Here are the best-sellers for the week that ended Sunday, Aug. 17, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by Nielsen BookScan (c) 2014, The Nielsen Co.

"Cavanaugh Strong" by Marie Ferrarella; Harlequin (288 pages, $.99 e-book)

"Remember Me Like This: A Novel" by Bret Anthony Johnston; Random House (384 pages, $26)

"All Our Names" by Dinaw Mengestu; Knopf (256 pages, $25.95)

Nearly a half century before Michael Brown and Officer Darren Wilson crossed paths on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, a 21-year-old man named Marquette Frye was pulled over by the California Highway Patrol, just outside of Watts.

Since she began her career writing for Seventeen magazine, Gayle Forman's evolution to author of best-selling young adult novels was not a stretch. Her latest book, "If I Stay," has been translated to the big screen and is in theaters this Friday. It is the story of young Mia and Adam's love, music and choices. The 44-year-old lives in Brooklyn, is married and the mother of two young girls. The sequel to "If I Stay" is "Where She Went," available only in book form - so far.

Here are condensed versions of this week's book reviews:

No one is truly ordinary, of course. But it would be easy to be fooled by William Kent Krueger.

"The Invisible Soldiers: How America Outsourced Our Security" by Ann Hagedorn; Simon and Schuster (293 pages, $28)

"How the World Was: A California Childhood" by Emmanuel Guibert, translated by Kathryn M. Pulver; First Second (160 pages, $19.99)

"Your Face in Mine: A Novel" by Jess Row; Riverhead (372 pages, $27.95)

Rankings for hard-cover books sold in Southern California, as reported by selected book stores:

Rankings for hard-cover books sold in Southern California, as reported by selected book stores:

Here are the best-sellers for the week that ended Sunday, Aug. 10, compiled from data from independent and chain bookstores, book wholesalers and independent distributors nationwide, powered by Nielsen BookScan (c) 2014, The Nielsen Co.

"No Good Duke Goes Unpunished" by Sarah MacLean; Avon (382 pages, $7.99)

Mat Honan at Wired did a little experiment, where he liked everything - read: EVERYTHING - in his Facebook News Feed for 48 hours. Even things he hated. He wanted to see how that would affect what Facebook showed him.

"The Invisible Bridge" by Rick Perlstein; Simon & Schuster (860 pages, $37.50)

Here are condensed versions of this week's book reviews:

A recent decision by Facebook to limit the content we see in our newsfeeds could have far-reaching and potentially deleterious unintended consequences for the global nonprofit and advocacy communities.

It's been almost 30 years since Michael Sloan co-created the TV series "The Equalizer."

"What We See When We Read" by Peter Mendelsund; Vintage Original (448 pages, $16.95)

If the last thing keeping you from writing Sherlock Holmes fan fiction were the licensing fees, wait no longer. A judge has ruled that Sherlock and the familiar elements of his stories are in the public domain and, in a strongly worded opinion, criticized the Arthur Conan Doyle estate for its practices.

"Lucky Us" by Amy Bloom; Random House (256 pages, $26)

"Lincoln's Bishop: A President, a Priest, and the Fate of 300 Dakota Sioux Warriors" by Gustav Niebuhr; Harper (212 pages, $26.99)

"Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage" by Haruki Murakami; Alfred A. Knopf (400 pages, $25.95)

Diana Gabaldon's eight-book "Outlander" novel series has sold more than 25 million copies worldwide, yet the author didn't publish her first story - the first "Outlander" novel - until she was nearly 40 and already established in an academic career as a scientist.

"Hope for Film: From the Frontlines of the Independent Cinema Revolutions" by Ted Hope with Anthony Kaufman; Soft Skull (296 pages, $25)

He stands in black boots and black coat, phone at his ear, as if conspiring with a distant demon. He beckons in a rooftop cafe and hangs up. The Hollywood Hills, which he has known since childhood, rise tidy and neat; houses shine, pools glimmer. But to him, the world beyond the artifice of fame and wealth is depraved and neurotic, spooked by age and petulant with insecurity, narcissism and blind ambition.

Fremont Unified School District's superintendent has temporarily shelved a controversial ninth-grade health textbook after roughly 2,200 parents and residents took issue with its sexual bondage topics and other material, and demanded it be kept out of the classroom.

Rankings for hard-cover books sold in Southern California, as reported by selected book stores:

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