A mock-up of the Armatix iP1 pistol, which was intended to be the first “smart gun” for sale in America last year. The company’s handgun uses a radio frequency-enabled stopwatch to identify its user so no one else can fire it, but it has met with the same uproar that has stopped many seeking tougher weapons laws.
A mock-up of the Armatix iP1 pistol, which was intended to be the first “smart gun” for sale in America last year. The company’s handgun uses a radio frequency-enabled stopwatch to identify its user so no one else can fire it, but it has met with the same uproar that has stopped many seeking tougher weapons laws. MONICA ALMEIDA New York Times file
A mock-up of the Armatix iP1 pistol, which was intended to be the first “smart gun” for sale in America last year. The company’s handgun uses a radio frequency-enabled stopwatch to identify its user so no one else can fire it, but it has met with the same uproar that has stopped many seeking tougher weapons laws. MONICA ALMEIDA New York Times file

Dan Morain: Silicon Valley seeks to disrupt gun industry

November 21, 2015 04:00 PM