When Jack Gavron built a miniature house and filled it with books for his senior project at C.K. McClatchy High School this spring, he joined a community of about 15,000 Little Free Library stewards worldwide and nearly 30 registered in the Sacramento area.

The season isn’t slowing down with titles or author appearances throughout the Sacramento area.

Summer means travel, relaxation and the companionship of a can’t-put-it-down book or two, or more likely several. The landslide of summer titles will continue into September, when the multibillion-dollar publishing industry will begin releasing its marquee titles in time for the holiday gift-giving season.

Al Pierleoni has two titles to suggest for summer.

In a coup for Sacramento, the 51st annual Western Writers of America convention will ride into town June 24 and stay until June 28, and the public is invited. The posse will make camp in the Doubletree Hotel, 2001 Point West Way.

For the first time in years, the Sacramento Public Library isn’t trying to figure out how to do more with less.

Diana Gabaldon lives in two worlds. In the real one, she’s the internationally best-selling author of the eight-title multigenre “Outlander” series, and resides mostly in Scottsdale, Ariz. “Outlander” is a publishing phenomenon translated into 34 languages across 38 countries, with 25 million copies in print (including the three “Lord John” spinoff novels).

Before Brooklyn became a hipster haven with pricey real estate and the Bronx became the poster child for urban blight, neighborhood life in those outer boroughs was pretty much the same.

The San Francisco-based Commonwealth Club of California, the oldest public-affairs forum in the United States, has announced the winners of its 83rd annual California Book Awards.

In our contemporary era of digital everything, the idea of having a book fair with actual books could be considered naively antiquated or refreshingly daring. Either way the first Sacramento Black Book Fair kicks off this weekend in Oak Park with hopes of becoming an annual event celebrating reading and the written word.

Let’s see if this logic works: Father’s Day is June 15. Dad is a manly guy who has been known to crack the cover of a book or two. This column is all about books. Ergo: Any of the Western- and military-centric titles on this list of manly books would make a thoughtful Father’s Day gift. If not, let him read the Sunday funnies.

New York Times best-selling author Joyce Maynard talked with Sacramento Bee Book Club members about her life with “Catcher in the Rye” author J.D. Salinger, her divorce and her love of pie-making.

The concept was inspired: Get together a group of A-list authors – members of the International Thriller Writers association – and pair them into 11 “teams.” Ask each team to write a short story starring the writers’ main characters, and have those characters interact in head-to-head and collaborative ways. The result is “FaceOff,” edited by New York Times best-selling author David Badacci (Simon & Schuster, $27, 320 pages; on sale June 3).

The big news for Tom Robbins’ legion of true believers is next Tuesday’s appearance of his long-anticipated autobiography, “Tibetan Peach Pie” (Ecco, $28, 384 pages).

CBS apparently has not picked up the pilot for “How I Met Your Dad,” a spinoff from “How I Met Your Mother” creators Carter Bays and Craig Thomas and starring Sacramento native Greta Gerwig.

“When I was 15, I was picking out the clothes I would wear when I became a successful writer,” Mary Higgins Clark once told an interviewer. “I was sure I’d make it, but you first have to learn how to tell the story.”

A debut novel follows Reichl’s four food-related memoirs.

Joyce Maynard is funny, multitalented and generous with her time, but also thrives on drama, is startlingly frank and doesn’t back off from her opinions. All those elements will be part of her presentation when she appears for the Sacramento Bee Book Club.

Anne Perry was a bit jet-lagged. One of many long days, as she constantly roams the world on book tours. Jet lag is her travel companion, so how does she deal with it? “I just keep going,” she said in a prim English accent in a voice brimming with intelligence. “On the plane I drink plenty of water, eat sensibly and take cat naps. I can go right out for 10 minutes and wake up feeling better. Some people wake up wishing they were dead.”

Author Ben Tarnoff links Twain’s greatness to his hobnobbing with the likes of Bret Harte and Ina Coolbrith.

Self-published authors are legion, but not many of them are as young as Sara DuToit of Fair Oaks. The 16-year-old El Sereno High School independent-studies student, singer and fan-fiction writer devoted two years to writing and editing “Hoodview,” available at www.lulu.com and www.amazon.com ($13.91 to $14.37).

From a small trailer near an exercise yard full of honking geese, the men of the San Quentin News put out a paper they hope will reach beyond the gates of the prison where many of them are serving life sentences.

The public telling of young Ben Underwood’s inspirational life and untimely death began with a series of stories by Sacramento Bee reporter Cynthia Hubert, published between May 2006 and January 2009. His story now continues in “Echoes of an Angel: The Miraculous True Story of a Boy Who Lost His Eyes But Could Still See,” written by his mother, Aquanetta Gordon, and co-writer Chris Macias, The Bee’s food and wine writer.

Arguably the most famous line from “Jerry Maguire” – the movie that took super agent Leigh Steinberg from sports-famous to dinner table-famous – is “Show me the money!” But in his meandering one-hour talk to UC Davis law students Wednesday, Steinberg spoke more about finding the “kwan,” a concept from the movie meaning love, respect, community – and dollars.

For a growing number of Protestant churches around the country, programs that encourage congregants to embark on Bible-reading curricula have become a steady trend.

Coping with the loss of a loved one is traumatic, but the loss of a child can be unimaginably wrenching. Sometimes, though, inspiration can come from tragedy, as was the case with Aquanetta Gordon and her teenage son, Ben Underwood.

This miniature book measures only 2 inches by 2 inches and contains 55-word stories.

We’ve been avalanched with phone calls and emails since announcing that Anne Perry will be here May 1 for the Sacramento Bee Book Club.

With the release soon of her 24th novel, Allison Brennan talks about how she became of full-time writer.

Five titles are appealing to readers of all ages for a variety of reasons.

If women are looking for an inspiring heroine, a likely choice would be Kelly Corrigan. The best-selling memoirist is all about the sisterhood and how women can empower themselves, support each other and deal with their own complex roles as mothers, wives and the adult children of aging parents.

The Sacramento Bee Book Club will open its 2014 series of author appearances with Bay Area memoirist Kelly Corrigan, at 6 p.m. Thursday at the Tsakopoulos Library Galleria.

In her second novel, Yiyun Li, the award-winning author and UC Davis professor of English, has written a strange sort of love letter to Beijing wrapped in a murder mystery.

The Sacramento Public Library has been nominated for a National Medal by the Institute of Museum and Library Services in Washington, D.C. The medal is the nation’s highest honor for libraries and museums for service to their communities. In part, the finalists are selected for their “innovative approaches to public service that exceed the expected levels of community outreach.”

In the right hands, nonfiction can be more compelling than fiction. Case in point are two new books by distinguished Sacramento Bee journalists, one who is working, the other who is retired.

Eternal rest can’t be too far off – Bernice Gordon is 100 – but for two nights recently, she didn’t sleep. Didn’t even get into bed.

Dr. Seuss is coming to Fairytale Town.

Our town is multifaceted, all grown up and moving forward. One thing is for certain: Sacramento reads.

Most of her previous 29 novels are titillating scorchers with plenty of sex, glitz and drama.

New York Times best-selling author and Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Anna Quindlen is back in the public eye with her seventh novel, “Still Life With Bread Crumbs” (Random House, $26, 272 pages). It’s a comfortable love story with a happy ending, something of a first in Quindlen’s oeuvre.

Authors on the Move offer the chance for dinner and a chat.

Kelly Corrigan’s “Glitter and Glue,” is the Bee Book Club’s choice for March.

Terry McMillan will appear at Sac State author series.

Arcade Library is not a quiet place. At least not when librarian and roller-derby coach Jessica Zaker is around. The tattooed administrator is on a crusade to redefine the community space with fitness programs.

Take a reading cue from National Book Critics Circle.

Granite Bay's Theresa Ragan toted up $1 million in book sales by March 2013, two years after self-publishing her first novel, but don’t call her an overnight success. Nothing could be further from the truth.

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