A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
May 15, 2009
Repair mission to the Hubble Space Telescope
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- Atlantis' astronauts headed out for another spacewalk Friday, this time to give the Hubble Space Telescope some new, badly needed gyroscopes and batteries. Replacing Hubble's gyroscopes is the top priority for this final repair mission to the 19-year-old observatory. The gyroscopes are part of the telescope pointing system, and half of the old ones are broken. It was the second spacewalk in as many days for the Atlantis astronauts. On Thursday, another two-man team installed a powerful new camera and a computer data unit, after struggling with a stubborn bolt. NASA hoped for an easier, less stressful spacewalk Friday. In all, five spacewalks are planned so that the observatory -- beloved by astronomers and many others for its breathtaking views of the universe -- is at its apex while living out its remaining years. (16 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

Astronauts John Grunsfeld, left, and Andew Feustel working on the Hubble Space Telescope during the first of five STS-125 spacewalks on Thursday, May 14. NASA


atlantis15_02.jpg
Astronaut John Grunsfeld performs a spacewalk on Thursday, May 14, to work on the Hubble Space Telescope. The reflection in his helmet visor shows astronaut Andrew Feustel taking the photo while perched on the end of the remote manipulator system arm. NASA



atlantis15_03.jpg
This image provided by NASA shows a high oblique scene looking toward the Red Sea, Sinai Peninsula and the Mediterranean Sea. Saudi Arabia is in the foreground and Egypt's Nile River and its delta can be seen (left) toward the horizon. Israel and Jordan can be seen near the top edge of the frame. The Gulf of Suez and the Gulf of Aqaba (near frame center) extend from the Red Sea, bottom, toward the Mediterranean Sea. The image is among the first group of still images downlinked Tuesday May 12, by the crewmembers onboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis enroute to the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA



atlantis15_04.jpg
This image taken from the ground using a telescope with a solar filter shows the NASA space shuttle Atlantis in silhouette during solar transit, Tuesday, May 12, from Florida. This image was made before Atlantis and the crew of STS-125 had grappled the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA / Thierry Legault



atlantis15_05.jpg
Astronaut John Grunsfeld performs a spacewalk to work on the Hubble Space Telescope on Thursday, May 14. NASA



atlantis15_06.jpg
Astronaut Andrew Feustel, mission specialist, performs work on the Hubble Space Telescope as the first of five STS-125 spacewalks kicks off a week's work on the orbiting observatory. Feustel, teamed with astronaut John Grunsfeld, arm is visible at bottom frame, will join the veteran spacewalker on two of the remaining four sessions of extravehicular activity later in the mission. NASA



atlantis15_07.jpg
Astronaut Andrew Feustel, mission specialist, performs work on the Hubble Space Telescope as the first of five STS-125 spacewalks kicks off a week's work on the orbiting observatory. The shuttle is perched on the end of the Canadian-built remote manipulator system. Feustel, teamed with astronaut John Grunsfeld, not pictured, will join the veteran spacewalker on two of the remaining four sessions of extravehicular activity later in the mission. NASA



atlantis15_08.jpg
STS-125 mission specialist Michael Good is busy on Atlantis' middeck during his second day in space, May 13,. The mission promises to be very busy for the entire crew, as five spacewalks, two of which will have Good leaving the shirt-sleeved environment of the shuttle to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope, are in the offing. Fellow astronaut Mike Massimino is in the foreground. NASA



atlantis15_09.jpg
The Hubble Space Telescope in the cargo bay of the Space Shuttle Atlantis following its capture and lock-down in Earth orbit Wedneseday, May 13. NASA



atlantis15_10.jpg
The Hubble Space Telescope as seen from the Space Shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft approached each other in Earth's orbit Wednesday, May 13. NASA



atlantis15_11.jpg
The Hubble Space Telescope following the grapple of the observatory by the shuttle's remote manipulator system Wednesday, May 13. NASA



atlantis15_12.jpg
The Hubble Space Telescope following the grapple of the observatory by the shuttle's remote manipulator system Wednesday, May 13. NASA



atlantis15_13.jpg
The Hubble Space Telescope following the grapple of the observatory by the shuttle's remote manipulator system Wednesday, May 13. NASA



atlantis15_14.jpg
The space shuttle Atlantis lifts off May 11, at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on the final shuttle mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. At right on Pad 39A sits shuttle Endeavour which would be launched as a rescue mission in the event the Atlantis is damaged on launch. AFP / Getty Images / Stan Honda



atlantis15_15.jpg
The media photographs the space shuttle Atlantis as it lifts off May 11, at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on the final shuttle mission to service NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. AFP / Getty Images / Stan Honda



atlantis15_16.jpg
Ryan Eddleman, alongside with hundreds of other people, waits to watch the space shuttle launch, near Veterans Park in Titusville, Fla. Monday, May 11, on a mission to repair the Hubble telescope. AP / J Pat Carter



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments
blog comments powered by Disqus