Dan Walters

September 9, 2014 4:27 PM

Dan Walters: Brown’s two big legacy projects still face high hurdles

Gov. Jerry Brown’s two big legacy projects, a bullet train and twin water tunnels, face legal, regulatory and financial hurdles that must be cleared for them to proceed. The next few months – a year at the most – may determine their fates.

Dan Walters

Observations on California and its politics

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