Dr. Bennet Omalu, left, who cuts open dead people for a living, has distinguished himself in the medical arts through his detailed examination of brains. It was in this practice that his life intersected with the death of Pro Football Hall of Fame center Mike Webster of the Pittsburgh Steelers.
Dr. Bennet Omalu, left, who cuts open dead people for a living, has distinguished himself in the medical arts through his detailed examination of brains. It was in this practice that his life intersected with the death of Pro Football Hall of Fame center Mike Webster of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Paul Sancya The Associated Press
Dr. Bennet Omalu, left, who cuts open dead people for a living, has distinguished himself in the medical arts through his detailed examination of brains. It was in this practice that his life intersected with the death of Pro Football Hall of Fame center Mike Webster of the Pittsburgh Steelers. Paul Sancya The Associated Press
Andy Furillo

Andy Furillo

Offering insight into the artistry of the sports world

Andy Furillo

Opinion: ‘We are culprits, too,’ says doctor who documented brain damage in NFL players

May 22, 2015 4:55 PM

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Andy Furillo has been a reporter with The Sacramento Bee since 1991. He covered mostly crime and punishment until April 2015, when he began writing a sports column. He believes art inspires in many forms: a Jerry Garcia guitar solo, Van Gogh's "Starry Night," and Madison Bumgarner's five innings of masterpiece relief in Game 7 of the 2014 World Series. Sport is art, and sport is fun, and it is filled with interesting people. Furillo hopes to bring out the best of it all. Contact Andy Furillo at afurillo@sacbee.com or 916-321-1141. Twitter: @andyfurillo