Investigations

Health & Medicine

Did Mike Lehmkuhl have to die? How California’s mental health system failed one family

Mike Lehmkuhl had been living on the streets for seven months when he was shot dead in Sacramento’s River District last January. Like hundreds of homeless people in Sacramento, he suffered from mental illness. His family and friends had fought for years to get him into treatment, turning to police, the county and courts for help. Now, like so many other families, they’re left asking why Mike couldn’t get the intervention he needed.

Local

Black children die at alarming rate in Sacramento County, and here’s why

African American children are dying at alarming rates in Sacramento County – more than twice the rate of white children and about three times the rate of Latino and Asian youths. More than a third of black child deaths occur in the womb or the first weeks of life. County officials are heading into neighborhoods to try to change that pattern.

Education

UC Davis Chancellor Katehi steps down under pressure

​UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi resigned Tuesday, giving up on her months-long quest to save her job in the face of allegations of nepotism, misuse of student funds and lying about her involvement in hiring firms to bolster her online reputation and the university’s.

City Beat

Shuttered gun range in south Sacramento park leaked toxic lead dust

City officials shut down the James G. Mangan Rifle and Pistol Range in south Sacramento more than 15 months ago, and a “temporarily closed” note on the side door is the only notice area residents received. The city closed the range because it was polluted with lead dust after decades of operation. It has never cleaned that toxic dust from the interior of the shuttered range, nor from the roof. Experts say that may pose a hazard for park users and residents.

Nursing Homes

Shifting population in California nursing homes creates ‘dangerous mix’

Once thought of as “rest homes” for the frail and elderly, California nursing homes are changing. Today’s residents are getting younger – 1 in 5 is now under 65. And some come in with unique circumstances: mental illness, drug addiction, homelessness and criminal histories. The mix, say advocates, is volatile and sometimes dangerous. The Sacramento Bee investigates.

Afghan Refugees

Photographs from "No Safe Place" - a special report by The Sacramento Bee

The Bee is hosting a forum Wednesday called “No Safe Place: A Community Conversation” at the California Museum in an effort to discuss solutions to the Afghans’ plight. Sacramento Congresswoman Doris Matsui, reacting to an investigation by The Sacramento Bee, has formally requested that the federal General Accountability Office evaluate how to improve the resettlement process for Afghan refugees arriving in the United States on Special Immigrant Visas.

Videos

Photographs from "No Safe Place" - a special report by The Sacramento Bee

The Bee is hosting a forum Wednesday called “No Safe Place: A Community Conversation” at the California Museum in an effort to discuss solutions to the Afghans’ plight. Sacramento Congresswoman Doris Matsui, reacting to an investigation by The Sacramento Bee, has formally requested that the federal General Accountability Office evaluate how to improve the resettlement process for Afghan refugees arriving in the United States on Special Immigrant Visas.
Photographs from 2:33

Photographs from "No Safe Place" - a special report by The Sacramento Bee

Afghan allies from war on terror struggle to find the American dream 11:15

Afghan allies from war on terror struggle to find the American dream

Female Afghan visa holder runs struggling day care to make ends meet 1:13

Female Afghan visa holder runs struggling day care to make ends meet

In Afghanistan he feared death as a military interpreter, in Sacramento he fears the future 1:28

In Afghanistan he feared death as a military interpreter, in Sacramento he fears the future