A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
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February 2, 2009
Chronicling the economic downturn
Today we feature the images of Getty Images photographer John Moore, who's been chronicling the nation's economic downturn, from a family's eviction in Colorado to the devastation one Ohio town endured after the loss of a shipping company. (21 images)

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Adams County Sheriff's deputy C.J. Wild supervises an eviction from an apartment Jan. 27, in Thornton, Colorado. The renter, an electrician, was laid off 6 weeks before from his job as an electrician. Wild and fellow county deputies supervise court-ordered evictions daily, as renters fall behind in their monthly payments and home owners lose their houses to foreclosure. Getty Images / John Moore

 

 



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Adams County Sheriff's deputy C.J. Wild, left, supervises as furniture is carried out during an eviction Jan. 27, in Thornton, Colo. Wild and fellow county deputies supervise court-ordered evictions daily, as renters fall behind in their monthly payments and homeowners lose their houses to foreclosures. Getty Images / John Moore



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Adams County Sheriff's deputy C.J. Wild, left, supervises as furniture is carried out during an eviction Jan. 27, in Thornton, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Animal Control officer Leslie Feeney carries out an abandoned pet during an eviction Jan. 27, in Thornton, Colo. Abandoned animals taken by authorities during evictions are kept at the county shelter for five days before being put up for adoption. Getty Images / John Moore



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Adams County Sheriff's deputy C.J. Wild, left, and an apartment manager pack up bathroom items while carrying out an eviction Jan. 27, in Thornton, Colo.. Wild and fellow Adams County, Colo. deputies supervise court-ordered evictions daily, as renters fall behind in their monthly payments and homeowners lose their houses to foreclosures. Getty Images / John Moore



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Mary Ann Smith watches as an eviction team removes furniture from her foreclosed house Feb. 2, in Adams County, Colo. She said she and her husband had been renting from an owner, who collected the monthly payments but had stopped paying his mortgage. The bank foreclosed on the property and called the Adams County sheriff's department to supervise the eviction. The Smiths managed to borrow enough money to rent another house for themselves and their four children, she said, but not in time to avoid eviction. Getty Images / John Moore



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Mary Ann Smith looks over an album of familiy photos after an eviction team removed all of her possessions from her foreclosed house on Feb. 2, in Adams County, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Adams Country sheriff's deputy Greg Barnett, center, looks on after an eviction team carried out a family's belongings during a foreclosure eviction Feb. 2, in Adams County, Colo. The family had been renting from an owner, who collected the monthly payments but had stopped paying his mortgage, according to renter Mary Ann Smith. Getty Images / John Moore



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Adams Country sheriff's deputy Greg Barnett, right, supervises as an eviction team carries out a family's belongings during a foreclosure eviction Feb. 2, in Adams County, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Farmers talk around the lunch table Jan. 31, on the outskirts of Wilmington, Ohio. The German air shipping company DHL closed down its U.S. domestic shipping service and thousands of job losses in its Wilmington hub are devastating the local economy. The layoffs have had a ripple effect on other business, affecting people in many areas not directly linked to DHL. Getty Images / John Moore



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A road sign for a new bypass highway is pasted over with a closed sign after construction was halted on the new roadway Jan. 31, on the outskirts of Wilmington, Ohio. When the German air shipping company DHL announced it was closing down its U.S. domestic shipping service, many public works projects in the area were abruptly halted. The DHL closure and the thousands of resulting layoffs are having a huge ripple effect are affecting the local tax base which helps finace local roadworks, schools and hospitals. Getty Images / John Moore



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A woman walks across railroad tracks Jan. 31, in Wilmington, Ohio. Thousands of layoffs from the German air shipping company DHL, combined with the national economic recession, have made for a difficult winter in Wilmington and the surrounding areas. Getty Images / John Moore



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A package shipping truck for UPS drives through the streets Jan. 31, of Wilmington, Ohio. UPS was involved in negotiations with German air shipper DHL in a bid to take over DHL's failing domestic U.S. operations. Thousands of layoffs by DHL, combined with the national economic recession, have made for a difficult winter in Wilmington and the surrounding areas. Getty Images / John Moore



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Mark Woods leans over his work while repairing a kitchen for a disadvantaged family Jan. 31, in Wilmington, Ohio. Local residents have been working to help their neighbors as the local economy has tanked. Thousands of layoffs by DHL, combined with the national economic recession, have made for a difficult winter in Wilmington and the surrounding areas. Getty Images / John Moore



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Lesley Bennett chooses donated clothes for her four children at the Sugartree Ministries soup kitchen on Jan. 31, in Wilmington, Ohio. Bennett was laid off from her job last summer. Wilmington and surrounding communities are suffering from skyrocketing unemployment as thousands of job losses as German air shipper DHL shuts down its domestic U.S. operations, based in Wilmington. Getty Images / John Moore



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People receive donated bread at the Sugartree Ministries soup kitchen on Jan. 31, in Wilmington, Ohio. Getty Images / John Moore



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Lesley Bennett eats with her four children at the Sugartree Ministries soup kitchen on Jan. 31, in Wilmington, Ohio. Bennett was laid off from her job last summer. Getty Images / John Moore



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A family arrives to attend a job fair on Jan. 29, in Wilmington, Ohio. Wilmington and surrounding communities are suffering from skyrocketing unemployment as thousands of job losses as German air shipper DHL shuts down its domestic U.S. operations, based in Wilmington. According to reports, continuing claims for employment rose to over 4.7 million people as of Jan. 17, the highest since records have been kept. Getty Images / John Moore



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Unemployed worker Phillip Elam visits a booth at a job fair on Jan. 29, in Wilmington, Ohio. Wilmington and surrounding communities are suffering from thousands of job losses as German air shipper DHL shuts down its domestic U.S. operations, based in Wilmington. Elam had been a forklift driver for DHL subsidiary ABX before he was laid off three months ago. Getty Images / John Moore



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Anthony Edgington, right, fills in an employment application at a job fair on Jan. 29, in Wilmington, Ohio. Wilmington and surrounding communities are suffering from thousands of job losses as German air shipper DHL shuts down its domestic U.S. operations, based in Wilmington. Edgington said that he has been out of work since last June. Getty Images / John Moore



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Alix South, age 6, sits next her her father, Vince South, an unemployed manufacturing worker, as he registers at a job fair on Jan. 29, in Wilmington, Ohio. Wilmington and surrounding communities are suffering from thousands of job losses as German air shipper DHL shuts down its domestic U.S. operations, based in Wilmington. South, a father of two, was laid off from his job 6 months before. aGetty Images / John Moore



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