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  • Video: NASA animates the powerful winter storm headed for the Mid-Atlantic

    A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. NASA/NOAA GOES Project
A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. NASA/NOAA GOES Project

What we know: Key takeaways on ‘potentially crippling’ storm across East Coast

January 22, 2016 06:28 AM

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  • Man captures Michigan meteor on camera while driving

    Mike Austin posted video on YouTube of a meteor sailing through the sky during part of his commute Tuesday night, January 16, 2018. He wrote that he "didn't hear any loud sounds" during his drive on I-75 Northbound between Troy and Bloomfield Hills in Detroit. NWS Detroit later tweeted that it could confirm that "the flash and boom was NOT thunder or lightning, but instead a likely meteor." USGS then confirmed that the meteor caused a magnitude 2.0 earthquake.