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    Northern California's Yurok and Hoopa Valley tribes thrive on the salmon population in the Klamath River. With water levels getting lower, they are doing everything possible to preserve the river's strained ecosystem and to prevent another historic die-off that killed 70,000 salmon in 2002. There is a solution, but it comes at the expense of “big Ag” in the Central Valley.

Northern California's Yurok and Hoopa Valley tribes thrive on the salmon population in the Klamath River. With water levels getting lower, they are doing everything possible to preserve the river's strained ecosystem and to prevent another historic die-off that killed 70,000 salmon in 2002. There is a solution, but it comes at the expense of “big Ag” in the Central Valley.
Northern California's Yurok and Hoopa Valley tribes thrive on the salmon population in the Klamath River. With water levels getting lower, they are doing everything possible to preserve the river's strained ecosystem and to prevent another historic die-off that killed 70,000 salmon in 2002. There is a solution, but it comes at the expense of “big Ag” in the Central Valley.

New genetic evidence could have major implications in the fight to save spring-run Chinook

August 16, 2017 11:33 AM

UPDATED August 17, 2017 08:12 AM

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