The Sacramento Kings plan to start preliminary demolition work on Downtown Plaza early Friday despite a last-minute court appeal by a citizens’ group trying to stop the team’s $477 million arena project.

The Sacramento Kings will begin building their new $477 million arena Friday.

Both Sacramento City Councilman Cohn and Elk Grove City Councilman Cooper are Democrats. They are vying with fellow Democrats, Sacramento City Councilmen Kevin McCarty and Darrell Fong, to claim two Assembly seats currently held by Democrats, Assemblymen Richard Pan and Roger Dickinson, who are seeking an open state Senate post.

A judge cleared the way Friday for construction to begin on the new Sacramento Kings arena.

A judge is poised to remove what is probably the final legal barrier before construction can begin on the new Sacramento Kings arena.

The Sacramento Kings, defending their arena construction project against a citizens’ lawsuit, are demanding that project opponents post a $100 million bond to cover the “substantial” losses the team would suffer if litigation delays completion of the arena.

There will be far more seats in the lower bowl, translating into higher ticket prices. There will be twice as many “premium” seats, including luxury suites and lofts, which will come with VIP perks and be among the most expensive tickets in the house. Those features will more than offset the relatively small total seating capacity, team officials say.

Principled, albeit misguided, opposition to the downtown arena has been replaced by people with outstretched hands in search of cash – lots of it.

A group asking the Sacramento Kings to pay for affordable housing and assist small businesses downtown filed a lawsuit Thursday challenging the city’s approval of the environmental impact report for the planned downtown arena.

See what The Bee's Ryan Lillis had to say during a live chat focusing on construction details for the new downtown Sacramento arena, a project scheduled to begin soon.

All the talk about a new Kings arena in Sacramento will get real in late July, when construction crews start working 17 hours, six days a week. Some days, they’ll be there round the clock hauling heavy materials and enormous pieces of equipment into the heart of downtown.

The city of Sacramento will spend $750,000 on attorney fees defending itself against a lawsuit charging that city officials offered backroom “secret subsidies” to the Kings as part of the $477 million arena deal approved last month, officials said Thursday.

A group of affordable housing advocates, environmentalists and homeless organizations is considering a lawsuit challenging the environmental impact report approved last month by the Sacramento City Council for a new downtown sports arena.

The city of Sacramento and the Kings disputed every claim made in a citizens’ lawsuit citing California’s environmental law in an effort to block construction of the new downtown arena.

A citizens group that has sought a public vote on Sacramento’s arena plans for two years announced Sunday that it has abandoned its latest campaign to force a referendum vote on the City Council’s approval of an arena financing deal.

Rebuffed by a judge, opponents claiming the city of Sacramento gave the Kings a “secret subsidy” for the new downtown arena vowed Friday to continue pressing their lawsuit.

A judge Thursday moved to dismiss a lawsuit accusing the city of handing the Sacramento Kings a “secret subsidy” in the just-approved deal for the new downtown NBA arena.

With City Council approval behind them, the Sacramento Kings on Wednesday launched what they say will be a fast-track effort to build a modern arena in the heart of downtown Sacramento. But, as has been the pattern in Sacramento’s long-running and convoluted arena drama, the team and city may yet have a hurdle to jump. A small group of deal opponents says it is organizing what appears to be a late-hour effort to stop the project.

Join The Bee's Marcos Breton for a live chat at 11:30 a.m. to discuss the Sacramento City Council's approval of a deal that - if it survives pending challenges by opponents - should get work started on a new downtown arena.

Amid a festive atmosphere at City Hall, the Sacramento City Council voted Tuesday night to approve the construction of a new downtown arena for the Kings, ending years of effort and angst.

Fans came out to support the deal to build a new downtown Sacramento arena on Tuesday afternoon, gathering in anticipation of the City Council’s vote on a deal between the city of Sacramento and the Kings.

Sacramento City Council members made their final decision Tuesday night on a deal to develop and build a new downtown arena. After the meeting, Mayor Kevin Johnson and Sacramento Kings owner Vivek Ranadive held a news conference. Replay the events in this live blog.

With the Sacramento City Council on the verge of approving the agreement for a new $477 million Kings arena, city officials have asked a judge to toss out a year-old lawsuit filed by citizens protesting the deal.

After years of backfires and debates, the Sacramento City Council is poised Tuesday to formally approve a financing and development plan for a new downtown arena that will cement the Kings’ future in this city for a generation.

On the eve of the City Council vote on the new Sacramento Kings arena, the team and Mayor Kevin Johnson today will announce the formation of an advisory committee to gauge whether the construction project meets certain goals on local hiring, sustainability and other “community impact” standards.

To manage the city’s end of the financing for a new Kings arena, Sacramento is counting on raising net parking revenues by as much as 50 percent in the next seven years. So how much will parking rates rise? And how often?

Sacramento is poised to make one of the most expensive wagers in its history Tuesday, when the City Council votes on a binding agreement with the Kings to build a $477 million arena at Downtown Plaza. The public’s end of the bargain: a $255 million subsidy. In return, the Kings will convert the downtown shopping center into a silvery-white arena that city officials say will revive the urban core.

In the next five months, the city estimates, the Sacramento Kings will spend $90 million on the new downtown arena.

Sept 17, 1996: Then-Kings owner Jim Thomas proposes downtown arena to replace Arco Arena, just 8 years old. Plan quickly fades, and Thomas demands city help Kings financially or risk losing team.

After years of frustration and false starts, Sacramento city officials completed a definitive agreement Friday evening to replace aging Sleep Train Arena with a new sports and entertainment palace for the Kings.

The Sacramento City Council’s historic vote on the new downtown arena for the Kings won’t take place May 13, after all.

The arena deal between the city of Sacramento and the Kings still isn’t done, although officials continued to insist Friday that the project is on track.

Sacramento’s planned downtown sports and entertainment arena may also be one of the city’s most notable art galleries.

City officials and the owners of the Sacramento Kings on Thursday postponed releasing documents spelling out the final deal terms of the proposed arena at Downtown Plaza while vowing the deal will get done. City Manager John Shirey said the city will honor its promise” to release the documents 10 days before a scheduled May 13 council vote.

Nearing completion on plans for a new Kings arena, city leaders are starting to look at whether it makes sense to also build a new performing arts center in downtown Sacramento.

The Sacramento City Council provided mostly glowing reviews Tuesday night of the city’s plan to help finance a new downtown sports arena for the Kings.

The price tag for the new Sacramento Kings arena just went up, and the team’s development deal with the city has undergone significant changes.

With a climactic City Council vote just weeks away, Sacramento officials plan to release an update Monday on the city’s negotiations with the Kings over the planned $448 million arena at Downtown Plaza.

Sacramentans crammed into Sleep Train Arena on Wednesday night to watch the Kings wrap up their eighth consecutive losing season. Unlike last year’s finale, when a possible move to Seattle was under discussion, the mood was almost purely celebratory.

The number of flashing digital billboards along Sacramento freeways could double as the result of a deal nearing completion between the city and the Sacramento Kings. The plan will allow the Kings to erect six changeable-display signs over the next few years. It’s part of a larger agreement being negotiated between the city and the team’s owners to build a $448 million arena in Downtown Plaza.

The Sacramento Kings’ downtown $448 million arena dream took a step toward reality Thursday with initial City Hall approval of the building design and hundreds of pages of planning and environmental documents, zoning changes and variances.

Sacramento’s planned downtown sports and entertainment arena just got more compact, shorter, and, according to its architect, better.

A coalition of unions and their supporters pressed Sacramento city officials Wednesday to ensure that at least portions of the so-called “ancillary development” surrounding the new Kings arena be unionized, particularly the proposed hotel.

The shovel will be sliced into the ground, the demolition crew crushing away on site, the traffic cramping our style long before Kevin Johnson is inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame.

Flush with a court victory giving the city of Sacramento full control of its planned downtown arena site, officials say they plan to unveil key details of the arena deal in the next few weeks, culminating in a formal City Council vote on the deal May 13.

The city of Sacramento today cemented its hold on the former Macy’s men’s store at Downtown Plaza, the last piece of real estate needed to build the new Kings arena, after an appellate court rejected an effort by the building’s owners to regain control of the property.

The city of Sacramento holds the keys to the old Macy’s men’s store at Downtown Plaza, but a new legal challenge makes it unclear how soon it can be torn down to make way for the new Kings arena.

Should the construction of an arena at Downtown Plaza unearth a burial ground of the Miwok Indian tribe, those relics will be preserved. Same goes for fossils or artifacts from an early city settlement. Should the Pre-Flite Lounge – which has the misfortune of sitting directly where the new arena is planned – also be spared?

For years, Downtown Plaza shoppers have strolled past works from noted local artists. When the mall gets knocked down for an arena, where will the art go?

The financial firms that controlled the former Macy’s men’s clothing store have appealed a Sacramento judge’s ruling to grant control of the property to the city of Sacramento and the Kings through eminent domain.

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