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  • Video: How the collapsed Folsom stairway was built

    After recent fatal collapses of an apartment stairwell in Folsom and a balcony in Berkeley, officials said rotted wood failed to support the weight of the victims. While building experts don’t know how widespread the underlying conditions are, they say problems are common enough that another building failure could happen and that lawmakers and the construction industry should work together to find solutions.

After recent fatal collapses of an apartment stairwell in Folsom and a balcony in Berkeley, officials said rotted wood failed to support the weight of the victims. While building experts don’t know how widespread the underlying conditions are, they say problems are common enough that another building failure could happen and that lawmakers and the construction industry should work together to find solutions. Nathaniel Levine The Sacramento Bee
After recent fatal collapses of an apartment stairwell in Folsom and a balcony in Berkeley, officials said rotted wood failed to support the weight of the victims. While building experts don’t know how widespread the underlying conditions are, they say problems are common enough that another building failure could happen and that lawmakers and the construction industry should work together to find solutions. Nathaniel Levine The Sacramento Bee

Collapses in Folsom, Berkeley invite scrutiny of building flaws

July 21, 2015 05:01 PM

UPDATED July 22, 2015 07:24 PM

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'A deranged, paranoid killer' 7:00

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