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  • Video: NASA animates the powerful winter storm headed for the Mid-Atlantic

    A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.

A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. NASA/NOAA GOES Project
A 21-second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Jan. 19 to 21 shows the movement one frontal system moving across the southern U.S. followed by a second storm system that is expected to bring the powerful winter storm to the Mid-Atlantic. The animation was created by NASA/NOAA's GOES Project at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland. NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Showery weather adding up to moderate amounts of Friday rain

January 22, 2016 07:16 AM

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  • Here's how the next storm will roll in

    Sacramento’s sunny weekend will end with a drizzle, according to the National Weather Service. A weak system is moving into the region Sunday afternoon, January 21, 2018, dropping some light rain on the city overnight and lingering into Monday morning. NWS meteorologist Cory Mueller said to expect less than a quarter inch.