Sacramento voters recently rejected Measure Y, which would have allocated millions of dollars a year from the taxation of commercial pot farms to pay for youth programs. But a “Measure Y 2.0,” to be weighed by the city’s Budget and Audit Committee in a few weeks, may give the City Council more say over how pot tax revenue is spent.
Sacramento voters recently rejected Measure Y, which would have allocated millions of dollars a year from the taxation of commercial pot farms to pay for youth programs. But a “Measure Y 2.0,” to be weighed by the city’s Budget and Audit Committee in a few weeks, may give the City Council more say over how pot tax revenue is spent. Randall Benton Sacramento Bee file
Sacramento voters recently rejected Measure Y, which would have allocated millions of dollars a year from the taxation of commercial pot farms to pay for youth programs. But a “Measure Y 2.0,” to be weighed by the city’s Budget and Audit Committee in a few weeks, may give the City Council more say over how pot tax revenue is spent. Randall Benton Sacramento Bee file

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