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May 18, 2009
The final human touch to Hubble
CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (AP) -- Spacewalking astronauts ventured out Monday to finish repairs on the Hubble Space Telescope, which will never be touched by human hands again. It was the fifth and final spacewalk for the crew of shuttle Atlantis, and the fifth and final visit by astronauts, ever, to Hubble. (16 images)

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Astronaut Michael Good rides Atlantis' remote manipulator system arm to continue work on the Hubble Space Telescope on Sunday, May 17. NASA


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Astronaut Andrew Feustel, perched alone on the end of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' remote manipulator system arm, participates in the first of five STS-125 spacewalks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope. The space shuttle Atlantis' mission is to overhaul the Hubble Space Telescope in order to extend its working life. NASA



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The Hubble Space Telescope is grappled to Space Shuttle Atlantis STS-125 by the shuttle's Canadian-built remote manipulator system. NASA



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Astronauts John Grunsfeld (bottom) and Andrew Feustel, perched on the end of the Space Shuttle Atlantis' remote manipulator system, perform the first of five STS-125 spacewalks to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope May 14, in Space. . NASA



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Astronaut Mike Massimino works with the Hubble Space Telescope in the cargo bay of the Earth-orbiting space shuttle Atlantis, Friday, May 15. Astronaut Massimino and Michael Good, not shown, participated in the second session of STS-125 extravehicular activity, as part of a five-day beehive-like agenda of space walking and work on the giant orbital observatory. NASA



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Astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-125 mission specialist, retrieves a power tool as he navigates near the Hubble Space Telescope on the end of the remote manipulator system arm, controlled from inside Atlantis' crew cabin, Saturday, May 16. Astronauts Feustel and John Grunsfeld were continuing servicing work on the giant observatory, locked down in the cargo bay of the shuttle. NASA



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Astronauts Andrew Feustel and John Grunsfeld (partially obscured at bottom), both STS-125 mission specialists, participate in the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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Astronaut John Grunsfeld, STS-125 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA



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In this handout from NASA, Astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-125 mission specialist, retrieves a power tool as he navigates near the Hubble Space Telescope on the end of the remote manipulator system arm, controlled from inside Atlantis' crew cabin on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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STS-125 mission specialists Andrew Feustel, left, and John Grunsfeld taking part in the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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Astronaut John Grunsfeld, STS-125 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA). NASA



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Astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-125 mission specialist, positioned on a foot restraint on the end of Atlantis' remote manipulator system (RMS), participates in the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as work continues to refurbish and upgrade the Hubble Space Telescope on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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With the Hubble Space Telescope in the background, astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-125 mission specialist, is seen here working during the mission's third extravehicular activity (EVA). NASA



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Astronaut Andrew Feustel, STS-125 mission specialist, positioned on a foot restraint on the end of Atlantis' remote manipulator system (RMS), moves the Corrective Optics Space Telescope Axial Replacement (COSTAR) during the mission's third session of extravehicular activity (EVA) on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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Astronaut Michael Good, STS-125 mission specialist, peers through a window toward Atlantis' crew cabin interior, during the flight's second of five sessions of extravehicular activity to perform work on the Hubble Space Telescope on Friday, May 15. NASA



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A nadir view of cloud vortices in the area of the Canary Islands in the North Atlantic Ocean was recorded by one of the STS-125 crewmembers on a busy flight day six on Saturday, May 16. NASA



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