A jack rabbit pauses in an undeveloped lot in the Natomas area of Sacramento on Friday, May 30, 2014. Housing and commercial development could resume in Sacramento’s Natomas region as soon as June, more than six years after flood risks prompted the federal government to shut down construction. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is poised to lift the building restrictions it imposed in December 2008. Those limits resulted from the discovery that water could seep through the levees protecting Natomas, a large basin just north of downtown that’s ringed by the Sacramento and American rivers and two creeks.
A jack rabbit pauses in an undeveloped lot in the Natomas area of Sacramento on Friday, May 30, 2014. Housing and commercial development could resume in Sacramento’s Natomas region as soon as June, more than six years after flood risks prompted the federal government to shut down construction. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is poised to lift the building restrictions it imposed in December 2008. Those limits resulted from the discovery that water could seep through the levees protecting Natomas, a large basin just north of downtown that’s ringed by the Sacramento and American rivers and two creeks. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com
A jack rabbit pauses in an undeveloped lot in the Natomas area of Sacramento on Friday, May 30, 2014. Housing and commercial development could resume in Sacramento’s Natomas region as soon as June, more than six years after flood risks prompted the federal government to shut down construction. The Federal Emergency Management Agency is poised to lift the building restrictions it imposed in December 2008. Those limits resulted from the discovery that water could seep through the levees protecting Natomas, a large basin just north of downtown that’s ringed by the Sacramento and American rivers and two creeks. Randall Benton rbenton@sacbee.com

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