This Oct. 3, 2013, photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking to faculty at the University of Pennsylvania law school in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court is casting a skeptical eye on voter-approved commissions that draw a state’s congressional district boundaries. The justices heard arguments Monday, March 2, in an appeal from Arizona Republicans who object to the state’s independent redistricting commission that voters created to reduce political influence in the process. Kennedy, whose vote often controls closely fought cases, recounted the run-up to the process that led to the change in the Constitution that provided for direct election of U.S. senators, who previously had been chosen by legislatures.
This Oct. 3, 2013, photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking to faculty at the University of Pennsylvania law school in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court is casting a skeptical eye on voter-approved commissions that draw a state’s congressional district boundaries. The justices heard arguments Monday, March 2, in an appeal from Arizona Republicans who object to the state’s independent redistricting commission that voters created to reduce political influence in the process. Kennedy, whose vote often controls closely fought cases, recounted the run-up to the process that led to the change in the Constitution that provided for direct election of U.S. senators, who previously had been chosen by legislatures. Matt Slocum Associated Press file
This Oct. 3, 2013, photo shows Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy speaking to faculty at the University of Pennsylvania law school in Philadelphia. The Supreme Court is casting a skeptical eye on voter-approved commissions that draw a state’s congressional district boundaries. The justices heard arguments Monday, March 2, in an appeal from Arizona Republicans who object to the state’s independent redistricting commission that voters created to reduce political influence in the process. Kennedy, whose vote often controls closely fought cases, recounted the run-up to the process that led to the change in the Constitution that provided for direct election of U.S. senators, who previously had been chosen by legislatures. Matt Slocum Associated Press file

Supreme Court faces simple question: Will ideology control in Obamacare, Arizona redistricting cases?

March 04, 2015 4:00 PM

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