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  • Video: Bats swarm and survive under I-80

    During the summer, a colony of Mexican free-tailed bats lives underneath the Interstate 80 Yolo Causeway and swarms nightly to feed on the insects of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area.

During the summer, a colony of Mexican free-tailed bats lives underneath the Interstate 80 Yolo Causeway and swarms nightly to feed on the insects of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area. Madeline Lear and Hector Amezcua The Sacramento Bee
During the summer, a colony of Mexican free-tailed bats lives underneath the Interstate 80 Yolo Causeway and swarms nightly to feed on the insects of the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area. Madeline Lear and Hector Amezcua The Sacramento Bee

California scientists try to stay ahead of bat-killing disease

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