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  • 'Electrofishing' for predators in the Delta

    California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas.

California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee
California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

Should California’s striped bass be vilified as native-fish killers?

May 06, 2016 06:40 PM

UPDATED May 13, 2016 08:57 AM

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  • Watch hordes of salmon enter Rancho Cordova's Nimbus Fish Hatchery

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