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  • Watch: NASA captures green aurora that is fitting for St. Patrick's celebration

    The dancing green lights captured by NASA astronaut Jeff Williams during his 2016 mission on the International Space Station provide a spectacular view fitting for the St. Patrick’s Day holiday. NASA, which released the video on Tumblr on Friday, explains auroras. The sun sends toward Earth not only heat and light, but lots of energy and small particles. The protective magnetic field around Earth shields its inhabitants from most of the energy and particles. However, sometimes the particles interact with gases in the atmosphere resulting in beautiful displays of light in the sky. Oxygen gives off green and red light, while nitrogen glows blue and purple.

Watch: NASA captures green aurora that is fitting for St. Patrick's celebration

The dancing green lights captured by NASA astronaut Jeff Williams during his 2016 mission on the International Space Station provide a spectacular view fitting for the St. Patrick’s Day holiday. NASA, which released the video on Tumblr on Friday, explains auroras. The sun sends toward Earth not only heat and light, but lots of energy and small particles. The protective magnetic field around Earth shields its inhabitants from most of the energy and particles. However, sometimes the particles interact with gases in the atmosphere resulting in beautiful displays of light in the sky. Oxygen gives off green and red light, while nitrogen glows blue and purple.
Jeff Williams NASA