A vigil at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino in early December honored the shooting victims – 14 killed and 22 injured – during a holiday banquet at the Inland Regional Center. It was the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001. A new statewide Field Poll shows Californians increasingly believe similar bloodshed is very likely to occur here in the near future. One in three of the state’s registered voters think more terrorist attacks are quite probable. By comparison, just 20 percent thought an assault was forthcoming in California following the violence in New York and Washington on 9/11.
A vigil at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino in early December honored the shooting victims – 14 killed and 22 injured – during a holiday banquet at the Inland Regional Center. It was the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001. A new statewide Field Poll shows Californians increasingly believe similar bloodshed is very likely to occur here in the near future. One in three of the state’s registered voters think more terrorist attacks are quite probable. By comparison, just 20 percent thought an assault was forthcoming in California following the violence in New York and Washington on 9/11. Mark J. Terrill The Associated Press
A vigil at San Manuel Stadium in San Bernardino in early December honored the shooting victims – 14 killed and 22 injured – during a holiday banquet at the Inland Regional Center. It was the worst terrorist attack on U.S. soil since Sept. 11, 2001. A new statewide Field Poll shows Californians increasingly believe similar bloodshed is very likely to occur here in the near future. One in three of the state’s registered voters think more terrorist attacks are quite probable. By comparison, just 20 percent thought an assault was forthcoming in California following the violence in New York and Washington on 9/11. Mark J. Terrill The Associated Press

Californians increasingly believe terror attack ‘very likely’ here

January 07, 2016 4:01 PM

Comments

More Videos

  • Construction workers 'are caught up in the housing crunch' too, union leader says

    Robbie Hunter, president of the State Building & Construction Trades Council of California, argues that construction workers need to be paid a wage they can live on.