A half-million Sacramento water users nearly lost their main water source last year when Folsom Lake levels dropped near “dead pool” level. Now, water managers say they have devised a plan to reduce the chance that Folsom Lake water will become inaccessible in future droughts.
A half-million Sacramento water users nearly lost their main water source last year when Folsom Lake levels dropped near “dead pool” level. Now, water managers say they have devised a plan to reduce the chance that Folsom Lake water will become inaccessible in future droughts. Randy Pench rpench@sacbee.com
A half-million Sacramento water users nearly lost their main water source last year when Folsom Lake levels dropped near “dead pool” level. Now, water managers say they have devised a plan to reduce the chance that Folsom Lake water will become inaccessible in future droughts. Randy Pench rpench@sacbee.com

LETTERS Water, drought, sales tax

May 04, 2015 05:00 PM

UPDATED May 05, 2015 12:00 AM

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