Big Men in Year Four

10/27/2013 12:00 AM

10/08/2014 10:56 AM

How notable young centers did in their fourth NBA seasons:

DWIGHT HOWARD

6-11, Houston Rockets

Fourth season, 2007-08: 20.7 points, 14.2 rebounds 59.9 percent from field, 59 percent from line; averaged 37.7 minutes and did not miss a game.

BROOK LOPEZ

7-0, Brooklyn Nets

Fourth season, 2011-12: 19.2 points, 3.6 rebounds, 49 percent from field, 62.5 percent from line; only played five games because of injuries.

ROY HIBBERT

7-2, Indiana Pacers

Fourth season, 2011-12: 12.8 points, 8.8 rebounds, 49 percent from field, 71 percent from field; played all 65 games in lockout-shortened season.

JOAKIM NOAH

6-11, Chicago Bulls

Fourth season, 2010-11: 11.7 points, 10.4 rebounds, 52.5 percent from field, 73.9 percent from line; missed 34 games due to injury.

MARC GASOL

7-1, Memphis Grizzlies

Fourth season, 2011-12: 14.6 points, 8.9 rebounds, 4.0 assists, 48.2 percent from field, 74.8 percent from line; played all 65 games in lockout-shortened season.

TYSON CHANDLER

7-1, New York Knicks

Fourth season, 2004-05 (with Chicago Bulls): 8.0 points, 9.7 rebounds 49 percent from field, 67 percent from line; started 10 of 80 games.

AL HORFORD

6-10, Atlanta Hawks

Fourth season, 2010-11: 15.3 points, 9.3 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 55 percent from field, 79.8 percent from line; All-NBA third team.

ANDREW BOGUT

7-0, Golden State Warriors

Fourth season, 2008-09 (Milwaukee Bucks): 11.7 points, 10.3 rebounds, 57 percent from field, 57 percent from line; missed 46 games due to injury.

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