A logging truck passes a road sign scorched by the flames of the 2013 Rim fire in the Stanislaus National Forest. Chad Hanson, director and principal ecologist with the John Muir Project, says that the logging industry falsely claims that where fires burn most intensely, the forest does not naturally regenerate, suggesting that post-fire logging is needed to generate revenue for artificial tree planting.
A logging truck passes a road sign scorched by the flames of the 2013 Rim fire in the Stanislaus National Forest. Chad Hanson, director and principal ecologist with the John Muir Project, says that the logging industry falsely claims that where fires burn most intensely, the forest does not naturally regenerate, suggesting that post-fire logging is needed to generate revenue for artificial tree planting. Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press file
A logging truck passes a road sign scorched by the flames of the 2013 Rim fire in the Stanislaus National Forest. Chad Hanson, director and principal ecologist with the John Muir Project, says that the logging industry falsely claims that where fires burn most intensely, the forest does not naturally regenerate, suggesting that post-fire logging is needed to generate revenue for artificial tree planting. Rich Pedroncelli Associated Press file

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Another View: Forests recover from fires without clear-cutting

October 22, 2015 5:00 PM

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