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September 17, 2008
Mexico's Independence Day celebrations

Compelling images are coming out of Mexico from the Independence Day celebrations. On Monday, in Morelia, Mexico, assailants threw two grenades into a huge crowd of revelers, killing at least seven and injuring more than 100. The attack targeted a cherished tradition that brings millions of Mexicans together in public plazas each year, and cast an immediate pall over Tuesday's parades, held in cities and towns across the nation to celebrate the 1810 start of Mexico's 10-year war of independence from Spain, the Associated Press reported. (15 images)


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Residents pray and light candles on the site where a grenade explosion killed at least seven people and injured more than 100 in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008. Two grenades exploded simultaneously, only blocks apart, in Morelia's historic center, allegedly thrown by suspected drug cartel members into a crowd of thousands of Independence Day revelers, in a terrorist attack that seriously ramps up Mexico's drug war.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Residents pray candles on the site where a grenade explosion killed at least seven people and injured more than 100 in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Relatives and friends of Alfredo Sanchez attend his funeral service in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Soldiers stand near the site where fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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A military guards an area of downtown Morelia, in western Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Military patrol  the area where fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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A man walks by a Mexican soldier in guard near the site where two fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008. AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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A military guards the area where fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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A shoe sits in the area where fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, western Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.   AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Clothes and shoes sit in the area where fragmentation grenades exploded late Monday in Morelia, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008. AP / Eduardo Verdugo

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Injured people lie on the ground awaiting for help after two explosions during an Independence Day celebration in Morelia, Mexico, Monday, Sept. 15, 2008. The explosions went off in the main square of Morelia as the crowds celebrated the beginning of the traditional reenactment of Mexico's cry for independence, known as El Grito, or The Shout. According to news reports, at least three people died and 20 were injured during the explosions. AP / Agencia Quadratin

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Fireworks explode over the Metropolitan Cathedral during  the traditional "El grito," or the shout, to kick off Independence Day celebrations in the Zocalo in Mexico City, late Monday, Sept. 15, 2008. Mexico celebrates Independence Day on Sept. 16 which marks the anniversary of the beginning of Mexico's War of Independence with Spain (1810-1821).  AP / Gregory Bull

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Mexican President Felipe Calderon, center, rides on a military vehicle beside his Secretary of Defense, Gen.  Guillermo Galvan Galvan, left, and his Secretary of the Navy, Adm. Mariano Francisco Saynez Mendoza at the start of the traditional Independence Day military parade in Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Alexandre Meneghini

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Mexican Army elite troops shout military slogans during the Independence Day military parade in Mexico City, Tuesday, Sept. 16, 2008.  AP / Alexandre Meneghini

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Mexico's President Felipe Calderon gives the traditional "El grito," or the shout, to kick off Independence Day celebrations in the Zocalo in Mexico City, late Monday, Sept. 15, 2008.   AP / Gregory Bull



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