A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
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December 16, 2008
Holiday mail
Monday was the busiest day of the year for the U.S. Postal Service which expected to process and mail over one billion cards, letters and packages. Throughout the holiday season, people send cards and packages to family and friends. Children write and mail letters to Santa Claus. And, at the Western Wall in Jerusalem's Old City, Rabbis and postal officials place letters written and addressed to God into cracks in the wall, Judaism's holiest site. (15 images)

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Susan Sokolowski pushes a cart with her son Lon and Christmas gifts at the U.S. Post Office in Kirkland, Wash. on Wednesday, Dec. 10, 2008. The family, who was trying to beat the holiday shipping rush, was shipping presents to family and friends in Oklahoma, Virginia and Connecticut. Seattle Post-Intelligencer / Joshua Trujillo


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U.S.Postal worker Deborah Miller throws packages of magazines onto a conveyor belt at the U.S. Post Office sort center Dec. 15, in San Francisco, Calif. On its busiest day of the year, the U.S. Postal Service is expecting to process and mail over one billion cards, letters and packages. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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U.S.Postal worker Tin Aung moves boxes of letters and cards at the U.S. Post Office sort center Dec. 15, 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. On its busiest day of the year, the U.S. Postal Service is expecting to process and mail over one billion cards, letters and packages. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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Stacks of boxes holding cards and letters are seen at the U.S. Post Office sort center Dec. 15, 2008 in San Francisco, Calif. Getty Images / Justin Sullivan



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From the left, Sam Alosi, 5, and his sister, Emma Alosi, 7, both from Walpole, Mass., mail a letter to Santa Claus at Macy's on Nov. 28 in New York City. Getty Images / Yana Paskova



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''Santa's helpers'' at the U.S. Post Office's South Postal Annex in Boston spend their breaks sorting and responding to letters to Santa Claus, like these as seen on Dec. 3. Parents of a growing number of needy families are writing desperate letters to Secret Santa, a Boston charity. The Boston Globe / Michele McDonald



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Jane Berg, left, and Linda Swift read letters at the main post office, Dec. 3, 2008, in Chicago, Ill. Postal workers sort out thousands of letters to Santa Claus. Many of the letters from children and adults, reflect the worsening economy as they seek help with the rent, utility bill payments. Chicago Tribune / Chuck Berman



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Laura Yeomans of Nampa, Idaho, waits in line at the Nampa post office to mail her Christmas package to friends and family on Monday, Dec. 15. Idaho Press-Tribune / Mike Vogt



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FedEx workers unload packages from shipping containers as they are sorted and placed on trucks to be delivered Dec. 2, in Miami, Fla. Getty Images / Joe Raedle



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Postal carrier Anna Tempesta delivers mail as snow falls across the city, Tuesday Dec. 9, in Racine, Wis. Journal Times / Mark Hertzberg



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An employee dressed as Santa Claus watches two employees of French postal services La Poste answering children letters on Dec. 03, in Libourne's post office, near Bordeaux, southwestern France. Since 1962, this special unit of La Poste is bound to find the destination of letters with unreadable addresses from more than 130 countries. 60 people are employed between Nov. 20, and early January 2009 to answer children's letters. Last year, the center received 1,430,000 letters and 181,200 from the Internet. AFP / Getty Images / Jean-Pierre Muller



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A customer posts letters into the overflowing post box outside the historic Lacock Village Stores and Post Office on Dec. 15, in Lacock, United Kingdom. Post Offices across the UK are bracing themselves for what is widely expected to be their busiest day of the year with the Royal Mail predicting the posting of 150 million items, which is nearly double the usual daily volume of mail. Getty Images / Matt Cardy



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Western Wall Rabbi Shmuel Rabinowitz, right, places letters written and addressed to God into cracks in the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, in Jerusalem's Old City, Tuesday, Dec. 9. An Israeli rabbi and postal official have delivered hundreds of letters from across the world to their destination, the Western Wall in Jerusalem. Every year Israeli officials bring letters addressed to the wall or to God and stuff them into the cracks between the stones in the wall. AP / Bernat Armangue



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Letters from around the world addressed to God are seen piled up just before being delivered to the Western Wall, at an Israel Postal Company facility in Jerusalem, Tuesday, Dec. 9. AP / Bernat Armangue



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Israel Postal Company employees hold letters written and addressed to God as they place them into cracks in the Western Wall, Judaism's holiest site, in Jerusalem's Old City, Tuesday, Dec. 9. AP / Bernat Armangue



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