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  • 'Electrofishing' for predators in the Delta

    California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas.

California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee
California officials are using electric cables to stun non-native predatory fish in the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, including striped bass, to see it raises survival rates for juvenile salmon and steelhead. The zapped fish are then relocated to less sensitive areas. Ryan Sabalow The Sacramento Bee

Higher flows bring shad fishing boom in American River

May 23, 2016 12:52 PM

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