In this Aug. 22, 2017 photo, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Deputy Chief of Staff Kirstjen Nielsen speak together as they walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump is expected to nominate Kirstjen Nielsen as his next Secretary of Homeland Security. That’s according to three people familiar with decision. They spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss deliberations before a formal announcement. Nielsen was former DHS Secretary John Kelly’s deputy when he served in that role and moved with Kelly to the White House when he was tapped to be Trump’s chief of staff.
In this Aug. 22, 2017 photo, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Deputy Chief of Staff Kirstjen Nielsen speak together as they walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump is expected to nominate Kirstjen Nielsen as his next Secretary of Homeland Security. That’s according to three people familiar with decision. They spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss deliberations before a formal announcement. Nielsen was former DHS Secretary John Kelly’s deputy when he served in that role and moved with Kelly to the White House when he was tapped to be Trump’s chief of staff. Andrew Harnik AP Photo
In this Aug. 22, 2017 photo, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly and Deputy Chief of Staff Kirstjen Nielsen speak together as they walk across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington. President Donald Trump is expected to nominate Kirstjen Nielsen as his next Secretary of Homeland Security. That’s according to three people familiar with decision. They spoke on condition of anonymity in order to discuss deliberations before a formal announcement. Nielsen was former DHS Secretary John Kelly’s deputy when he served in that role and moved with Kelly to the White House when he was tapped to be Trump’s chief of staff. Andrew Harnik AP Photo

Kelly pushes back against perception of White House chaos

October 12, 2017 5:38 PM

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