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  • Video: Einstein was right - gravitational waves exist

    For the first time ever, scientists have detected gravitational waves - or ripples in space time - using a precise measuring device called LIGO. The discovery supports Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, which predicted the existence of gravitational waves. The detection also marks the first time a Binary Black Hole system was directly observed by scientists.

For the first time ever, scientists have detected gravitational waves - or ripples in space time - using a precise measuring device called LIGO. The discovery supports Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, which predicted the existence of gravitational waves. The detection also marks the first time a Binary Black Hole system was directly observed by scientists. National Science Foundation and LIGO
For the first time ever, scientists have detected gravitational waves - or ripples in space time - using a precise measuring device called LIGO. The discovery supports Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity, which predicted the existence of gravitational waves. The detection also marks the first time a Binary Black Hole system was directly observed by scientists. National Science Foundation and LIGO

Black hole collision confirms another part of Einstein's theory of relativity

June 01, 2017 11:11 AM

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More Videos

Man captures Michigan meteor on camera while driving 0:10

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  • Man captures Michigan meteor on camera while driving

    Mike Austin posted video on YouTube of a meteor sailing through the sky during part of his commute Tuesday night, January 16, 2018. He wrote that he "didn't hear any loud sounds" during his drive on I-75 Northbound between Troy and Bloomfield Hills in Detroit. NWS Detroit later tweeted that it could confirm that "the flash and boom was NOT thunder or lightning, but instead a likely meteor." USGS then confirmed that the meteor caused a magnitude 2.0 earthquake.