In this August 2017 photo, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore, sits at the Capitol in Sacramento. For four years in a row, Melendez has authored a bill to enshrine whistleblower protections into law for those legislative staff members who come forward with allegations of sexual assault and harassment, only to have the bills killed in the Senate Appropriations Committee.
In this August 2017 photo, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore, sits at the Capitol in Sacramento. For four years in a row, Melendez has authored a bill to enshrine whistleblower protections into law for those legislative staff members who come forward with allegations of sexual assault and harassment, only to have the bills killed in the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rich Pedroncelli AP
In this August 2017 photo, Assemblywoman Melissa Melendez, R-Lake Elsinore, sits at the Capitol in Sacramento. For four years in a row, Melendez has authored a bill to enshrine whistleblower protections into law for those legislative staff members who come forward with allegations of sexual assault and harassment, only to have the bills killed in the Senate Appropriations Committee. Rich Pedroncelli AP
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Blowing the whistle on sexual harassers may get easier for Capitol workers this week

January 29, 2018 05:45 AM

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