Special education teacher Rachelle Dixson works with 5-year-old patient and student Iker Navarro on a projected whiteboard Friday as fellow patents and students Dulce Aguilar-Solano, 5, at left, and Jacqueline Silva, 6, watch from wheelchairs at a hospital classroom that is part of a joint program between Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California and the Sacramento City Unified School District. The program teaches students in kindergarten through 12th grade on the second floor of the hospital in Sacramento. The Shriners classroom exists to provide regular education for children even during treatment and recovery, and to help them cope with any changes in their physical and mental abilities. In a school setting, that can mean learning to navigate a wheelchair and other assistive technology or interacting with peers.
Special education teacher Rachelle Dixson works with 5-year-old patient and student Iker Navarro on a projected whiteboard Friday as fellow patents and students Dulce Aguilar-Solano, 5, at left, and Jacqueline Silva, 6, watch from wheelchairs at a hospital classroom that is part of a joint program between Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California and the Sacramento City Unified School District. The program teaches students in kindergarten through 12th grade on the second floor of the hospital in Sacramento. The Shriners classroom exists to provide regular education for children even during treatment and recovery, and to help them cope with any changes in their physical and mental abilities. In a school setting, that can mean learning to navigate a wheelchair and other assistive technology or interacting with peers. Manny Crisostomo mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
Special education teacher Rachelle Dixson works with 5-year-old patient and student Iker Navarro on a projected whiteboard Friday as fellow patents and students Dulce Aguilar-Solano, 5, at left, and Jacqueline Silva, 6, watch from wheelchairs at a hospital classroom that is part of a joint program between Shriners Hospitals for Children Northern California and the Sacramento City Unified School District. The program teaches students in kindergarten through 12th grade on the second floor of the hospital in Sacramento. The Shriners classroom exists to provide regular education for children even during treatment and recovery, and to help them cope with any changes in their physical and mental abilities. In a school setting, that can mean learning to navigate a wheelchair and other assistive technology or interacting with peers. Manny Crisostomo mcrisostomo@sacbee.com
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Shriners classroom helps kids be kids during hospital stay

November 25, 2014 8:26 PM

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The Sacramento Bee's team of health reporters covers California health care, medicine and healthy living, with an emphasis on public health and under-served communities.

Sammy Caiola: Health care and healthy living. Reach her at scaiola@sacbee.com or 916-321-1636. Twitter: @SammyCaiola

Claudia Buck: Public health and consumer issues. Reach her at cbuck@sacbee.com or 916-321-1968. Twitter: @Claudia_Buck

Funding for this reporting is paid, in part, by The California Endowment, a private foundation that promotes healthy communities through grants and education. All coverage decisions are made by The Bee.