This NOAA satellite image taken Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 at 1:00 AM EDT shows a upper level trough over the Southwest. This is producing areas of rain showers and mountain snow showers within that region. Out in front of the tough is a developing surface low pressure over the Central Plains. This is creating a shield of precipitation from Colorado to the Northern Plains. Its associated cold front is producing a well define line of thunderstorms from Texas to the Nebraska. Another disturbed area is in the Pacific northwest where an offshore storm is spreading areas of light rain into the region.
This NOAA satellite image taken Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 at 1:00 AM EDT shows a upper level trough over the Southwest. This is producing areas of rain showers and mountain snow showers within that region. Out in front of the tough is a developing surface low pressure over the Central Plains. This is creating a shield of precipitation from Colorado to the Northern Plains. Its associated cold front is producing a well define line of thunderstorms from Texas to the Nebraska. Another disturbed area is in the Pacific northwest where an offshore storm is spreading areas of light rain into the region. AP
This NOAA satellite image taken Thursday, Nov. 5, 2015 at 1:00 AM EDT shows a upper level trough over the Southwest. This is producing areas of rain showers and mountain snow showers within that region. Out in front of the tough is a developing surface low pressure over the Central Plains. This is creating a shield of precipitation from Colorado to the Northern Plains. Its associated cold front is producing a well define line of thunderstorms from Texas to the Nebraska. Another disturbed area is in the Pacific northwest where an offshore storm is spreading areas of light rain into the region. AP

Crisp temperatures before weekend showers in Sacramento

November 05, 2015 06:57 AM

UPDATED November 05, 2015 07:11 AM

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