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Mount Redoubt has shifted into a different pattern, emitting a more steady ash plume rather than the violent explosions of the past week, scientists said Monday. Federal and state officials also have established a unified command to address the volcano's impact on an oil storage facility holding more than 6 million gallons of oil. The volcano 100 miles southwest of Anchorage has erupted 18 times since March 22, sending ash in various directions. A light dusting of ash fell for the first time on Anchorage on Saturday. But since then, the volcano has entered a new phase, according to monitors at the Alaska Volcano Observatory. (16 images)

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This black and white satellite image provided by DigitalGlobe and taken Monday March 30, 2009 shows Alaska's Mount Redoubt volcano as it emits a steady ash plume. The volcano 100 miles southwest of Anchorage has erupted 18 times since March 22, sending ash in various directions. A light dusting of ash fell for the first time on Anchorage on Saturday. AP / DigitalGlobe


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In this handout image provided by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the United States Geological Survey (AVO/ USGS), parts of the Drift River Valley flood and is covered with tephra deposits (ash) from the eruption of the Mount Redoubt volcano on March 23, 2009 in Mount Redoubt, approximately 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. According to geologists, the north flank of Mount Redoubt, a 10,197-foot volcano in the Chigmit Mountains has erupted six times since late Sunday March 22, 2009, with the largest eruption sending a plume of smoke some 50,000 feet above sea level. It's been nearly 20 years since Redoubt has had any activity and is now forcing people in the surrounding area to stock up on protective masks in preparation of ash clouds from the eruption. Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey / Cyrus Read



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In this photo released by the Alaska Volcano Observatory/ U.S. Geological Survey, steam rises from the top vent in the summit crater of Alaska's Mount Redoubt, Saturday March 21, 2009. The Mount Redoubt volcano erupted five times Sunday night and early Monday morning, March 22 and 23, 2009, sending an ash plume more than 9 miles into the air in the volcano's first emissions in nearly 20 years. Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey / Cyrus Read



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An ash cloud from the eruption of Redoubt volcano rises above the horizon in Homer, Alaska, Thursday, March 26, 2009. The eruption Thursday morning sent an ash cloud 65,000 feet above sea level, the Alaska Volcano Observatory reported. AP / Kenai Peninsula Clarion / McKibben Jackinsky



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Mount Redoubt is seen from Kenai, Alaska Thursday, March 26, 2009. The volcano erupted Thursday morning sending ash clouds an estimated 65,000 feet into the air and is expected to effect the towns of Kenai and Homer. AP / Al Grillo



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This photo released by the Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey shows massive flooding in Drift Valley from the eruption of Mount Redoubt volcano on the west side of Cook Inlet on Monday, March 23, 2009, across the inlet from Kenai, Alaska. The volcano has been erupting since Sunday night March 22, 2009, sending an ash cloud an estimated 50,000 feet into the air. The ash cloud is heading toward the Susitna Valley, affecting towns including Talkeetna, and Trappers Creek about 100 miles north of Anchorage. Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey / Game McGimsey



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This photo provided by the Alaska Volcano Observatory shows Redoubt Volcano as seen from between Kenai and Nilnilchik, Alaska erupting at 3:29 pm, Alaska time March 28, 2009. The volcano about 100 miles southwest of Anchorage first erupted Sunday night with the most resent eruption Saturday evening. Alaska Volcano Observatory / Jaden Larson



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Mount Redoubt bellows steam and ash across the Cook Inlet from Ninilchik, Alaska, Thursday, March 26, 2009. Ash from the volcano is seen on the snow. The volcano on the west side of Cook Inlet erupted Thursday morning sending ash clouds an estimated 65,000 feet into the air dusting the towns on the Kenai Peninsula including the towns of Kenai, Ninilchik and Homer.  AP / Al Grillo



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People watch as Mount Redoubt bellows steam as seen from Kenai, Alaska Thursday, March 26, 2009. The volcano on the west side of Cook Inlet erupted Thursday morning sending ash clouds an estimated 65,000 feet into the air and is expected to affect the towns of Kenai and Homer. AP / Al Grillo



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In this handout image provided by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the United States Geological Survey (AVO/ USGS), the top vent in the Mount Redoubt volcano summit crater emits ash and steam on March 21, 2009 in Mount Redoubt, approximately 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. According to geologists, the north flank of Mount Redoubt, a 10,197-foot volcano in the Chigmit Mountains has erupted three times late Sunday March 22, 2009 and early Monday, with the largest eruption sending a plume of smoke some 50,000 feet above sea level.  Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey / Cyrus Read



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Ben Tesfu brings shopping carts in from the parking lot at the Carrs Safeway Aurora Village store while wearing a protective mask as ash from Mount Redoubt volcano falls on Sunday, March 29, 2009, in Anchorage, Alaska. MCT / Anchorage Daily News / Bob Hallinen



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Field maintenance crews at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport used snow to help absorb and remove volcanic ash from Mount Redoubt on Sunday, March 29, 2009, in Anchorage, Alaska. MCT / Anchorage Daily News / Bill Roth



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In this handout image provided by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the United States Geological Survey (AVO/ USGS), the Drift River Valley floods and is covered with tephra deposits (ash) from the eruption of the Mount Redoubt volcano on March 23, 2009 in Mount Redoubt, approximately 100 miles southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. According to geologists, the north flank of Mount Redoubt, a 10,197-foot volcano in the Chigmit Mountains has erupted six times since late Sunday March 22, 2009, with the largest eruption sending a plume of smoke some 50,000 feet above sea level. It's been nearly 20 years since Redoubt has had any activity and is now forcing people in the surrounding area to stock up on protective masks in preparation of ash clouds from the eruption.  Alaska Volcano Observatory / U.S. Geological Survey / Cyrus Read



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Mount Redoubt bellows steam and ash across the Cook Inlet from Ninilchik, Alaska, Thursday, March 26, 2009. Ash from the volcano is seen on the snow. The volcano on the west side of Cook Inlet erupted Thursday morning sending ash clouds an estimated 65,000 feet (nearly 20 kms) into the air dusting the towns on the Kenai Peninsula including the towns of Kenai, Ninilchik and Homer. AP / Al Grillo



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Volcanic ash from Mount Redoubt and winter road grime cloud the air, March 31, 2009 as traffic moves along Tudor Road in Anchorage, Alaska. MCT / Anchorage Daily News / Bill Roth



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Terry Lamberson searches for her luggage at Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport in Alaska on March 31, 2009, amongst hundreds of bags being held after airline flights were disrupted or canceled during the Mount Redoubt eruptions over the last several days. MCT / Anchorage Daily News / Bill Roth



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