Cody Meyer holds his potential world record spotted bass he caught Friday at New Bullards Bar Reservoir in Yuba County. The fish weighed in at 10.80 pounds.
Cody Meyer holds his potential world record spotted bass he caught Friday at New Bullards Bar Reservoir in Yuba County. The fish weighed in at 10.80 pounds. Courtesy of Tim Little
Cody Meyer holds his potential world record spotted bass he caught Friday at New Bullards Bar Reservoir in Yuba County. The fish weighed in at 10.80 pounds. Courtesy of Tim Little

California pro catches whopper spotted bass that may break world record

December 18, 2016 04:50 PM

UPDATED January 05, 2017 11:34 AM

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