAL TV OUT; LOCAL TV INTERNET OUT
    Mark Bugnaski | AP
  • Volunteer Firefighter Fatal Crash
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, a firefighter talks to a person near Comstock Township, Mich., following two accidents. A western Michigan volunteer firefighter responding to a head-on crash in Kalamazoo County struck another vehicle, fatally injuring the driver.
    Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group, Mark Bugnaski | AP Photo
  • Senate Montana
    FILE - This Feb. 7, 2014 file photo shows Montana Gov. Steve Bullock, left, introducing his Lt. Gov. John Walsh, as the appointee to the Senate in Helena, Mont. Walsh, standing beside his wife Janet Walsh, replaced U.S. Sen. Max Baucus and is running to keep the seat against Republican U.S. Rep. Steve Daines. Max Baucus’ decision not to seek re-election to the Senate after 35 years opened the door for Republicans to pick up one of the six Democratic seats they need to recapture control of the Senate. But his early resignation after being named U.S. ambassador to China may have bolstered Democratic prospects of retaining the seat they have held for a century, thanks to the value of incumbency.
    Matt Volz, File | AP Photo
  • Senate Montana
    FILE This Feb. 13, 2014 photo shows Rep. Steve Daines, R-Mont., left, speaking at a news conference with Montana Attorney General Tim Fox, in Helena, Mont. Daines is running against Democrat John Walsh for the Senate seat Democrat Max Baucus left earlier this year. Max Baucus’ decision not to seek re-election to the Senate after 35 years opened the door for Republicans to pick up one of the six Democratic seats they need to recapture control of the Senate. But his early resignation after being named U.S. ambassador to China may have bolstered Democratic prospects of retaining the seat they have held for a century, thanks to the value of incumbency.
    Matt Volz, File | AP Photo
  • Felon Voting Iowa
    In this photo provided by the Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office is Cheri Rupe. Rupe Is scheduled to go on trial next month for allegedly voting illegally despite having lost her voting rights due to a prior felony. Her attorney says she will argue that the charge against Rupe is unconstitutional after an Iowa Supreme Court ruling Tuesday made it unclear which felonies cause offenders to become disenfranchised.
    Jefferson County Sheriff’s Office | AP Photo
  • Felon Voting Iowa
    In this photo provided by the Black Hawk County Jail is Michelle Bruno. Bruno has been charged with election misconduct for allegedly voting in the 2012 presidential election despite having lost her voting rights due to a prior felony conviction. County prosecutors say her case will continue despite an Iowa Supreme Court ruling Tuesday that makes it unclear which felony convictions cause offenders to become disenfranchised.
    Black Hawk County Jail | AP Photo
  • Missing Boy Mass
    Massachusetts State Police stand along Interstate 190 where police said a child's body was found Friday, April 18, 2014, near Sterling, Mass. Worcester County District Attorney Joseph Early Jr., said the body has not been positively identified as Jeremiah Oliver, of Fitchburg, but that the height and weight of the body was consistent with Oliver's size. Jeremiah Oliver was last seen by relatives in September 2013 but wasn't reported missing until December. His mother Elsa Oliver and her boyfriend Alberto Sierra are both charged in the case.
    Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Tom Rettig | AP Photo
  • Blue Angels Investigation
    FILE - This March 23, 2014 file photo shows the U.S. Navy's Blue Angels flying over during the national anthem before the NASCAR Sprint Series auto race in Fontana, Calif. The Navy says a California-based officer, Capt. Gregory McWherter, has been relieved of duty because of unspecified alleged misconduct while he was commanding officer of the Blue Angels precision flying team
    Alex Gallardo, File | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014, photo, a U.S. flag rests at half-staff on a cedar pole with the sheer face behind it of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. When President Barack Obama arrives for a visit Tuesday, April 22, he is expected to view the destruction and meet with survivors, first responders, search workers and local officials.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    In Wednesday, April 16, 2014, photo, a search worker surveys water from the Stillaguamish River at the site of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. When President Barack Obama arrives for a visit Tuesday, April 22, he'll find a sewage-smelling swamp of gray clay and brown dirt, woven with roots and branches and dotted with the twisted wreckage of the quiet community.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014, photo, a search dog works through a pile of debris as the search continues for the remaining missing victims of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. President Barack Obama plans to visit the area on Tuesday, April 22, to survey the damage and meet with victims, first responders and recovery workers.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    A search worker walks with a tool Wednesday, April 16, 2014, as the search continues for the remaining missing victims of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. Much of the area currently being searched is only recently accessible due to work done to divert water away from the slide area.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014, photo, excavators work near a muddy debris field from a recently drained area of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. When President Barack Obama arrives for a visit Tuesday, April 22, he'll find a haunting wasteland.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide Obama
    In Wednesday, April 16, 2014, photo, search workers are seen through the jaws of an excavator in the foreground as the search continues for the remaining missing victims of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash., on March 22, 2014. When President Barack Obama arrives for a visit Tuesday, April 22, he is expected to view the destruction and meet with survivors, first responders, search workers and local officials.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • IranAmbassador
    This Feb. 6, 2014 photo, provided by the office of the Iranian President, shows Hamid Aboutalebi, an Iranian diplomat, who was recently named as Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, speaking in his office in Tehran, Iran. President Barack Obama has signed legislation aimed at blocking Iran’s chosen ambassador to the United Nations but says he’s only treating it as guidance. The unusual legislation bars anyone from entering the U.S. as a U.N. representative if they’ve engaged in espionage or terrorist activity and still pose a threat to U.S. security. It’s aimed at blocking Hamid Aboutalebi, linked to the 1979 takeover of the U.S. embassy in Tehran.
    Iranian Presidency Office, Mohammad Berno | AP Photo
  • Medical Marijuana Pot or Guns
    FILE - In this Aug. 17, 2012 file photo, Illinois state Rep. Louis Lang speaks during a legislative session at the Capitol in Springfield, Ill. Illinois regulators finalizing the state's conditions for medical marijuana have removed a proposed rule that would have barred legal gun owners from becoming cannabis-using patients, a person close to the process told The Associated Press. The draft regulations aren't expected to be published until Friday, April 18, 2014. Lang, a Skokie Democrat, was a sponsor of the medical cannabis legislation and sits on the committee that will vote on the rules. He had said in February that he opposed the wording and would work to get the provision removed.
    Seth Perlman, File | AP Photo
  • Medical Marijuana Pot or Guns
    FILE - In this Oct. 16, 2013 file photo, marijuana clone plants that are used to grow medical marijuana are displayed under a light at a medical marijuana cooperative in Seattle. Illinois regulators finalizing the state's conditions for medical marijuana have removed a proposed rule that would have barred legal gun owners from becoming cannabis-using patients, a person close to the process told The Associated Press. The draft regulations aren't expected to be published until Friday, April 18, 2014.
    Ted S. Warren, File | AP Photo
  • Medical Marijuana Pot or Guns
    FILE - In this April 16, 2013 photo, Julie Falco, of Chicago, speaks at a news conference held by the Marijuana Policy Project in Chicago. Illinois regulators finalizing the state's conditions for medical marijuana have removed a proposed rule that would have barred legal gun owners from becoming cannabis-using patients, a person close to the process told The Associated Press. The draft regulations aren't expected to be published until Friday, April 18, 2014. Falco, an advocate who speaks openly about how she has used cannabis to control her pain from multiple sclerosis, said the proposed rule never did make sense.
    M. Spencer Green, File | AP Photo
  • Death Penalty Repeal
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, state Sen. Donna Soucy speaks in favor of repealing the state's death sentence in Concord, N.H. The senate later voted 12-12, which kept the century old death sentence on the books.
    Jim Cole | AP Photo
  • Death Penalty Repeal
    In this April 17, 2014 photo, state Sen. Lou D'Allesandro is seen during the senate's debate to repeal the state's death sentence in Concord, N.H. D'Allesandro voted against repealing the death sentence.
    Jim Cole | AP Photo
  • Klamath Water
    In ceremonies outside Chiloquin, Ore. on Friday, April 18, 2014, Gov. John Kitzhaber, center foreground, prepares to sign an agreement between Upper Klamath Basin cattle ranchers and the Klamath Tribes to share access to rivers and cooperate on restoring fish sacred to the tribes. He is flanked by representatives of the ranchers and the tribes. Behind them are Senators Ron Wyden, third from left background, and Jeff Merkley, second from right, and representatives of the Obama administration.
    U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Matt Baun | AP Photo
  • Illinois DNR Turmoil
    In this March 19, 2014 photo, former Illinois Department of Natural Resources official and unsuccessful Democratic candidate for the 115th Illinois house district, Tony Mayville, and his wife, Charlotte, waiting for results election night at Scheller Playhouse in Scheller, Ill. Illinois Department of Natural Resources spokesman Chris Young confirmed Friday, April 18, that Tony Mayville was dismissed this week from his position as supervisor of mine safety enforcement with the DNR's Office and Mines and Minerals.
    The Southern Illinoisan, Steve Matzker | AP Photo
  • Illinois DNR Turmoil
    In this March 4, 2014 photo, former Illinois Department of Natural Resources official Tony Mayville participates in an event at the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, Ill. Illinois Department of Natural Resources spokesman Chris Young confirmed Friday, April 18, that Tony Mayville was dismissed this week from his position as supervisor of mine safety enforcement with the DNR's Office and Mines and Minerals.
    The Southern Illinoisan, Scott Fitzgerald | AP Photo
  • Governor Election Petitions
    Michigan Democratic gubernatorial candidate Mark Schauer, right, greets supporters holding boxes of petitions Friday, April 18, 2014 in Lansing, Mich. Schauer has made his Michigan gubernatorial campaign official by turning in about 27,000 signatures from all 83 counties to election officials.
    Emma Fidel | AP Photo
  • Keystone Pipeline
    FILE - This May 24, 2012 file photo shows some of about 500 miles worth of coated steel pipe manufactured by Welspun Pipes, Inc., originally for the Keystone oil pipeline, stored in Little Rock, Ark. The US is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline until after the midterm elections. The State Department didn’t say how much longer it will grant agencies to weigh in, but cited a recent decision by a Nebraska judge that overturned a state law that allowed the pipeline's path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebraska’s Supreme Court isn’t expected to rule for another several months and there could be more legal maneuvering after that, potentially freeing President Barack Obama to avoid making a final call on the pipeline until after the election in November.
    Danny Johnston, File | AP Photo
  • Keystone Pipeline
    FILE - This April 19, 2012 file photo shows a truck traveling along highway 14, several miles north of Neligh, Neb. near the proposed new route for the Keystone XL pipeline. The US is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline until after the midterm elections. The State Department didn’t say how much longer it will grant agencies to weigh in, but cited a recent decision by a Nebraska judge that overturned a state law that allowed the pipeline's path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebraska’s Supreme Court isn’t expected to rule for another several months and there could be more legal maneuvering after that, potentially freeing President Barack Obama to avoid making a final call on the pipeline until after the election in November.
    Nati Harnik, File | AP Photo
  • Keystone Pipeline
    FILE - This photo March 11, 2013 file photo shows a wooden stick with a pink ribbon marking the proposed route of the Keystone XL pipeline through farmland near Bradshaw, Neb. The US is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline until after the midterm elections. The State Department didn’t say how much longer it will grant agencies to weigh in, but cited a recent decision by a Nebraska judge that overturned a state law that allowed the pipeline's path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebraska’s Supreme Court isn’t expected to rule for another several months and there could be more legal maneuvering after that, potentially freeing President Barack Obama to avoid making a final call on the pipeline until after the election in November.
    Nati Harnik, File | AP Photo
  • Keystone Pipeline
    FILE - This March 11, 2013 file photo shows a sign reading "Stop the Transcanada Pipeline" in a field near Bradshaw, Neb. The US is extending indefinitely the amount of time federal agencies have to review the Keystone XL pipeline, the State Department said Friday, likely punting the decision over the controversial oil pipeline until after the midterm elections. The State Department didn’t say how much longer it will grant agencies to weigh in, but cited a recent decision by a Nebraska judge that overturned a state law that allowed the pipeline's path through the state, prompting uncertainty and an ongoing legal battle. Nebraska’s Supreme Court isn’t expected to rule for another several months and there could be more legal maneuvering after that, potentially freeing President Barack Obama to avoid making a final call on the pipeline until after the election in November.
    Nati Harnik, File | AP Photo
  • Sebelius Senate Race
    FILE - In this April 11, 2014 file photo President Barack Obama shares a laugh with outgoing Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. A spokeswoman said Friday, April 18, 2014, that Sebelius is not considering running for the U.S. Senate. The statement is in line with comments from Sebelius’ fellow Democrats about speculation that she’d return to Kansas this year to run for the seat held by three-term Republican Sen. Pat Roberts.
    Susan Walsh | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Ukrainian soldiers guard their tent camp near Uspenka village, 4 kilometers (2.8 miles) to the Ukrainian-Russian border, Donbas region, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Dashing hopes of progress raised by a diplomatic deal in Geneva, pro-Russian insurgents who have occupied government buildings in more than 10 Ukrainian cities said Friday they will not leave them until the country's interim government resigns.
    Evgeniy Maloletka | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Masked activists are seen with a banner reading "Donetsk Republic" inside the regional administration building that had been seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A masked activist walks among barricades at the occupied regional administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    An activist wearing a Russian national flag walks with her dog to the occupied regional administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Algeria Presidential Elections
    An electoral worker waits for voters to cast their ballots at a polling station in Algiers as part of the presidential elections, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Algerians trickled into voting booths on a sunshine-drenched Thursday to elect the president of this oil-rich North African nation in an election dominated by the ailing incumbent running for a fourth term.
    Sidali djarboub | AP Photo
  • APTOPIX Algeria Presidential Elections
    President Abdelaziz Bouteflika, sitting on a wheelchair, is to vote in the presidential elections in Algiers, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Algerians are trickling into the polls to elect a new president of this oil-rich North African nation in an election expected to be won by the ailing incumbent. President Bouteflika has ruled this nation for the past 15 years and, despite suffering from a stroke, is running for a fourth term on a platform of stability.
    Sidali Djarboub | AP Photo
  • Algeria Presidential Elections
    Interior Minister, Taieb Belaiz, adjusts his earphones as he announces the results of the presidential elections during a press conference held in Algiers, Friday, April 18, 204. President Abdelaziz Bouteflika won a fourth term in office with a landslide 81 percent of the vote, according to preliminary figures announced by the Algerian government Friday. His chief opponent, Ali Benflis, who garnered only 12 percent of the vote, has already criticized the election as marked by “fraud on a massive scale” after polls closed Thursday and vowed not to accept the results.
    Sidali Djarboub | AP Photo
  • Algeria Presidential Elections
    Ali Benflis, a former Algerian prime minister and one of the five candidates running against Bouteflika, votes in the presidential elections in Algiers, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Algerians are trickling into the polls to elect a new president of this oil-rich North African nation in an election expected to be won by the ailing incumbent. President Bouteflika has ruled this nation for the past 15 years and, despite suffering from a stroke, is running for a fourth term on a platform of stability.
    Anis belghoul | AP Photo
  • Algeria Presidential Elections
    An Algerian woman exits a voting booth before casting her ballot in the presidential elections in Algiers, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Algerians trickled into voting booths on a sunshine-drenched Thursday to elect the president of this oil-rich North African nation in an election dominated by the ailing incumbent running for a fourth term.
    Sidali djarboub | AP Photo
  • Michelle Obama Staying Home
    FILE - This March 23, 2014 file photo shows first lady Michelle Obama walking with her daughters Malia, left, and Sasha, right, as they visit the Mutianyu section of the Great Wall of China in Beijing. When President Barack Obama travels abroad, getting just the leader of the free world doesn’t seem to be enough. Countries want the first lady, too. But Michelle Obama won’t join her husband when he heads to Asia next week and her absence is likely to sting, especially in Japan. It’s the first of four countries on Obama’s travel schedule and the only one welcoming him on an official state visit.
    Andy Wong, File | AP Photo
  • Michelle Obama Staying Home
    FILE - This April 11, 2104 file photo shows first lady Michelle Obama speaking in the East Room of the White House in Washington. When President Barack Obama travels abroad, getting just the leader of the free world doesn’t seem to be enough. Countries want the first lady, too. But Michelle Obama won’t join her husband when he heads to Asia next week and her absence is likely to sting, especially in Japan. It’s the first of four countries on Obama’s travel schedule and the only one welcoming him on an official state visit.
    Jacquelyn Martin, File | AP Photo
  • Michelle Obama Staying Home
    FILE - This April 11,2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama smile after disembarking Air Force One at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York. When President Barack Obama travels abroad, getting just the leader of the free world doesn’t seem to be enough. Countries want the first lady, too. But Michelle Obama won’t join her husband when he heads to Asia next week and her absence is likely to sting, especially in Japan. It’s the first of four countries on Obama’s travel schedule and the only one welcoming him on an official state visit.
    John Minchillo, File | AP Photo
  • Health Overhaul State Exchange
    FILE - In this Feb. 3, 2014, file photo, Yvette Calderon, right, an In Person Counselor for President Barack Obama's new health care law, speaks with taxi driver David Bilewu, a 39-year-old Nigerian immigrant at a city office where Chicago taxi drivers go to renew their license. For Illinois and more than 30 other states that defaulted to the federal government under Obama’s health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to adopt and control their own state-run insurance exchanges.The Illinois Legislature needs to act to approve a new state insurance exchange by May 31, 2014, or the state could lose up to $500 million in federal funding.
    M. Spencer Green, File | AP Photo
  • Health Overhaul State Exchange
    FILE - In this March 27, 2014, file photo, Illinois House Speaker Michael Madigan, speaks during a committee hearing at the Illinois State Capitol in Springfield, Ill. For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack Obama's health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to create their own state-run insurance exchanges. With the chance to apply for hundreds of millions of dollars in federal help set to expire in a few months, even Obama's home state of Illinois is expressing little interest in taking the next step.
    Seth Perlman, File | AP Photo
  • Health Overhaul State Exchange
    FILE - In this Nov. 9, 2009, file photo, Pat Brady, then Illinois GOP chairman, speaks at a news conference in Chicago. For the more than 30 states that defaulted to the federal government under President Barack Obama's health care law, time may be running out to decide whether to create their own state-run insurance exchanges. With the chance to apply for hundreds of millions of dollars in federal help set to expire in a few months, even Obama's home state of Illinois is expressing little interest in taking the next step.
    Nam Y. Huh, File | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A masked pro-Russian activist guard looks through a window of the regional administration building seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Obama Navy Football
    President Barack Obama applauds as he presents the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team, Friday, April 18, 2014, during a ceremony in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington. Navy finished the 2013 season with a 9-4 record, winning the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy for the ninth time in the last 11 years.
    Jacquelyn Martin | AP Photo
  • Obama Navy Football
    President Barack Obama walks from the Oval Office to the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, Friday, April 18,2014, to present the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy to the United States Naval Academy football team. Navy finished the 2013 season with a 9-4 record, won the Commander-in-Chief's Trophy for the ninth time in the last 11 years.
    Carolyn Kaster | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    A visitor takes a photo of the replica of the room of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez at the museum set at the house were he was born in Aracataca, Colombia, Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died at the age of 87 in Mexico City on April 17, 2014.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    A man reads a newspaper fronted with the news of the death of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez, in Aracataca, the town were he was born in Colombia's Caribbean coast, Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died in Mexico City on Thursday April 17.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    Women hold candles during a vigil in front of the Gabriel Garcia Marquez Museum, at the house were he was born in Aracataca, Colombia, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Garcia Marquez, who was was among Latin America's most popular writers, died in Mexico City at the age of 87.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    A woman walks past a mural of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez in Aracataca, the city were he was born in Colombia's Caribbean coast, Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died in Mexico City on April 17, 2014.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    Graciela Fernandez, mourns during a vigil in front of the Gabriel Garcia Marquez Museum, at the house were he was born in Aracataca, Colombia, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Garcia Marquez, who was was among Latin America's most popular writers, died in Mexico City at the age of 87.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Colombia Garcia Marquez
    A man rests across the street from a mural of Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez in Aracataca, the city were he was born in Colombia's Caribbean coast, Friday, April 18, 2014. Garcia Marquez died in Mexico City on April 17, 2014.
    Ricardo Mazalan | AP Photo
  • Obit Gabriel Garcia Marquez
    FILE - In this Dec. 2, 2006 file photo, Cuba's acting President Raul Castro, brother of Cuban leader Fidel Castro, left, chats with Colombian Nobel laureate Gabriel Garcia Marquez during a military parade in Havana, Cuba. Marquez died on Thursday, April 17, 2014 at his home in Mexico City.
    Javier Galeano, File | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide
    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 16, 2014, workers stand near a bulldozer on a berm constructed through the site of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash. on March 22, 2014. Authorities have identified three more bodies pulled from the debris of the mudslide that swept through the Washington town of Oso last month. All 39 victims recovered have been identified, the Snohomish County medical examiner's office said Thursday, April 17, 2014, and four names remain on the list of the missing.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Washington Mudslide
    In this photo taken Wednesday, April 16, 2014, a worker walks along a berm constructed through the site of the massive deadly mudslide that hit the community of Oso, Wash. on March 22, 2014. A steady run of dump trucks Wednesday piled tons of crushed rock to raise the height of the berm constructed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which has allowed workers to pump water out of a main search area and separate it from the river.
    Ted S. Warren | AP Photo
  • Marijuana Easter
    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church poses for a picture with a flyer from his coming service Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Highland Park, Calif. Coleman is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called "Medicated," about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.
    Chris Carlson | AP Photo
  • Marijuana Easter
    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church poses for a picture Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Highland Park, Calif. Coleman is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called "Medicated," about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.
    Chris Carlson | AP Photo
  • Marijuana Easter
    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church poses for a picture Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Highland Park, Calif. Coleman is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called "Medicated," about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.
    Chris Carlson | AP Photo
  • Marijuana Easter
    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church poses for a picture Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Highland Park, Calif. Coleman is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called "Medicated," about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.
    Chris Carlson | AP Photo
  • Marijuana Easter
    Pastor Justice Coleman, founder of Freedom Church poses for a picture Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Highland Park, Calif. Coleman is using medical marijuana imagery and catchy word play to attract new worshippers to an Easter sermon series called "Medicated," about seeking fulfillment through God, not drugs.
    Chris Carlson | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt Uprooting Corruption
    In this Tuesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Hesham Genena, the head of Egypt's oversight body, holds documents at his office in Cairo, Egypt. Genena has created uproar simply because he decided to actually do his job. The head of one of Egypt’s foremost government oversight agencies, he says he has uncovered billions of dollars-worth of corruption, including in the country’s most untouchable institutions, including the police, intelligence agencies, and the judiciary.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt Uprooting Corruption
    In this Tuesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Hesham Genena, the head of Egypt's oversight body, speaks during an interview with the Associated Press at his office in Cairo, Egypt. Genena has created uproar simply because he decided to actually do his job. The head of one of Egypt’s foremost government oversight agencies, he says he has uncovered billions of dollars-worth of corruption, including in the country’s most untouchable institutions, including the police, intelligence agencies, and the judiciary.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt Uprooting Corruption
    In this Tuesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Hesham Genena, the head of Egypt's oversight body, speaks during an interview with the Associated Press at his office in Cairo, Egypt. Genena has created uproar simply because he decided to actually do his job. The head of one of Egypt’s foremost government oversight agencies, he says he has uncovered billions of dollars-worth of corruption, including in the country’s most untouchable institutions, including the police, intelligence agencies, and the judiciary.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • Mideast Egypt Uprooting Corruption
    In this Tuesday, April 16, 2014 photo, Hesham Genena, the head of Egypt's oversight body, poses for a portrait in front of pictures of his predecessors at his office in Cairo, Egypt. Genena has created uproar simply because he decided to actually do his job. The head of one of Egypt’s foremost government oversight agencies, he says he has uncovered billions of dollars-worth of corruption, including in the country’s most untouchable institutions, including the police, intelligence agencies, and the judiciary.
    Amr Nabil | AP Photo
  • TV-Scandal-Finale
    This image released by ABC shows Tony Goldwyn, left, and Bellamy Young in a scene from the third season finale of "Scandal," which aired on Thursday, April 17, 2014.
    ABC, Ron Tom | AP Photo
  • Immigrant Roundup
    Immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally are escorted to a transportation bus after U.S. Border Patrol agents detained about 75 immigrants who'd been living in hut for several days in a brushy area Thursday April 17, 2014 near North 10 St. and Sprague St. in McAllen, Texas. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally after they responded to the area. Most of the immigrants are believed to be from Central America.
    The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez | AP Photo
  • Immigrant Roundup
    Immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally are transported to a bus after U.S. Border Patrol agents detained about 75 immigrants who'd been living in hut for several days in a brushy area Thursday April 17, 2014 near North 10 St. and Sprague St. in McAllen, Texas. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally after they responded to the area. Most of the immigrants are believed to be from Central America.
    The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez | AP Photo
  • Immigrant Roundup
    Everado Sanchez from Honduras, an immigrant suspected of being in the country illegally, waits with other immigrants after U.S. Border Patrol agents detained about 75 immigrants who'd been living in hut for several days in a brushy area Thursday April 17, 2014 near North 10 St. and Sprague St. in McAllen, Texas. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally after they responded to the area. Most of the immigrants are believed to be from Central America.
    The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez | AP Photo
  • Immigrant Roundup
    Immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally sit in a group after U.S. Border Patrol agents detained about 75 immigrants who'd been living in hut for several days in a brushy area Thursday April 17, 2014 near North 10 St. and Sprague St. in McAllen, Texas. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally after they responded to the area. Most of the immigrants are believed to be from Central America.
    The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez) | AP Photo
  • Immigrant Roundup
    A hut made out of grass and tree limbs are viewed after U.S. Border Patrol agents detained about 75 immigrants who'd been living in hut for several days in a brushy area Thursday April 17, 2014 near North 10 St. and Sprague St. in McAllen, Texas. Agents spent about three hours rounding up the immigrants suspected of being in the country illegally after they responded to the area. Most of the immigrants are believed to be from Central America.
    The Monitor, Gabe Hernandez | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Former prime minister and presidential hopeful Yulia Tymoshenko, speaks during press conference in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Tymoshenko arrived Friday in Donetsk in a bid to defuse the tensions and hear "the demands of Ukrainians who live in Donetsk."
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk speaks to lawmakers during a session at the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine's east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Chuzavkov | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A combat vehicle with pro-Russian gunman on top runs through downtown Slovyansk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Britain Politics
    FILE - In this Friday, May 29, 2009 file photo, Senior White House adviser David Axelrod speaks during a television interview in the press briefing room at the White House in Washington. Britain's opposition Labour Party has recruited Axelrod, a top adviser to U.S. President Barack Obama's campaigns, to help with its leader's election bid next year.
    Charles Dharapak, File | AP Photo
  • Britain Politics
    FILE - In this Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010 file photo, Senior White House adviser David Axelrod waits for a television interview in the Briefing Room of the White House in Washington. Britain's opposition Labour Party has recruited Axelrod, a top adviser to U.S. President Barack Obama's campaigns, to help with its leader's election bid next year.
    Alex Brandon, File | AP Photo
  • TV-Scandal-Finale
    This image released by ABC shows Tony Goldwyn, from left, Scott Foley and Kerry Washington in a scene from "Scandal." The popular series ended its third season Thursday, April 18, 2014.
    ABC, Ron Tom | AP Photo
  • TV-Scandal-Finale
    This image released by ABC shows Joe Morton in a scene from "Scandal." The popular series ended its third season Thursday, April 18, 2014.
    ABC, Kelsey McNeal | AP Photo
  • Wisconsin Governor's Race
    In this Wednesday, April 16, 2014 photo Wisconsin gubernatorial candidate Mary Burke speaks with Scott Ziolkowski, an instructor in the Physical Therapy Assistant program at Western Technical College, as she campaigns in La Crosse, Wis. Wisconsin Democrats and their allies who are trying to take out Republican Gov. Scott Walker have invested all their hopes in Burke, a Harvard-educated political newcomer whose father started Trek Bicycle when she was a teenager.
    The La Crosse Tribune, Peter Thomson | AP Photo
  • Wisconsin Governor's Race
    FILE - In this April 15, 2014 file photo Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker shakes hands with supporters after a campaigning in Dane, Wis. Wisconsin Democrats and their allies who are trying to take out Walker have invested all their hopes in Mary Burke, a Harvard-educated political newcomer whose father started Trek Bicycle when she was a teenager.
    Wisconsin State Journal, M.P. King, File | AP Photo
  • Tribeca-Surveillance Documentary
    This April 16, 2014 photo shows Laura Poitras, left, and Johanna Hamilton in New York to promote their documentary film "1971," premiering Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival.
    Invision | Photo by Charles Sykes
  • Tribeca-Surveillance Documentary
    This April 16, 2014 photo shows Pulitzer Prize and Polk Award winner Laura Poitras in New York to promote her documentary film "1971," premiering Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival.
    Invision | Photo by Charles Sykes
  • Tribeca-Surveillance Documentary
    This April 16, 2014 photo shows Pulitzer Prize and Polk Award winner Laura Poitras in New York to promote her documentary film "1971," premiering Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival.
    Invision | Photo by Charles Sykes
  • Tribeca-Surveillance Documentary
    This April 16, 2014 photo shows Laura Poitras, left, and Johanna Hamilton in New York to promote their documentary film "1971," premiering Friday at the Tribeca Film Festival.
    Invision | Photo by Charles Sykes
  • Pakistan Bin Laden Library
    Maulana Abdul Aziz, head cleric of a Pakistani seminary, sits in a library named after slain al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Friday, April 18, 2014 in Islamabad, Pakistan. A controversial Pakistani cleric who runs an Islamic seminary for girls in the capital of Islamabad has named the school's newly built library in honor of Osama bin Laden, his spokesman and a school administrator said Friday. Notices read instructions about library rules.
    B.K. Bangash | AP Photo
  • Pakistan Bin Laden Library
    Maulana Abdul Aziz, left, head cleric of a Pakistani seminary, talks to visitor in a library named after slain al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Friday, April 18, 2014 in Islamabad, Pakistan. A controversial Pakistani cleric who runs an Islamic seminary for girls in the capital of Islamabad has named the school's newly built library in honor of Osama bin Laden, his spokesman and a school administrator said.
    B.K. Bangash | AP Photo
  • Death Penalty Repeal
    New Hampshire state Sen. Bob Odell, R-Lempster speaks in favor of repealing the state's death sentence law on the Senate floor, Thursday, April 17, 2014 in Concord, N.H. Lawmakers voted 12-12, and the tie means that the death penalty will stay on the books. The state has one person on death row, Michael Addison, who was convicted of killing a Manchester, N.H. police officer.
    Jim Cole | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Local residents look at an airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation, in the village of Horodychtvo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A local resident stands by an airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation, in the village of Horodychevo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Local residents stand by an airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation, in the village of Horodychtvo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Local residents stand by an airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation, in the village of Horodychevo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A masked pro-Russian activist guards looks through a window of the regional administration building seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Local residence look at at the destroyed airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation at the village of Horodychtvo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A local resident stands by an airborne combat vehicle which was destroyed during a Ukrainian night combat operation, in the village of Horodychtvo, near Kramatorsk, Eastern Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ukraine is hoping to placate Russia and calm hostilities with its neighbor even as the U.S. prepares a new round of sanctions to punish Moscow for what it regards as fomenting unrest.
    Efrem Lukatsky | AP Photo
  • Heroin Deaths Ohio
    In this April 11, 2014 photo, Heidi Riggs talks about the 2012 heroin overdose death of her daughter, Marin Riggs, 20, who died only 18 months after first becoming addicted, in Upper Arlington, Ohio. Riggs says her daughter couldn't shake the grip of heroin despite stints in rehab and attendance at AA meetings. Ohio says 680 people died of heroin-related overdoses in 2012, a record.
    Andrew Welsh-Huggins | AP Photo
  • Turkey Politics
    FILE - In this Tuesday, June 14, 2011 photo released by the Turkish Presidency Press Service, President Abdullah Gul, left, welcomes Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan in Ankara, Turkey. Turkish President Abdullah Gul has signaled that he doesn’t want to swap jobs with Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan when the presidential term ends later this year. Gul said Friday he opposes a model similar to that of Russia where the president and prime minister have traded places and one has ruled in the other’s shadow. Gul suggested he would not oppose Erdogan if he chose to run for president in the election in August. Erdogan has not made a decision about whether he will seek to become president _ a position that is largely ceremonial but does include the power to appoint the prime minister. He has said he wants a presidency with more executive powers.
    Murat Cetinmuhurdar, Turkish Presidency Press Service, HO, file | AP Photo
  • France President's Adviser
    FILE - In this Wednesday, May 9, 2012 file photo, Francois Hollande's political adviser Aquilino Morelle smiles as he walks to a meeting of the Socialist group at the National Assembly in Paris. The French president’s top adviser has resigned following allegations of a past conflict of interest, striking a new blow to already unpopular Francois Hollande. Aquilino Morelle - Hollande’s political adviser and head of communication staff - announced his resignation Friday, an official in president’s office said. Morelle has denied allegations by news website Mediapart of a conflict of interest while he worked for the government pharmaceutical regulator in 2007, while also lobbying for the drug industry. The report also criticized Morelle’s supposed lavish lifestyle at a time when the government is making harsh cuts in public spending. Hollande’s approval rating has recently hit a new low of 18 percent despite a cabinet reshuffle three weeks ago.
    Thibault Camus, file | AP Photo
  • Murder Suicide Indiana
    Police Chief Richard Hite speaks to the media following what is believed to be a murder suicide involving Indianapolis Metro Police department personnel Thursday April 17, 2014.
    The Indianapolis Star, Rob Goebel | AP Photo
  • Murder Suicide Indiana
    Indianapolis Mayor Greg Ballard speaks to the media following what is believed to be a murder suicide involving Indianapolis Metro Police department personnel Thursday April 17, 2014.
    The Indianapolis Star, Rob Goebel | AP Photo
  • Murder Suicide Indiana
    Officers look at a dark colored vehicle and remove evidence at the scene of a murder-suicide in the 2400 block of Inishmore Court, Thursday, April 17, 2014, in Indianapolis. An Indianapolis Metro Police detective confirmed that the victims were police officers.
    The Indianapolis Star, Brent Drinkut | AP Photo
  • Murder Suicide Indiana
    Activity is seen at the home, middle right, where a murder-suicide occurred in the 2400 block of Inishmore Court, Thursday, April 17, 2014, in Indianapolis. An Indianapolis Metro Police detective confirmed that the victims were police officers.
    The Indianapolis Star, Brent Drinkut | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    An Orthodox priest blesses people on the eve of Orthodox Easter, near barricades at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • APTOPIX Ukraine
    Denis Pushilin, foreground center, spokesman of the self-appointed Donetsk People’s Republic, speaks to reporters inside the regional administration building seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pushilin told reporters that the insurgents do not recognize the Ukrainian government as legitimate. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    This photo taken throughout a window shows people at barricades at the regional administration building that they had seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Ukrainian Prime Minister Arseniy Yatsenyuk speaks to lawmakers during a session at the Ukrainian parliament in Kiev, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine's east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Chuzavkov | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    A flag flutters in the wind over barricades at the regional administration building that has been seized earlier in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. Pro-Russian insurgents in Ukraine’s east who have been occupying government buildings in more than 10 cities said Friday they will only leave them if the interim government in Kiev resigns.
    Sergei Grits | AP Photo
  • Ukraine
    Jewish men and boys prepare to read prayers in a synagogue in Donetsk, Ukraine, Friday, April 18, 2014. A leaflet distributed in Donetsk, Ukraine calling for all Jews over 16 years old to register as Jews marred the Jewish community's Passover festivities for Monday (Passover eve), replacing them with feelings of concern. Leaders of pro-Russian insurgents in Donetsk where leaflets were distributed flatly denied being behind the distribution, describing it as a fake and provocation.
    Alexander Zemlianichenko | AP Photo
  • Chelsea Clinton
    In this image taken from video, Chelsea Clinton, left, speaks to the audience as she co-hosts “Girls: A No Ceilings Conversation,” with her mother, former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, in New York, Thursday, April 17, 2014. The daughter of former president Bill Clinton and the former Secretary of State announced at the event that she is pregnant with her first child at the Clinton Foundation event.
    Ted Shaffrey | AP Photo
  • Russia Putin
    Russian President Vladimir Putin takes part in a nationally televised question-and-answer session in Moscow, Thursday, April 17, 2014. Russian President Vladimir Putin on Thursday rejected claims that Russian special forces are fomenting unrest in eastern Ukraine, but recognized for the first time that the troops in unmarked uniforms who had overtaken Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula before its annexation by Moscow were Russian soldiers.
    RIA-Novosti, Alexei Nikolsky, Presidential Press Service | AP Photo
  • Heroin Deaths Ohio
    HOLD FOR RELEASE UNTIL 12:01 A.M. EDT. THIS STORY MAY NOT BE PUBLISHED, BROADCAST OR POSTED ONLINE BEFORE 12:01 A.M. EDT. This undated photo provided by the Heidi Riggs shows her daughter, Marin Riggs. Marin Riggs died of a heroin overdose on Jan. 28, 2012, two weeks after her 20th birthday. She was among a record number of Ohioans who died from heroin-related overdoses in 2012.
    AP Photo
  • APTOPIX Mideast Iran Army Day
    Wearing ghilli suits, Iranian army troops march in a parade as one of them hold up his weapon, marking National Army Day in front of the mausoleum of the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini just outside Tehran, Iran, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ahead of the parade Iran's President Hassan Rouhani underscored his moderate policies and outreach to the West in a speech.
    Vahid Salemi | AP Photo
  • Mideast Iran Army Day
    Iranian army troops march in a parade marking National Army Day in front of the mausoleum of the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini just outside Tehran, Iran, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ahead of the parade, Iran's President Hassan Rouhani underscored his moderate policies and outreach to the West in a speech.
    Vahid Salemi | AP Photo
  • Mideast Iran Army Day
    Iranian army troops march in a parade, some of them wearing ghilli suits, marking National Army Day in front of the mausoleum of the late revolutionary founder Ayatollah Khomeini just outside Tehran, Iran, Friday, April 18, 2014. Ahead of the parade Iran's President Hassan Rouhani underscored his moderate policies and outreach to the West in a speech.
    Vahid Salemi | AP Photo
  • Australia Malaysia Plane Houston
    FILE - In this April 7,2014 file photo, the chief coordinator of the Joint Agency Coordination Center retired Chief Air Marshall Angus Houston listens to a question from the media during a press conference about the ongoing search operations for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Perth, Australia. Houston has become the global face of the massive monthlong search operation off Australia's west coast to find the missing Boeing 777, which is believed to be resting somewhere on the silt-covered bottom of the Indian Ocean in a patch the size of Los Angeles.
    Rob Griffith, File | AP Photo
  • Australia Malaysia Plane Houston
    FILE - In this April 14, 2014 file photo, the chief coordinator of the Joint Agency Coordination Center retired Chief Air Marshal Angus Houston speaks at a press conference about the ongoing search operations for missing Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 in Perth, Australia. Houston has become the global face of the massive monthlong search operation off Australia's west coast to find the missing Boeing 777, which is believed to be resting somewhere on the silt-covered bottom of the Indian Ocean in a patch the size of Los Angeles.
    Rob Griffith, File | AP Photo
  • Recovery-No No
    FILE - Democratic strategist James Carville and then co-host of CNN's "Crossfire" speaks to the media in this Wednesday, July 28, 2004 file photo taken at the FleetCenter in Boston during the Democratic National Convention. An election-year memo to Democratic candidates: Don’t talk about the economic recovery. It’s a political loser. Carville and others wrote that in head-to-head polling tests the mere mention of the word `recovery’ is trumped by a Republican assertion that the Obama administration has had six years to get the economy moving and its policies haven’t worked.
    Victoria Arocho, File | AP Photo
  • Obama
    President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks in the briefing room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, April 17, 2014. The president spoke about health care overhaul and the situation in Ukraine.
    J. Scott Applewhite | AP Photo
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