Investigations

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How the tunnel project might affect Delta landowners 2:43

How the tunnel project might affect Delta landowners

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Rescuers in Mexico work to rescue girl trapped in earthquake rubble

Protesters disrupt Republican Congressman Tom McClintock town hall 1:23

Protesters disrupt Republican Congressman Tom McClintock town hall

Spencer Webb of Christian Brothers prepares for Friday night football 0:54

Spencer Webb of Christian Brothers prepares for Friday night football

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What Deschutes Brewery Street Pub is all about

Midtown Association steps up efforts to serve the homeless 1:07

Midtown Association steps up efforts to serve the homeless

Sacramento sheriff is looking for these young burglary suspects 0:22

Sacramento sheriff is looking for these young burglary suspects

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49ers vs. Rams: Three players to watch in Week 3

Parents and educators voice opinions on the teaching of controversial topics 3:14

Parents and educators voice opinions on the teaching of controversial topics

Here's how the rain and snow will develop over the Sierra 0:12

Here's how the rain and snow will develop over the Sierra

  • The birth of Oroville Dam: Watch 1960s construction of tallest dam in the U.S.

    A 1990s documentary uses archival footage to detail the construction of the Oroville Dam, an earthfill embankment dam on the Feather River east of the city of Oroville, California, in the United States that was built during the period 1961 to 1968. At 770 feet, it is the tallest dam in the United States and serves mainly for water supply, hydroelectricity generation and flood control. The dam's main and emergency spillways were significantly damaged in February 2017. This prompted the evacuation of more than 180,000 people living downstream along the Feather River.

Water & Drought

‘Lethal arrogance’? Oroville Dam crisis sprang from Pat Brown’s towering ambition

California Governor Pat Brown’s zeal in erecting the Oroville Dam in the 1960s left a mess for his son, current Gov. Jerry Brown, to clean up.

Crime - Sacto 911

Two police killings two decades apart leave same questions for Sacramento families

The Police Department will meet with city officials on Tuesday to decide whether to pursue an internal affairs investigation into the July shooting death of Joseph Mann. Officer John Tennis, one of two officers who fired shots, may have inflicted the injury that killed another suspect in 1997. The families of those two victims are waiting to see if police accountability has changed in the decades between the deaths.

Investigations

Sacramento sheriff revokes dozens of concealed carry permits following arrests, gun crimes

In the years since Sheriff Scott Jones took office, concealed carry permits have surged in Sacramento County, and now number about 8,000. As of February of this year, Jones had revoked more than 150 county-issued permits for a variety of reasons, including gun-related crimes. In 2015, Jones’ office had a higher rate of revocations to permits than any of the other 25 counties with the most active permits that year.

Health & Medicine

Did Mike Lehmkuhl have to die? How California’s mental health system failed one family

Mike Lehmkuhl had been living on the streets for seven months when he was shot dead in Sacramento’s River District last January. Like hundreds of homeless people in Sacramento, he suffered from mental illness. His family and friends had fought for years to get him into treatment, turning to police, the county and courts for help. Now, like so many other families, they’re left asking why Mike couldn’t get the intervention he needed.

Local

Black children die at alarming rate in Sacramento County, and here’s why

African American children are dying at alarming rates in Sacramento County – more than twice the rate of white children and about three times the rate of Latino and Asian youths. More than a third of black child deaths occur in the womb or the first weeks of life. County officials are heading into neighborhoods to try to change that pattern.

Education

UC Davis Chancellor Katehi steps down under pressure

​UC Davis Chancellor Linda P.B. Katehi resigned Tuesday, giving up on her months-long quest to save her job in the face of allegations of nepotism, misuse of student funds and lying about her involvement in hiring firms to bolster her online reputation and the university’s.

Videos

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Rescuers in Mexico work to rescue girl trapped in earthquake rubble 1:31

Rescuers in Mexico work to rescue girl trapped in earthquake rubble

Protesters disrupt Republican Congressman Tom McClintock town hall 1:23

Protesters disrupt Republican Congressman Tom McClintock town hall

How the tunnel project might affect Delta landowners 2:43

How the tunnel project might affect Delta landowners

Spencer Webb of Christian Brothers prepares for Friday night football 0:54

Spencer Webb of Christian Brothers prepares for Friday night football

49ers vs. Rams: Three players to watch in Week 3 1:30

49ers vs. Rams: Three players to watch in Week 3

Midtown Association steps up efforts to serve the homeless 1:07

Midtown Association steps up efforts to serve the homeless

Sacramento sheriff is looking for these young burglary suspects 0:22

Sacramento sheriff is looking for these young burglary suspects

Parents and educators voice opinions on the teaching of controversial topics 3:14

Parents and educators voice opinions on the teaching of controversial topics

California lawmakers tackle Donald Trump and student hunger in resolutions 1:37

California lawmakers tackle Donald Trump and student hunger in resolutions

Here's how the rain and snow will develop over the Sierra 0:12

Here's how the rain and snow will develop over the Sierra

Assessor's Office managers got bigger tax reductions than neighbors in these neighborhoods

Former Assessor Kathleen Kelleher and former Assistant Assessor John Solie received significantly lower valuations than neighboring property owners during the recessionary housing crash. One difference: their properties were appraised by outside assessors under rules designed to prevent conflicts of interest. Neighbors had their properties valued by a mass appraisal computer system.
Brad Branan bbranan@sacbee.com
Assessor's Office managers got bigger tax reductions than neighbors in these neighborhoods 1:09

Assessor's Office managers got bigger tax reductions than neighbors in these neighborhoods

How a house party turned deadly for a Sacramento teen 2:17

How a house party turned deadly for a Sacramento teen

A dead teen in a park. The story of a cold case 3:20

A dead teen in a park. The story of a cold case

A dead teen, a killer on the loose, a mother’s grief 2:01

A dead teen, a killer on the loose, a mother’s grief