A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
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March 4, 2009
Colorado's renewable energy
Colorado's renewable energy promise was on the national stage in Denver on Tuesday, Feb. 17, when President Barack Obama praised the state as a leader in clean energy that will deliver on its potential. The praise came as no surprise to the estimated 250 renewable energy business leaders who watched Obama sign the $787 billion economic stimulus package at the Denver Museum of Nature & Science -- a location meant to emphasize the importance of a new energy economy. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which is America's chief research and development center for renewable energy, is expecting increased funding as part of the Obama administration's emphasis on "green" energy. A division of the Department of Energy, the NREL focuses on testing and improving wind, solar and biofuel technologies, which are then commercially developed by the private sector. Getty Images photographer John Moore documented work at the laboratory and at a neighboring business, Namaste Solar, this week. (15 images)

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A wind turbine turns as giant turbine blades lie awaiting new construction at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) wind technology center March 3, on the outskirts of Boulder, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore


 

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Master research technician Ed Overly prepares a wind turbine gearbox for testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) wind technology center March 3, on the outskirts of Boulder, Colo. The NREL, which is America's chief research and development center for renewable energy, is expecting increased funding as part of the Obama administration's emphasis on "green" energy. A division of the Department of Energy, the NREL focuses on testing and improving wind, solar and biofuel technologies, which are then commercially developed by the private sector. Getty Images / John Moore



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Mechanical engineer Darren Rahn tours the wind turbine testing center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) wind technology center March 3, on the outskirts of Boulder, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Mechanical engineer Darren Rahn tours the wind turbine testing center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) wind technology center March 3, on the outskirts of Boulder, Colo. The NREL, which is America's chief research and development center for renewable energy, is expecting increased funding as part of the Obama administration's emphasis on "green" energy. A division of the Department of Energy, the NREL focuses on testing and improving wind, solar and biofuel technologies, which are then commercially developed by the private sector. Getty Images / John Moore



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Engineer Steve Robbins displays a sheet of "thin film" solar cells at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colorado. Thin film solar panels, at relatively low cost and highly adaptable because of their flexibility, have quickly come to dominate the U.S. market in the last two years. Getty Images / John Moore



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Engineer Steve Robbins walks past machinery testing solar cells at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Solar panels attached to roof shingles create energy while being tested at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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"Concentrators" magnify sunlight onto solar cells during testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Wade Andrews, an installer for Namaste Solar, carries a solar panel on the roof of a residence on March 4, in Boulder, Colo. Renewable energy companies such as Namaste expect to benefit from additional funding for green intiatives included in the recently passed federal economic stimulus package. Blake Jones, CEO of the Boulder-based, employee-owned Namaste, introduced President Barack Obama when he visited Denver to sign the economic stimulus bill in February. Getty Images / John Moore



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Installers for Namaste Solar connect solar panels to the roof of a home on March 4, in Boulder, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Lead installer Gary Gantzer with Namaste Solar prepares to connect a solar electrical panel to the roof of a home on March 4, in Boulder, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Installers for Namaste Solar connect solar panels to the roof of a home on March 4, in Boulder, Colo. Renewable energy companies such as Namaste expect to benefit from additional funding for green intiatives included in the recently passed federal economic stimulus package. Getty Images / John Moore



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Heather Lammers plugs in a Toyota Prius Hybrid, which was being recharged by a solar energy panel at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Research scientist Deborah Hyman carries some testing samples in the biofuel testing department of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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Principal engineer Jim McMillan walks through the biofuels testing center at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) March 3, in Golden, Colo. Getty Images / John Moore



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