Scientists monitoring radiation in the Pacific Ocean following the 2011 accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant detected cesium-134, a radioactive isotope released during the explosions and meltdowns. It measured 1,000 times below the acceptable limits in drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
Scientists monitoring radiation in the Pacific Ocean following the 2011 accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant detected cesium-134, a radioactive isotope released during the explosions and meltdowns. It measured 1,000 times below the acceptable limits in drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Anonymous Associated Press file
Scientists monitoring radiation in the Pacific Ocean following the 2011 accident at Japan’s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant detected cesium-134, a radioactive isotope released during the explosions and meltdowns. It measured 1,000 times below the acceptable limits in drinking water set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Anonymous Associated Press file

Jane Braxton Little: Northern Exposure

December 06, 2014 03:00 PM

UPDATED December 07, 2014 12:00 AM

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