A photo blog of world events by Sacbee.com Assistant Director of Multimedia Tim Reese.
Subscribe to feed Subscribe to this blog's feed
November 30, 2009
Bhopal 25 years later
BHOPAL, India (AP) -- The Bhopal industrial disaster killed about 4,000 people in the early hours of Dec. 3, 1984. A few days later the death toll had doubled. Over the next few years, the lingering affects of the poison nearly doubled the toll again, to about 15,000, according to government estimates. Local activists say the real numbers are almost twice that. A quarter-century later, thousands like are still grappling with the affects of exposure to the deadly gas as it winds its way through generations not even born when the disaster struck. Rights groups say toxic waste from the plant still contaminates the soil and groundwater in nearby neighborhoods. (23 images)

Follow The Frame on Twitter at sacbee_theframe

Shyam Babu, 10, looks on as he plays outside his home near the Union Carbide factory on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Shyam suffers from cerebral palsy believed to be from water contamination. Twenty-five years after an explosion causing a mass gas leak, in the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, killed at least eight thousand people, toxic material from the biggest industrial disaster in history continues to affect Bhopalis. A new generation is growing up sick, disabled and struggling for justice. The effects of the disaster on the health of generations to come, both through genetics, transferred from gas victims to their children and through the ongoing severe contamination, caused by the Union Carbide factory, has only started to develop visible forms recently. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak


bhopal02.jpg
Ground water, believed to be contaminated, is seen near the Union Carbide factory on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal03.jpg
Children are reflected in ground water, believed to be contaminated, near the site of the deserted Union Carbide factory on Nov. 28, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal04.jpg
Fifteen-year-old Sachin Kumar washes himself at his home located in a slum near the site of the deserted Union Carbide factory on November 30, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Sachin had been receiving physical therapy treatment and education from the Chingari Trust rehabilitation Centre for victims of the 1984 gas tragedy, for which he has been registered for. However, Sachin's health has turned for the worse and his legs, now covered with open sores, restrict him from travelling to the major road where the Chingari Trust bus can pick him up for daily treatment. The oldest of four, Sachin spends his days playing board games with his friends and a rare game of cricket, which he sees as the fulfillment of his dreams of becoming a professional cricket player. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal05.jpg
Sidesh Kumar, 10, who suffers from epilepsy, is comforted by Nafiza Bee co-ordinator of the Chingari Trust clinic on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal06.jpg
Suraj Raghuwanshi, 12, is comforted as he receives care at the Chingari Trust clinic on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal07.jpg
Shyam Babu, 10, plays at his home near the Union Carbide factory on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal08.jpg
Razik pronounces words during a rehabilitation exercise with speech therapist Prem Patel at the Chingari Trust Rehabilitation clinic on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal09.jpg
A physiotherapist holds the leg of a seven-year-old child at a clinic run by a non-governmental organization that caters to victims of the gas tragedy in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal10.jpg
Khushi Verma, right, and Apeksha Malviya, left, receive physiotherapy at a non-governmental organization in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal11.jpg
Khushi Verma, right, and Apeksha Malviya are given physiotherapy at a non-governmental organization in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal12.jpg
Vikas, right, and his brother Aman, both mentally challenged, wait at a non-governmental organization that conducts therapy sessions for the gas affected in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal13.jpg
Children born with mental and physical disabilities are seen during a physiotherapy session at a non-governmental organization in Bhopal, India, Monday, Nov. 30, 2009. AP / Altaf Qadri



bhopal14.jpg
A family stands beside the front of their house near the Union Carbide factory on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal15.jpg
Children on the perimeter wall at the site of the deserted Union Carbide factory on Nov. 29, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal16.jpg
A boy struggles to take a calf for grazing inside the Union Carbide factory compound through a broken wall in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal17.jpg
Discarded bottles of chemicals lay on the floor in a building at the site of the deserted Union Carbide factory on Nov. 28, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal18.jpg
A volunteer works on a mural painting outside the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, India, Monday, Nov. 30, 2009. AP / Altaf Qadri



bhopal19.jpg
Women complaining of ailments due to exposure to methyl isocyanate leaked during the Bhopal industrial disaster wait to consult doctor at a clinic run by a non governmental organization in Bhopal, India on Friday, Nov. 20, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal20.jpg
Residents meander along the streets of the Arif Nagar slum in Bhopal on Nov. 17, 2009. Livestock outnumber humans at the Arif Nagar slum, a toxic wasteyard next to the site of the world's worst industrial accident, which occurred 25 years ago this week in the Indian city of Bhopal. AFP / Getty Images / Raveendran



bhopal21.jpg
A man uses a hand pump to get water near the Union Carbide factory in Bhopal, India on Saturday, Nov. 21, 2009. AP / Saurabh Das



bhopal22.jpg
Women fill containers with clean water, that had been transported in because the local water is contaminated near the site of the deserted Union Carbide factory on Nov. 28, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



bhopal23.jpg
Children play near water towers in front of their homes near the Union Carbide factory on Nov. 27, 2009 in Bhopal, India. Getty Images / Daniel Berehulak



About Comments

Reader comments on Sacbee.com are the opinions of the writer, not The Sacramento Bee. If you see an objectionable comment, click the "report abuse" button below it. We will delete comments containing inappropriate links, obscenities, hate speech, and personal attacks. Flagrant or repeat violators will be banned. See more about comments here.

What You Should Know About Comments on Sacbee.com

Sacbee.com is happy to provide a forum for reader interaction, discussion, feedback and reaction to our stories. However, we reserve the right to delete inappropriate comments or ban users who can't play nice. (See our full terms of service here.)

Here are some rules of the road:

• Keep your comments civil. Don't insult one another or the subjects of our articles. If you think a comment violates our guidelines click the "report abuse" button to notify the moderators. Responding to the comment will only encourage bad behavior.

• Don't use profanities, vulgarities or hate speech. This is a general interest news site. Sometimes, there are children present. Don't say anything in a way you wouldn't want your own child to hear.

• Do not attack other users; focus your comments on issues, not individuals.

• Stay on topic. Only post comments relevant to the article at hand. If you want to discuss an issue with a specific user, click on his profile name and send him a direct message.

• Do not copy and paste outside material into the comment box.

• Don't repeat the same comment over and over. We heard you the first time.

• Do not use the commenting system for advertising. That's spam and it isn't allowed.

• Don't use all capital letters. That's akin to yelling and not appreciated by the audience.

You should also know that The Sacramento Bee does not screen comments before they are posted. You are more likely to see inappropriate comments before our staff does, so we ask that you click the "report abuse" button to submit those comments for moderator review. You also may notify us via email at feedback@sacbee.com. Note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us the profile name of the user who made the comment. Remember, comment moderation is subjective. You may find some material objectionable that we won't and vice versa.

If you submit a comment, the user name of your account will appear along with it. Users cannot remove their own comments once they have submitted them, but you may ask our staff to retract one of your comments by sending an email to feedback@sacbee.com. Again, make sure you note the headline on which the comment is made and tell us your profile name.

hide comments
blog comments powered by Disqus